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FamousNYLover

Bus Rapid Transit Question Worldwide

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What countries/states have Bus Rapid Transit and Bus Rapid Transit Project ongoing beside Boston MBTA, Columbia, Mexico City, MetroJet, Hong Kong, Beijing?

 

I was wondering if any of you girls/guys know which city/state/country does not have BRT?

 

Do you know what is crowded bus lines if you guys know with long route.

 

I don't know if Japan has longest crowded bus, and maybe they should also create BRT?

 

My passed away Grandma and my mom didn't took me outside to explore.

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What countries/states have Bus Rapid Transit and Bus Rapid Transit Project ongoing beside Boston MBTA, Columbia, Mexico City, MetroJet, Hong Kong, Beijing?

 

I was wondering if any of you girls/guys know which city/state/country does not have BRT?

 

Do you know what is crowded bus lines if you guys know with long route.

 

I don't know if Japan has longest crowded bus, and maybe they should also create BRT?

 

My passed away Grandma and my mom didn't took me outside to explore.

 

Hong Kong does NOT have a currently operating BRT system, as far as I'm concerned. However I read from the local papers that they are planning to run prioritised bus routes along Hong Kong Island. I'm pretty sure there will be BRT lines in the future running along the East Kowloon corridor (as far as Tseung Kwan O, possibly) as well as the West Kowloon corridor (probably as far as Tuen Mun in the New Territories), as well as a few lines into Sha Tin and cross harbour lines.

And it won't happen at once, the Hong Kong buses are divided between 2 major companies: Kowloon Motor Bus and CityBus. The MTR also runs feeder routes. So a BRT system will either run under a new operator or perhaps after a merger of the KMB and CityBus.

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Hong Kong does NOT have a currently operating BRT system, as far as I'm concerned. However I read from the local papers that they are planning to run prioritised bus routes along Hong Kong Island. I'm pretty sure there will be BRT lines in the future running along the East Kowloon corridor (as far as Tseung Kwan O, possibly) as well as the West Kowloon corridor (probably as far as Tuen Mun in the New Territories), as well as a few lines into Sha Tin and cross harbour lines.

And it won't happen at once, the Hong Kong buses are divided between 2 major companies: Kowloon Motor Bus and CityBus. The MTR also runs feeder routes. So a BRT system will either run under a new operator or perhaps after a merger of the KMB and CityBus.

 

Isn't the 1 and 1A BRT lines?

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Isn't the 1 and 1A BRT lines?

 

There is NO bus rapid transit service currently operating in Hong Kong.

There is limited stop service on certain lines, but as far as I am concerned there is no pay-before-you-enter or signal prioritisations or any distinguishable "BRT elements" (such as POP fare boarding or ticket barrier schemes). 1 and 1A running in Kowloon, beginning at Star Ferry Pier, ending at either Chuk Yuen Estate or Sau Mau Ping are both local routes.

 

In fact, on most HK bus lines (not the minibuses), your fare is according to distance. If you board at the first stop, you pay the most. If you board at an intermediate stop, you pay less. The fare is determined by the distance travelled between the stop you got on and the destination. So even if you board at the first stop and get off 5 stops later, you pay for your journey and the rest of it. (Sucks doesn't it?)

 

Talking about paying on the KMB, it's pretty interesting they have the fare on a LED display and it changes every stop. It shows the cash fare on the top and the Octopus fare (you get a discount if you ride with the smart card). You could actually pay with bills on those buses.

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Hong Kong does NOT have a currently operating BRT system, as far as I'm concerned. However I read from the local papers that they are planning to run prioritised bus routes along Hong Kong Island. I'm pretty sure there will be BRT lines in the future running along the East Kowloon corridor (as far as Tseung Kwan O, possibly) as well as the West Kowloon corridor (probably as far as Tuen Mun in the New Territories), as well as a few lines into Sha Tin and cross harbour lines.

And it won't happen at once, the Hong Kong buses are divided between 2 major companies: Kowloon Motor Bus and CityBus. The MTR also runs feeder routes. So a BRT system will either run under a new operator or perhaps after a merger of the KMB and CityBus.

According to this video, Hong Kong has BRT. It comes after subway.

 

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There is NO bus rapid transit service currently operating in Hong Kong.

There is limited stop service on certain lines, but as far as I am concerned there is no pay-before-you-enter or signal prioritisations or any distinguishable "BRT elements" (such as POP fare boarding or ticket barrier schemes). 1 and 1A running in Kowloon, beginning at Star Ferry Pier, ending at either Chuk Yuen Estate or Sau Mau Ping are both local routes.

 

In fact, on most HK bus lines (not the minibuses), your fare is according to distance. If you board at the first stop, you pay the most. If you board at an intermediate stop, you pay less. The fare is determined by the distance travelled between the stop you got on and the destination. So even if you board at the first stop and get off 5 stops later, you pay for your journey and the rest of it. (Sucks doesn't it?)

 

Talking about paying on the KMB, it's pretty interesting they have the fare on a LED display and it changes every stop. It shows the cash fare on the top and the Octopus fare (you get a discount if you ride with the smart card). You could actually pay with bills on those buses.

