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FlushingExpress

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  1. I do not know what you mean by Brighton trains being unable to use the Montague tracks. How does the go there when the bridge is closed for repairs? Also how do you explain this? Taken when a northbound had its emergency brakes activated at DeKalb, thus the behind it was sent down via Montague to avoid congestion. Yes! I didn't say the swap will never happen. I just said it will not happen as fast as everyone claims and that does not necessarily mean R46s will go to Coney Island because the R211s may be in service before then. That applies to everyone else who keeps saying stuff about future car assignments like DJHammers and R32 3838. They never provide any evidence on their claims (like R46s going to the , R68/68As to the , five-car R179s to the , R32s and R160As to the , or R42s staying past 2020; none of which have been confirmed), so say that to them before you say that to me. A couple of things I am right about: Jamaica having less R160s then it did in 2010, having sent some to Coney Island in 2011 for the transfer, then the restoration in 2016, and last year's transit crisis; no other car type besides R160s can run on the at the moment due to lack of sufficient rollsigns or programs; and R46s being pulled off Brighton twice due to residential complaints.
  2. Yes but truthfully Concourse may be the perfect yard for the R32s being that it currently only maintains one car type (as the MTA doesn't like having yards maintaining more than two different car types as it makes the tasks difficult) and R32s would be better on the than the since the 4th Avenue Line is four tracked all the way to the bridge and can use both the bypass and outer tracks at DeKalb Avenue should one of the pairs get blocked for whatever reasons. Trains can also terminate at Atlantic Avenue's express tracks without disrupting local service, so they do not have to worry about going through the Montague Tunnel. If that were the case, its R68s can go to the because I heard its superintendent wants 600-feet trains on that route during the shutdown as they can hold more people than 480-foot trains. The honestly is a bad choice for the R32s because its two terminals are very far from rail yards, so if a train has to be taken OOS due to a breakdown or maintenance, they can't get a replacement train and it will cause a large gap in service. This happens on the a lot, but I agree, best thing to do is sit back and wait. Yes it makes me laugh that some people believe any crap that comes out of a transit worker's mouth. Working for the MTA doesn't mean they know everything about the future. Byford's capital plan also has CBTC for every trunk line by 2030, with Lexington Avenue being next, but all the R62A lovers keep down playing the idea of the getting NTTs back because CBTC there won't be ready before their retirement, yet they are so confident about it being on Queens Boulevard, 8th Avenue or 6th Avenue on time. Don't you just love hypocrisy?
  3. We already know R32s and R42s CANNOT run on the because they cannot fit through the Montague Street Tunnel. If god forbid something blocks the northbound DeKalb Avenue bridge track for several hours like a 12-9, power outage or track fire and there is already an R32/R42 in the tunnel under Flatbush, the only way it can proceed without disrupting other trains is via Montague. It cannot sit down there forever or turn back at Court Street without holding up other trains. We also already know the rumored Jamaica-Coney Island swap will NOT happen for the foreseeable future being that CBTC on Queens Boulevard will not be ready until the mid to late 2020s, R46s cannot run on the northbound local track on Brighton due to residential complaints about noise and vibrations, and no other car type besides R160s can run on the because of lack of sufficient rollsigns or programs. In fact, Jamaica recently loaned a few more R160s to Coney Island over the summer. Since August, I have been seeing some R160As on the with service posters on them and more R46s on the as well. It is already November (i.e. start of the Fall pick) and no one single car transfer has been made. Such a large swap would take a long time anyway (it took 5 years for Corona and Westchester to swap all their cars) and should have started already if Jamaica has to be all R160s before the Canarsie shutdown. As I said before, if that was the ultimate goal, someone please explain why Jamaica has been sending R160s to Coney Island numerous times over the past 7 years? Also, none of the other junk anyone says has been confirmed either.
