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Ron2themax

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  1. Add 8301 to the list from Wayne garage. I saw it on the 190E this week. So in total Wayne has 3 2002 D4500 buses left. Again they are coaches #8294, #8301 & #8304
  2. I believe they are all scrapped except for coaches 8294 and 8304 which are still at Wayne
  3. Wayne garage has only coaches 8294 and 8304 from that 2002 D4500 group. The rest of the 2002 and 2003 D4500 bunch are gone. Also, there is no 304 route at Wayne
  4. Don't forget Market St.( Paterson) , which is Northern Division based
  5. I would rather have NJT to incorporate that scheme that was on Neoplan 9503 as a demo paint scheme. The scheme is similar to their current ALP engines, but covers the the entire ad space from the first window on each side to the last window. That works better than this wave. Too much white paint to be your predominant scheme😑
  6. At least it's not the hardshell vandal resistant seat that MTA NYCT, CTA (Chicago) on some of their NovaBus LFSs and my former transit TARTA on their new ElDorados 40' Axcess just to name a few TAs.
  7. Then they ought to pick up the 4 route and run it themselves instead of relying an independent operator. I don't understand why NJT can't step up/ take things in their own hands. Enough of the excuses about driver shortage, equipment shortage and bus garage (Greenville) limited of adding more buses to its facility
  8. Another option and cheaper way to get to the Mega Mall from New York City is line 160. It's $4.50 one way I believe, but the thing is you have to do some walking along MetLife Stadium then walk on the pedestrian bridge over rte 120 to get to the mall. That's if you don't want to oay a ridiculous $18.00 round-trip fare. Nine bucks one way is like a 7 to 8 zone ride to New York if I'm not mistaken
  9. Like I said before here on this topic, the NJT supervisors should be out there making sure things goes smoothly for both the driver and passengers along with doing a passenger count from Hoboken Terminal and Union City 32nd St and Bergenline and American Dream. NJ Transit might have to increase service levels on the 85 to every 20 minutes to relieve overcrowding. That bus route has alot of hot spots of riders in Hoboken, Jersey City, Union City and Mill Creek area of shops and hotels. One other thing, NJ Transit and the media that understands NJT operations ought to know full well that those 3 local lines that serve the Mega Mall primarily for the employees inthe urban cities and some small towns, will get a vast amount of riders that will shop and look around inside the mall. You said it dkm07302...the 85 you saw with long lines is just an example.
  10. You guys have done the work as far as figuring the game/other options as far as getting to the Mega Mall from New York and points in northern New Jersey. Smart you guys outline the fare stuctures. Alot of people including most tourists are simple mind hence they'll pay the ridiculous $9.00 fare. The smart ones will get around it by saving cash using other options that NJ Transit doesn't want to mention to the public. It just boils down to are individuals have the patience to do the transfers and waiting time other than direct service NYC speaking. As far as the 160, unfortunately it doesn't stop at the American Dream transit hub. Only serving Metlife and Race track. That will really mess up the fare structure of the 160 if it stops there at the mall from NYC. People wouldn't even take the 355. Also, Market Street don't have 45 footers. I assume Meadowlands Garage will use there 45 footer MCIs on that route with occasional D4000s depending on equipment availability. It's funny how New York Waterway Ferry Service is joining in. Good for those residents living in Weehawken and those that take bus 158 from Fort Lee and Edgewater. I think the 85 route may see a huge jump in ridership to the point of revising the schedule to every 15 to 20 minutes. Imagine the crowds in Hoboken, Jersey City Heights and Union City (transfer point from other NJTbuses and jitneys) and Mill Creek shops, but with the hotels in that area on that route. Crushing loads. We all know NJT supervisors will be out in tow at multiple busy bus stops long the route. Perhaps with there pen and pad like those at the PABT writing the number of riders boarding each route.
