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KeystoneRegional

Station Colors?

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It's just a design, nothing special, although there are some design differences along the BMT, IND and IRT stations.

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Interesting and I know the difference between BMT, IND and IRT, like art and station measurements/alignments, right?...

 

Yep, you sure got that right. The IND/BMT station platforms (excluding the (S) at Franklin Avenue) are longer than the IRT Platforms, although the (N)(W)(7)<7> do share platforms at Queensboro Plaza.

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The station livery (otherwise, colours) of the IND are rather random. However in the outer boroughs, as a rule of thumb, the local stations' livery on a line are the same as the livery of the adjacent express station that is closest to (Midtown) Manhattan.

IND Rutgers Street:

York Street, East Broadway, Delancey Street have the same livery, purple. This is the same as 2nd Avenue (which acted acts as the express station), which is purple.

IND Central Park West:

116th, 110th-Cathedral Parkway, 103rd, 96th, 86th, 81th and 72nd Street have the same livery, blue. This reflected the PREVIOUS livery of the 59th Street Columbus Circle Station, which was blue.

135th reflected the livery of 125th which is green.

IND Concourse for example:

182nd-183th is the same as Tremont's, which is deep red.

174th-175th, 170th, 167th, 161th, 155th have the same livery, orange. This is the same as 145th (Lower Level) which is also orange.

 

It gets a bit random inside Manhattan, but there is a distinct pattern outside Manhattan for the original IND lines.

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The station livery (otherwise, colours) of the IND are rather random. However in the outer boroughs, as a rule of thumb, the local stations' livery on a line are the same as the livery of the adjacent express station that is closest to (Midtown) Manhattan.

 

 

Another example:

 

The local stations between Roosevelt Avenue and Forest Hills are all a shade of blue. Roosevelt is a darker shade of blue. Forest Hills is green, and all local stations after until the next express stations are a shade of green.

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The station colors are perfectly explained by the NYC subway website. The information is in the link and with the color chart. Here is how Nycsubway website explained it,

"Explanation of the Color Groupings

(Contributed by Bob Sklar) As you go away from downtown Manhattan, whether uptown or towards Brooklyn, the colors change each time an express station is reached. Thereafter, all the local stations have the same color (or color group) tiles as the preceding express station. This presumably was intended to serve as a means for helping passengers to remember where to change for the local on the way home from work.

 

Since the 'G' line skirts Manhattan, and could thus be said to point away from Manhattan in both directions, all stations from Court Square to Fulton Street have tiles with the same color group, namely green. Three different shades of green exist in this section."

http://www.nycsubway.org/articles/indcolor.html

Also more information form the site under the history of the IND subway,

Even the color bands on the station walls meant something

 

Station tile bands belong to five color families - Red, Yellow, Green, Blue and Purple.

 

The color of the tile changes at each express station, with the local stations following it (going outbound) belonging to the same color family.

 

With one exception, these groupings follow the same order: (going outbound): Purple, Blue, Green, Yellow, and Red. The exception is on the Fulton IND - Utica/Ralph/Rockaway (red family) is followed by blue family stations Broadway-ENY, Liberty, Van Siclen and Shepherd, THEN comes purple (Euclid) THEN green (Grant).

 

Express stations (except on 8th Avenue) have wider tile bands than local stations. Tablets are simple, with a common design, and black tile with white letters spell out the station name on the wall.

 

The Crosstown line, having no express stations, uses three forms of green in its tile bands, with light green indicating transfer stations. (Broadway was planned as a transfer to an IND Second System line).

http://www.nycsubway.org/articles/historyindependentsubway.html

So in the IND stations, express stations have colors going into a pattern. The local stations keep the color of the past express station until the next express station. I think of it as the express stations is the family and local stations are the offsprings.

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The station colors are perfectly explained by the NYC subway website. The information is in the link and with the color chart. Here is how Nycsubway website explained it,

 

http://www.nycsubway.org/articles/indcolor.html

Also more information form the site under the history of the IND subway,

 

http://www.nycsubway.org/articles/historyindependentsubway.html

So in the IND stations, express stations have colors going into a pattern. The local stations keep the color of the past express station until the next express station. I think of it as the express stations is the family and local stations are the offsprings.

That is the best approach to understanding the livery of the original IND

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