  4. I just love how people keep bringing up this dumb rumored swap, yet never provide a reliable source for it, and no, what comes out of a transit worker's mouth is not a reliable source. They are not psychics and cannot see the future Yeah, I still avoid riding the R42s as much as possible due to my strong hate for them. Thankfully there are only 50 of those rusted tin cans and will be retired once all R179s are in service. "Those lines don’t have the volume to justify 60’ equipment" Oh really? ride them yourself and you will they have way more ridership than the A, C, J/Z, M and R, especially on the Astoria Line, they will not want their awesome R160s replaced by fat old junks. They will as CBTC on Queens Boulevard will not be ready for another 5-6 years. I love how everything thinks it will go off without a hitch, yet CBTC on Flushing and Canarsie were well over 4 years behind schedule. If the ultimate goal was for Jamaica to be all R160s, someone please explain why Jamaica has been persistently giving Coney Island its R160s over the past 7 years? Yep, hence it's dumb to give the fat R46s to the N/W when they have way more ridership than the R, though I would call an R46 on the W "Wario" because he wears yellow and has a black mustache (like the W logo) and is incredibly fat like an R46. Non CBTC equipment can still run on CBTC activated lines, hence it is not really urgent for the R to get R160s right now anyway. The F uses about 7-8 sets of R46s right now, so the five-car R179s can go to Coney Island, who will send enough R160s to Jamaica to make just the F all R160s. R142s to the 6 and R62As to the 2? That would be a blessing considering how horrible the 6 has been since the crappy R62As took over. If Coney Island gives R160s to Jamaica, it better get all the five-car R179s in their place as the NTTs are the only cars that can handle the heavy loads along Brighton and 2nd Avenue on the Q, not to mention no SMEEs have the 96th Street rollsigns or programs and R46s cannot run on the northbound local track of Brighton due to residential complaints about noise and vibrations. I just love how people are such hypocrites, saying 60 footers are badly needed for the A because of crowding, yet 75 footers will do well on the more crowded N and Q trains, or how R68/68As will do well on the Q because it has the same terminals 24/7, but are horrible on the G even though it too has the same terminals 24/7. Reminds me of the time R32 3838 said on Facebook that when the G was transferred to Coney Island in 2011, it should have gotten R160s instead of R68/68As, which would have been dumb as the N needed the R160s more, being that it has way more ridership than the G and allowed Astoria to maintain a full R160 fleet. If all what he said is true, Coney Island would have too many different car types to handle. East New York has been complaining about that issue, which is why they are so happy the R32s and R42s will soon be off the J/Z.
  5. I will just give my best to worst list and my reasons for them: has always been my favorite with its very frequent service, fast express runs, many unique stations, and great views of Queens. I miss the R62As and the railfan windows they had, though. frequent service, runs fast in Brooklyn (even faster than the express) and Manhattan, the Manhattan Bridge offers a great view of Lower Manhattan, love the new stations along 2nd Avenue, and is all R160s, but trains can sometimes run irregularly since they conflict with other routes. frequent service, fast express run in Queens, and is all R160s, but it gets extremely crowded along 53rd Street. frequent service, all R142/142As, runs fast in Manhattan and Brooklyn, and offers nice views of the Bronx, including Yankee Stadium, but it runs slow in that borough, is always crowded, and weekend service is low. frequent weekday service, fast express runs in Queens, awesome views of Brooklyn (even though it runs slow there), and is mostly R160s, but weekend service is low, trains run irregularly due to its long route and sharing of tracks with other services, and still uses some slow R46s. frequent weekday service, runs fast for a local, and the route has many unique points, including the World Trade Center site box, Broadway Bridge crossing, 91st Street, Dyckman Street Tunnel, and Manhattan Valley Viaduct, but its R62As are crapping out and getting around some of the Upper Manhattan stations is annoying since they either have no crossovers/crossunders or are very deep. the Sea Beach Line looks beautiful in the winter, the Astoria Line has a fascinating view of the surrounding area and the service is mostly R160s, but trains run irregularly since they conflict with other routes and the 4th Avenue Express run is plagued with timers. frequent service, is all NTTs, and the route has many unique points, especially at Wilson Avenue and south of Broadway Junction, but it is crowded all the time and goes through some scary neighborhoods. is all R142s, the express runs in the Bronx and Manhattan are great and the