  11. Nice pictures! Nice pictures! I hope the NJ Friends Historic Bus Mueseum down in Lakewood will reserve a Neoplan artic, preferably a Suburban. Of course a good conditioned artic. It's gonna need a total makeover since majority of them are banged up, dirty, stained, some electric parts not working ect. Surely NJT will provide good conditioned parts on the current buses and replace it with the one bus that's going into the historic bus lineup. Hell, I wish the museum could get both transit and suburban configuration Neoplan artics
  12. Courtesy of Trains Magazine: KEARNY, N.J. — NJ Transit provided the first public look and more details on its three heritage locomotives on Tuesday, and did not rule out the possibility that more such locomotives could follow. The locomotives were unveiled Saturday at the agency's Family Days event for employees. [See "NJ Transit reveals heritage locomotives," Trains News Wire, Oct. 5, 2019.] The project evolved as part of discussions among several NJ Transit managers who noted how other railroads and airlines used heritage paint schemes to mark anniversaries. A mix of paint and wraps were used to note the lineage of the commuter rail operations that became part of NJ Transit. The three engines — Bombardier ALP-46A electric No. 4636, now wearing a Pennsylvania Railroad scheme; dual-mode Bombardier ALP-45DP No. 4519, commemorating Erie Lackawanna, and EMD GP40H-2 diesel No. 4109, returned to a version of its as-delivered Central of New Jersey scheme — were chosen because of their specific maintenance cycles and their need to be repainted. The GP40H-2 had last been painted in 1992. When the project was approved, Deputy General Manager of Mechanical Equipment Charlie Tomaszfski assembled a team of carmen, mechanics, laborers, and shop workers to prepare and decorate the locomotives, extending a collaboration that also involved senior and executive-level staff members. Contacts within the railroad industry and with railroad historical societies provided technical assistance with paint colors, fonts, and striping details. For the two Bombardier locomotives, 60% of the heritage scheme utilizes a vinyl wrap, with the design of those wraps a collaboration between NJ Transit and the historical societies. The GP40PH-2 was repainted into a scheme reasonably consistent with its original version, using some logo and lettering decals. After drawings for the designs of the wraps were reviewed internally and externally, Reidler Railroad Graphics of Saint Clair, Pa., supplied and installed the wraps and lettering. Conrail, the owner of the Pennsylvania and Eric Lackawanna names and likenesses, entered into a licensing agreement allowing their use and reviewed the conceptual drawings. On both the Bombardier ALP-46A and ALP-45DP units, the black “sideburn” sections on the previous paint jobs house blower and electrical runs that require the areas to be unencumbered during maintenance cycles. These areas, defined by hard angles and not curves, made efforts to extend striping or other changes over them appear to be forced. So the units were wrapped on the sides and ends; the roof areas, trucks and underframes were touched up with black paint to match the existing paint. The wraps are expected to last for a minimum of seven years. For the GP40, a key design piece was fabricating as-delivered EMD number boards; a non-NJ Transit railroad official made sure that they looked exactly as they did when they left EMD’s La Grange, Ill., plant in 1968. NJ Transit officials expect the Pennsylvania unit to enter revenue service in a few weeks. The Erie Lackawanna locomotive will operate on NJT’s positive train control test train. The GP40H-2, currently used as a switcher, will have head-end power equipment installed and be used in revenue service. All three units are PTC equipped. NJ Transit continues to explore options including the possibility of more heritage locomotives operating next year.
