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MissBusGirl

Concerns about the job

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What things should I be worried about before becoming a bus operator for the MTA? I get feedback from my cousin but I would like to hear some from you guys.

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1. People not realizing you can't pick all of them up, and when it is time to go you can't keep opening the door for every one of them running to the bus stop, because that is how you end up late. Believe me opening the door 600 times at the same stop, when you get down the road, you will see that now you have more people than usual at other stops, and you WILL be later than you are already. You will be cursed out eventually, cause it is the public, and they don't understand how it works here.

 

2. The funk of some people you will have to worry about. The stinky like to stand next the operator sometimes.

 

3. Drunks. If you get a drunk on your bus, make sure they sit down before moving, and keep an eye on them while on probation. They do have a tendency to get up sometimes, and fall over. You don't need that. Tell them to sit, don't get up, and find out where they are going, so when you get to that stop, make them get off the bus. Some do fall asleep, and it is best to know where they are going, so you can wake them up when getting to that stop. DON"T TOUCH THEM, to wake them up. You can startle someone, and don't want to be punched. I usually bang on the side panel or the seat they are occupying. If they keep getting up while you are in service while on probation, stop the bus. get a cop, or call control. Explain the situation, and have them removed before you go any further. They fall while you are moving, the bosses don't want to hear it most of the time.

 

4. Attitudes. Psychiatrists don't know squat about human beings. You will when you work here. If like most of us, you will be happy to get the job first, then realize this crap is worth $40hr, in the DOB for B/Os. You will possibly learn to hate it. That usually occurs within 3-6 months.

 

5. The MTA contradicts itself. "If you are operating your bus the way we taught you, you will be late". Wait until you get on the road. Some dispatchers don't like working, and will eventually stop putting you in place, and let you be late all day. You will get a cut slip when getting back to the depot late, but when doing this job you really want to get off on time. There are attitudes in the depots. You ask some immediate supervisors (crew dispatchers) for info, and they get nasty. There is one where I work, and drivers have talked REALLY bad about this one. I had a slight run in with this one, and told them off nicely in front of another dispatcher. I can care less if the depot's AGS, GS, or Manager is there. Co-worker gives me attitude, you will get one back.

 

6. The benefits is what holds most on to the job. They pay isn't worth it. It's truly blood money you make here. Take the next dispatchers exam, when (not if) you get in. One is coming up in January, but you will just be starting after that one and still won't have the requirements. Take the following one. If you actually like the job (it will become a career for you then), down the road you can get great jobs with less people.

 

I'm only telling you what you WILL encounter. Hope it doesn't discourage you. Misery loves company, and we do need more here. So come on down!

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Thanks for the very thorough info. I know its not about the money but about the passion. I've always liked buses. My father used to own an old school bus that he used to drive everyone to Atlantic City with. I've been driving school buses for some time now in both New Jersey & New York.

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