line north of East 180th Street is a throwback to the old NYC railroad services, but off-peak service is low and trains are often irregular and crowded. is all R142s, fast express runs in Manhattan and has nice views of the Bronx, but trains are extremely irregular and crowded, run slow in the Bronx and Brooklyn, and weekend service is low. short waiting time, runs fast for a local in Manhattan, not very crowded, the route passes through three closed stations, and has good views of south Bronx, but weekend service is low and I really miss the R142As as the R62As have resulted in more delays due to longer dwelling time and garbled announcements and loss of my two favorite automated announcements. fast express runs in Manhattan and the IRT New Lots Line has nice views of Brooklyn, but it does not run frequently and the neighborhoods in Brooklyn it goes to are not safe. uses R160s, R179s and R32s, the route has many unique portions and the elevated sections allow amazing views of northern Brooklyn and Queens, but trains run infrequently, are slow during off-peak hours, still has 50 rusted tin can R42s, the short express section between Myrtle and Marcy Avenues is near pointless, and skip-stop service needs to run for the entire rush hour frame and in both directions. really low scheduled service, has an all underground route, and goes through some dangerous neighborhoods in Brooklyn, but the R32s and R160As can run very fast, even faster than the express. Franklin Avenue waiting time is long, people tend to hold the car doors at the terminals, and transferring to/from other trains is a hassle, but the route has many historical features. very low scheduled service, but it is all R160s and the Myrtle Avenue Line has a lot of historical features. 42nd Street pretty boring since it only travels between two stops in an entirely underground route, is often crowded, and prone to people holding the doors, but it is a vital part of the subway's history and I love the promotional decorations it always gets. infrequent, irregular service, the chubby R68s ruin the express sections, and runs slow on West End, but that section offers great views of the surrounding area even though it needs express service and the Concourse Line has some interestingly-built stations. low scheduled service and there is nothing special about this train as it just a weekday supplement to others, but at least it is mostly R160s. long scheduled waits, trains do not arrive on time, and its overweight R68/68As ruin the express run on Brighton, though it can be fast if you catch it on time. very prone to delays, gaps, and bunching due to its long route, waiting time for each branch in Queens is horrendous, weekend service sucks, and the fat R46s spoil the express runs in Manhattan and Brooklyn, but it runs a few sets of R32s and the Rockaway section has spectacular views of Jamaica Bay and the peninsula. Rockaway Park : very low scheduled frequency and overcrowded in the summer, but the route offers great views of the Atlantic Ocean and Rockaways. has short-length trains and infrequent service. The lone good thing about it is the Gowanus El crossing. has always been my least favorite train with its slow and boring route as it is the system's longest local with no outdoor portions except for a small section in Bay Ridge, trains do not run often, are prone to irregularity, and the obese R46s do not help much, but at least a couple of R160s run on it periodically.
  6. Because NTTs are superior to older cars in every single way, faster, less breakdowns, brighter interiors, wider doors, clear automated announcements, more glass and not fat-looking. I still do my best to avoid the R42s and R44s at all costs due to my extreme hate for them. When the used R32s, R38s, and R44s in 2007-08, I would always wait for an R32 or R38 or just take the instead. When the sleeky and shiny R32s were replaced by the rusted and ugly R42s on the , I just avoided riding it until the R32s and R46s returned and the R44s finally retired. thankfully. When the same thing happened to the , I would always wait for an R32 until January 2009 when the became mostly R40M/42s, then I just avoided that service until it became all R160s the following summer. I remember riding an R42 in March 2009 for 20 minutes from 18th Avenue to Jay Street and it was so horrible, the only thing that kept me from losing my mind was the miserable look on everyone else's faces. Now when an R42 shows up on the , unless I am in a real hurry or only going a couple of stops, I would wait for the next train, which is likely not an R42. Same with the R46s on the . I have also stopped riding the entirely since those crappy R62As replaced the awesome R142As, taking away my two favorite automated announcements. A service that used to be one of my favorites is now one of the worst. I just take the to the nearest express stop and walk and use Lexington Avenue-63rd Street to get to school despite its depth and long escalators as the and are mostly and all R160s, respectively.