  13. Courtesy of Trains magazine: KEARNY, N.J. — NJ Transit provided the first public look and more details on its three heritage locomotives on Tuesday, and did not rule out the possibility that more such locomotives could follow. The locomotives were unveiled Saturday at the agency's Family Days event for employees. [See "NJ Transit reveals heritage locomotives," Trains News Wire, Oct. 5, 2019.] The project evolved as part of discussions among several NJ Transit managers who noted how other railroads and airlines used heritage paint schemes to mark anniversaries. A mix of paint and wraps were used to note the lineage of the commuter rail operations that became part of NJ Transit. The three engines — Bombardier ALP-46A electric No. 4636, now wearing a Pennsylvania Railroad scheme; dual-mode Bombardier ALP-45DP No. 4519, commemorating Erie Lackawanna, and EMD GP40H-2 diesel No. 4109, returned to a version of its as-delivered Central of New Jersey scheme — were chosen because of their specific maintenance cycles and their need to be repainted. The GP40H-2 had last been painted in 1992. When the project was approved, Deputy General Manager of Mechanical Equipment Charlie Tomaszfski assembled a team of carmen, mechanics, laborers, and shop workers to prepare and decorate the locomotives, extending a collaboration that also involved senior and executive-level staff members. Contacts within the railroad industry and with railroad historical societies provided technical assistance with paint colors, fonts, and striping details. For the two Bombardier locomotives, 60% of the heritage scheme utilizes a vinyl wrap, with the design of those wraps a collaboration between NJ Transit and the historical societies. The GP40PH-2 was repainted into a scheme reasonably consistent with its original version, using some logo and lettering decals. After drawings for the designs of the wraps were reviewed internally and externally, Reidler Railroad Graphics of Saint Clair, Pa., supplied and installed the wraps and lettering. Conrail, the owner of the Pennsylvania and Eric Lackawanna names and likenesses, entered into a licensing agreement allowing their use and reviewed the conceptual drawings. On both the Bombardier ALP-46A and ALP-45DP units, the black “sideburn” sections on the previous paint jobs house blower and electrical runs that require the areas to be unencumbered during maintenance cycles. These areas, defined by hard angles and not curves, made efforts to extend striping or other changes over them appear to be forced. So the units were wrapped on the sides and ends; the roof areas, trucks and underframes were touched up with black paint to match the existing paint. The wraps are expected to last for a minimum of seven years. For the GP40, a key design piece was fabricating as-delivered EMD number boards; a non-NJ Transit railroad official made sure that they looked exactly as they did when they left EMD’s La Grange, Ill., plant in 1968. NJ Transit officials expect the Pennsylvania unit to enter revenue service in a few weeks. The Erie Lackawanna locomotive will operate on NJT’s positive train control test train. The GP40H-2, currently used as a switcher, will have head-end power equipment installed and be used in revenue service. All three units are PTC equipped. NJ Transit continues to explore options including the possibility of more heritage locomotives operating next year.
  14. KEARNY, N.J. — NJ Transit unveiled three heritage locomotives Saturday at its annual Family Days event at its Meadows Maintenance Complex, and is scheduled to debut the locomotives for the general public on Tuesday. The three locomotives are GP40PH-2 No. 4109, repainted to a version of the Central of New Jersey livery it wore when first delivered in 1968; Bombardier ALP-46A No. 4636, an electric locomotive painted into a Pennsylvania Railroad scheme; and dual-mode Bombardier ALP-45DP No. 4519, with an Erie-Lackawanna paint scheme. NJ Transit, which is celebrating its 40th anniversary, initiated its heritage program earlier this year with the debut of a set of bilevel coaches wrapped to honor its predecessor railroads. [See “NJ Transit unveils six heritage commuter cars,” Trains News Wire, July 17, 2019.]