 

Remember those 8-hundred lines, they cost like $30 bucks.

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According to this video, Hong Kong has BRT. It comes after subway.

 

 

First of all, that is Beijing, not Hong Kong. So I do not know where you got the idea that Hong Kong has BRT. I recommend that you watch the video carefully.

Second, even if it didn't say Beijing, you could assume it is based on some city in the Mainland. Cars drive on the opposite side in Hong Kong; the cars in the Mainland drive on the U.S side.

Third, MOST buses in Hong Kong are double decker, as it is a vestige of former British rule (think London routemasters). The buses in this video are low floor artics and some single unit low floor buses, which are not as common in Hong Kong.

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First of all, that is Beijing, not Hong Kong. So I do not know where you got the idea that Hong Kong has BRT. I recommend that you watch the video carefully.

Second, even if it didn't say Beijing, you could assume it is based on some city in the Mainland. Cars drive on the opposite side in Hong Kong; the cars in the Mainland drive on the U.S side.

Third, MOST buses in Hong Kong are double decker, as it is a vestige of former British rule (think London routemasters). The buses in this video are low floor artics and some single unit low floor buses, which are not as common in Hong Kong.

I just corrected my mistake when I put notice the title.

 

I wonder why Beijing's New Subway Line #5 and BRT is not wheelchair accessible?

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Sorry. That video was Beijing BRT.

Sorry about mistake.

 

It's alright.

Here's some differences between Hong Kong and Beijing that are shown in the clip:

The language that was used in the clip was Mandarin. In Hong Kong, most of us speak Cantonese, which sounds completely different from Mandarin. Hong Kong uses traditional Chinese characters (full form characters), in the Mainland, they use simplified Chinese characters.

The rapid transit system in Hong Kong is called the MTR (hence my handle) and in Beijing its the Beijing subway.

 

I doubt HK will get a system like Beijing's BRT, since the urban areas are VERY built up. Connaught Rd, Queen's Road and Des Voeux Rd are possibilities for BRT in Hong Kong Island. In fact, I think BRT won't work that well in Hong Kong Island. There is a double decker tram from Kennedy Town to Shau Kei Wan, running along a great portion of Northern Hong Kong Island (where most of the businesses and estates of HK Island are located at). And it is VERY CHEAP. (HK$2 flat fare = roughly 30 USD cents). The cheapest MTR fare between two stations (not crossing the Harbour) is HK$4 (around $0.55). And I already told you guys about the bus fares in Hong Kong.

If the government does implement BRT in HK island, it will drive the minibus drivers mad as hell (aside from the tram, most Islanders use the minibus to get around). So it won't work. They could try routes heading into the New Territories like Sha Tin or Fanling. Or from one side of Kowloon to another (like from Lai Chi Kok on the west side to Kwun Tong on the east).

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I just corrected my mistake when I put notice the title.

 

I wonder why Beijing's New Subway Line #5 and BRT is not wheelchair accessible?

 

Lol, I think they need to learn from the Americans on that.

Most new transport systems around the world have accessibility provisions. I'm rather surprised that the new lines don't have lifts. I mean China has a lot of dough, right? If they could build several lines at once and open them at the same time, why can't they build some lifts with it? :P

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Remember those 8-hundred lines, they cost like $30 bucks.

 

Lol, that's because they are premium services. I believe you are talking about the buses that go to the Sha Tin Racecourse right?

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In Paris there is a BRT, in the southern part of the city. It is entirely in the southern suburb of Paris and allows travels inside the southern borough from the west to the east without passing through Paris itself.

The line is nearly entirely isolated from the rest of the traffic and uses french Artics Irisbus Agora L (L for long) €3 (the bus' gas emissions are good enough for the €3 norm today the norm is €5).

 

some pics:

http://mediathequefleurus1.free.fr/ligne_TVM/slides/tvm_1.html

http://mediathequefleurus1.free.fr/ligne_TVM/slides/tvm_3.html

 

Copyright Médiathèque Fleurus and the owners of the pictures.

Edited by Ms61

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In Paris there is a BRT, in the southern part of the city. It is entirely in the southern suburb of Paris and allows travels inside the southern borough without passing through Paris itself.

The line is nearly entirely isolated from the rest of the traffic and uses french Artics Irisbus Agora L (L for long) €3 (the bus' gas emissions are good enough for the €3 norm today the norm is €5).

 

some pics:

http://mediathequefleurus1.free.fr/ligne_TVM/slides/tvm_1.html

http://mediathequefleurus1.free.fr/ligne_TVM/slides/tvm_3.html

 

Copyright Médiathèque Fleurus and the owners of the pictures.

 

C'est bon!

Est-ce que vous êtes parisien?

 

(That's great! Are you a Parisian?)

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Quito, Ecuador has three separate BRT systems: Metrobus, Ecovia, and Trole. I rode the Ecovia (diesel buses with mainly island platform boarding) and the Trole (ETB with almost entirely side platform boarding). They both have dedicated median ROWs and are the only truly regulated bus lines in all of Quito.

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