  7. Actually there would, have way more ridership than the so putting 75 footers on them would cause massive delays. People who disagree with me need to get their butts off the computer and ride the five days a week nearly from end-to-end like I do. Yes politics is strong in Brooklyn, which is exactly why that dumb Jamaica-Coney Island swap will not happen as riders all love the R160s and do not want them replaced with fat old junks like I said many times, plus realistically, QBL CBTC is at least 5-6 years away. Great job being a hypocrite on this and many other topics (e.g. 75 footers being horrible on the yet would do well on the more heavily used Broadway Lines, the NTTs not needed to be on the as it has the same service 24/7, but needed for the even though it also has the same service 24/7, ). Honestly, that is very overhyped and the 's ridership may not rise as much as you think. The only riders who would use the would be those in the Broadway Junction area and south. Those to the north would use the as they are closer and have faster access to Lower and Midtown Manhattan. ridership may not rise as much as you think as it does not go to Manhattan. It will probably only be high between Broadway and Court Square for transferring. Not a very accurate car assignment roster. There will not be any R160s or R42s on the , R68s on the , R46s on the or R32s on the but i guess everyone can live in their own dumb fantasy. R42s are being retired by the end of this year or early next, the R68s have proven to be unable to handing the heavy loads along Brighton and 2nd Avenue, and the will still use R68/68As during the shutdown as full length trains. Though if R46s do run on the (W), I would call it "Wario" because his main colors are black and yellow like the W logo and he is incredibly fat like an R46 That won't really make a difference. All cars will break down eventually and the will also connect to the during the shutdown, yet I have not heard you say it should use R142/142As.
  8. I had a dream that the overweight 75 footers were magicially compressed into 60 footers and as a result, there were no fat people living in the city. Wish that really happened
  9. Coney Island wont give any R160s away. N and W riders love them and would fume if they were replaced by fat old junks. Besides, they still have way more ridership than the A and C, hence need to stay mostly 60 footers. The C will be 100% R46s while the A will be half r46s and R32s. The 10 car R179s may or may not run on the A or C. They may also go to Jamaica for the F and R, which will mean more R46s for Pitkin, they can also go to Coney Island to make the N and W all NTTs, which would mean more R68s for the G, but we will see. R42s can't run on the shuttle because of OPTO, there are no plans to run the shuttle full length at all times. They'll be retired once enough R179s are in service. People keep saying the transit system needs more cars during the L train shutdown yet do not realize most lines and yards are already at near capacity during rush hours, especially the Williamsburg Bridge, Cranberry Tunnel, and Culver Line between Bergen street and church avenue, so the TA cannot really run more trains on the A, C, G, J , M, Z than they do now. Besides, they can also borrow cars from the L during the shutdown. And i really hope no one brings up QBL CBTC again as it really has no relevance to the R179s and will not be ready until 2024-2025 the earliest.
  10. I find it dumb the still runs local between Times Square and Chambers during this suspension when the is not running, thus there are no trains holding them up on the express tracks at 14th Street, meaning it can run express on the entire 7th Avenue segment instead of just north of Times Square which only saves 3-4 minutes from the local. I also find it dumb the and need to switch routes north of East 180th Street during the Clark Street Tunnel closure being that the Dyre Avenue Line is not much shorter than the northern White Plains Road Line. In fact, it only takes about 4-6 extra minutes for a train to travel between East 180th and Wakefield compared to one traveling between East 180th and Dyre, hence it should not be a huge problem for train crews. Another G.O. I find dumb even though it provides great photo/video opportunities is the and swap in Brooklyn. it causes massive confusion for riders, especially since Grand Street, Sunset Park and West End Line have many riders who do not understand English. If the TA needs to do work on the 7th Avenue-53rd Street area, they should leave the alone and run the in two sections: between the Bronx and via the after 59th Street and after West 4th Street to 2nd Avenue, and between Brooklyn and West 4th Street/Broadway-Lafayette Street on its normal route. Heck the can even run to 96th Street/2nd Avenue if there is no work being done on the 6th Avenue express tracks. Another G.O. I do not get, how come on weekends when there is an express reroute on the Woodlawn Line, some trains terminate at 125th while on weekdays for same reroute all trains can go to Woodlawn? Waiting 16+ minutes for a train on an entire line can be a huge pain. and why have trains been running local in Manhattan on weekends lately while the can still run express?