  15. I have place this topic on both MTA NYCT bus forum and NJ Transit forum respectively. MTA currently has electric buses while NJ Transit will have an order for electric buses arrive nextyear in Camden for pilot testing. I think NJ Transit should've started their first pilot testing of electric buses in Jersey City from routes based out of Greenville garage. Courtesy of Metro Magazine. Electric bus use is growing, with nearly half of municipal buses on the road globally expected to be electric by 2025 and the size of the U.S. electric bus market projected to reach $1.95 billion by 2024. With all this change in the (cleaner) air — amid growing environmental concerns, legislation mandating electric vehicle adoption, low maintenance costs, and funding and tax incentives — transit companies that aren’t already using electric buses would do well to consider planning how to integrate them into their fleet. Though the infrastructure for electric vehicles needs to be taken into consideration, including issues such as which batteries to use and where charging stations should be located, integrating electric vehicles into a fleet is about much more than hardware. The underlying challenge is that electric buses have different needs than diesel ones — perhaps most significantly, they need recharging more often than diesel buses require refueling — and that makes efficient scheduling both more complicated and more necessary than ever. Here are three important factors that transit agencies, operators and schedulers should consider when thinking about incorporating electric buses into their planning and scheduling: Charge times Introducing electric buses into transit systems requires operators to consider how charge times affect the planning and scheduling of bus routes. It’s essential for operators to figure out each vehicle’s range limits and the minimum charging requirements for each route, which dictate the level of energy needed for a given trip and the amount of spare energy required. Charging time for each battery type must also be considered. Since electric buses need more recharging than diesel buses, some drivers may face range anxiety, the fear that the vehicle won’t have enough juice to make it to the end of the route. The goal here is to schedule buses in a way that alleviates range anxiety while also getting the most value out of the vehicles by keeping them on the road while incorporating charge times into the schedule at the right junctures. To do that, it’s important to build a charging strategy that answers questions such as: What’s the range and minimum battery capacity for a given trip? For example, a bus with 70% remaining charge could have a remaining range of 45 miles and remaining time of 4 hours and 20 minutes. Once you know the baseline, the schedule can take that into account. What’s the maximum widespread? The duration of a break at the depot is more significant for electric buses than diesel ones, since it dictates the potential for increasing the vehicle’s charge. How many recharging events do you want to have? For instance, if you have multiple short charging events instead of long charges, you may be able to keep a vehicle at a lower remaining charge if you know it will be recharged shortly. But in some circumstances it may be better to charge just once at night. What kind of batteries and chargers are used for each vehicle? Important variables include the type, capacity and discharge rate of the batteries as well as the battery types supported by the chargers and their charging rate. Cost Charging electric buses comes with a new set of cost considerations for transit operators. There’s a lot of interplay between cost and charging times, since bus schedules must take into account both the amount of time electric buses need to charge and the time of day they do so. Introducing electric buses into transit systems requires operators to consider how charge times affect the planning and scheduling of bus routes. BAEThe cost of electricity changes over the course of a 24-hour period, and also varies based on the day of the week and the season. This means that transit companies can exert some control over operational costs for electric buses by timing their charging events accordingly, but must be careful to take into account the demand charges imposed by electric utilities at peak times, which can have a significant impact on cost. Cost can also be affected by the type of recharging event, whether for longer periods during off-peak hours or shorter bursts throughout the day. The lifetime cost of electric buses is lower than diesel buses, despite the demand charges and the higher initial cost of electric buses, a Columbia University electric bus analysis for New York City Transit found. The savings are due to lower operational costs, including maintenance and charging. In addition, battery costs are expected to decline in the coming years, further lowering the overall cost of ownership. Fleet size Just as charge time scheduling can affect cost, it can also affect peak vehicle requirements and overall fleet size, since there need to be enough vehicles to allow for quick rotations as one bus gets charged and another moves into active use. Analyzing multiple scheduling scenarios makes it easier to experiment in order to find the one that best meets needs like reducing PVR. For example, we used two different charging strategies to see how the length of the charge time would affect the peak vehicle requirement for a hybrid fleet with six diesel buses. We found that when two full, long charges were scheduled per day, the peak vehicle requirement came to nine buses. But it dropped to eight buses with partial recharges that averaged out to four short bursts of energy a day. Charge times, cost and fleet size are important factors to take into account when planning how best to integrate electric vehicles into a bus fleet. Once these factors are expressed as preferences and constraints, sophisticated scheduling platforms can optimize electric miles by creating efficient schedules that eke the most value out of each bus.
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