  11. Most people commenting here are total hypocrities. They keep whining about how horrible the A is using the 75 footers yet say they would be fine on the N, Q and W when they clearly have much ridership than the A. The Q especially since 2nd Avenue opened, which is why the fat 75 footers will never run on it again. It makes me laugh how they think QBL CBTC will go off without a hitch in recent times many other projects like flushing CBTC, opening of 34th street hudson yards, reopening of cortlandt st and the r179 order were all behind schedule. I rode on QBL recently and barely 10% of the project is done, so R46s to CI will never happen. It's also funny how Jamaica will be 100% R160s yet over the years, Jamaica has been persistently giving its R160s to Coney Island. In fact I think they did it again recently being that i have seen a few r160s on the N Q W with E and F service posters on them. If the ultimate goal was for Jamaica to be all R160s, why didn't they send R46s to CI when the G was transferred there in 2011, when the W was restored, or during last year's state of emergency. Actually from what I heard, the M shuttle does stink because of the R42s and few people ride it because they hate them so much. In fact the R32s were supposed to be used on there, but J riders preferred them more, so r42s were used instead, plus they're actually less prone to breakdowns if they run back and forth a short distance and fresh pond yard has a temporary overhaul shop for them, so his post is nonsensical.
  12. ELECTRICAL IMPROVEMENTS Trains skip 168 St in both directions trains and free shuttle buses provide alternate service Weekend, 6:45 AM Sat to 8 PM Sun, Jan 20 - 21 I guess they are doing elevator work that weekend, which is why the cannot stop at that station? EQUIPMENT TESTING Brighton Beach-bound trains run local from Prospect Park to Kings Hwy Days, 10 AM to 3:30 PM, Mon to Fri, Jan 29 - Feb 2 What exactly are they testing? I thought the R179s have finished all their tests.
  13. Why I prefer the New Technology Trains (R160A/160Bs, R143s, R142/142As, and R188s): great, fast, reliable cars with low breakdown rates, bright interiors, lots of cool features (clear automated announcements, LED displays inside and out, LCD and LED signs signs, and FIND system, strip maps,), and good looking inside and out. They have greatly upgraded every train they run on and make riders and train crew, who love the cab features, feel so happy. Why I like the R32s: oldest cars in the system, but their structurally durable car bodies have allowed them to last well past the average life expectancy of a subway car and outlive five car classes built after them. Fast and lightweight and they are the only "B" Divisions with the old fashion side signs, box shape car design, bright interiors, high comfy bench seating, and clean rail fan window. Unfortunately, they do break down a lot, so unlike other R32 lovers, I know they have to retire sooner or later. Why I liked the Redbirds: am a fan of the color red (it was nice to see other colors besides stainless steel silver) and enjoyed the flickering lights and bright, unique interiors, but they had to retire when they did. Why I hate the R68/68As: used to be great, but now suck. So fat that they can't go very fast, break down frequently, air-conditioning is always broken or leaking, side signs and interior walls are scratched up, damaged or dirty, and cannot walk between cars, posing a safety hazard during an emergency. Why I hate the R62/62As: like the R68/68As, they used to be great, but now suck, especially on the (6), besides losing my two favorite automated announcements. Interiors are too dark and scratched up, seats are too tiny, air-conditioners barely work, doors are too narrow, and announcements are garbled. Why I hate the R46s: fat-looking, slow, dark interiors, dull and dirty exteriors, cannot walk between cars, and breaking down way too often. Why I completely hated the R44s: biggest failures in New York City Transit history; fat, slow, ugly, and had too many mechanical, structural, and technical problems. Every time I rode on them, something had to malfunction, from the doors to the lights to the air-conditioning, the list goes on, hence I avoided them at all costs until they finally retired. Why I really hate the R42s: structurally and cosmetically horrendous inside and out with rusty car bodies, scratched up dirty windows, grafitti-tagged interiors, and uncomfortable seats. The only thing that keeps me from going insane when I ride them is laughing at the miserable look on everyone else's faces. Why I hated the R40/40Ms: though fast with good air-conditioning and interiors, their car bodies were rusting, seats were uncomfortable, and ride was bumpy. The slanted fronts looked hideous too. Why I hated the R38s: rotting car bodies and dark, and dirty interiors. I have been to public restrooms that were cleaner than them.
  14. Necro-posting Because I really want to update my best and worst list and do not feel like starting a new thread Best cars: R160A/160Bs: Contrary to what morons I know often say, they are the great, fast, reliable cars with low breakdown rates, bright interiors, lots of cool features (clear automated announcements, LED displays inside and out, LCD signs, and FIND system), and good looking inside and out. They have greatly upgraded every train they run on and make riders and train crew, who love the cab features, feel so happy. R143s: another great, reliable car type with lots of cool features. Only difference between them and the R160s are the interior side signs and strip maps. R142/142A/188s: same as above, a much-needed boast for the "A" Division and the routes they run on R32s: oldest cars in the system, but their structurally durable car bodies have allowed them to last well past the average life expectancy of a NYC Subway car and outlive five car classes built after them. Fast and lightweight and they are the only "B" Divisions with the old fashion side signs, box shape car design, bright interiors, high comfy bench seating, and clean rail fan window. Unfortunately, they do break down a lot, so unlike other R32 lovers, I know they have to retire sooner or later. All Redbirds: I am a fan of the color red (it was nice to see other colors besides stainless steel silver) and enjoyed the flickering lights and bright, unique interiors, but they had to retire when they did. Worst cars: R68/68As: used to be great, but now suck. So fat that they can't go very fast, break down frequently, air-conditioning is always broken or leaking, side signs and interior walls are scratched up, damaged or dirty, and cannot walk between cars, posing a safety hazard during an emergency. R62/62As: like the R68/68As, they used to be great, but now suck, especially on the (6). Interiors are too dark and scratched up, seats are too tiny, air-conditioners break down a lot, doors are too narrow, and announcements are often garbled. R46s: fat-looking, slow, dark interiors, dull and dirty exteriors, cannot walk between cars, and breaking down way too often. R44s: biggest failures in New York City Transit history; fat, slow, ugly, and had too many mechanical, structural, and technical problems. Every time I rode on them, something had to malfunction, from the doors to the lights to the air-conditioning, the list goes on, hence I avoided them at all costs until they finally retired. R42s: structurally and cosmetically horrendous inside and out with rusty car bodies, scratched up dirty windows, grafitti-tagged interiors, and uncomfortable seats. The only thing that keeps me from going insane when I ride them is laughing at the miserable look on everyone else's faces. R40/40Ms: though fast with good air-conditioning and interiors, their car bodies were rusting, seats were uncomfortable, and ride was bumpy. The slanted fronts looked hideous too. R38s: rotting car bodies and dark, and dirty interiors. I have been to public restrooms that were cleaner than them.
  15. They will be scrapped. They will not be needed anywhere once the Myrtle viaduct project is done. ENY will have enough R160s, R179s, and R143s and 207th street and Pitkin will have enough R32s and R46s. Plus there are only 50 rusted tin cans in service, so retiring them will not take too long and it would be illogical to keep them if the TA wants to retire at least 50 R32s.

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