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  1. Does anyone have any opinions on how Jack Khzouz is running operations versus how things were done under Michael Setzer?
  2. https://www.nicebus.com/About-NICE/Job-Opportunities Open Positions: https://transdevna.jobs/garden-city/new-york/usa/jobs/
  3. Does anyone know if/when the rolling stock of the train is planned to be upgraded out of the current R62A fleet? Are there any publicized plans for that?
  4. User

    Hello

    Hello everyone, thank you for having me here! I look forward to seeing you all around and having further discussions on a range of topics.
  5. About 11 percent of Nassau bus riders have downloaded NICE's new mobile fare payment application in the two months since its release. Since its June 3 launch, Nassau Inter-County Express' GoMobile app, which allows customers to pay bus fares using their smartphones, has been downloaded about 6,700 times, NICE officials said. As of July 25, customers have used the app more than 21,000 times, and bought nearly 9,000 tickets, according to NICE. GoMobile has also received strong reviews from users. The app has averaged a rating of more than 4 out of 5 from both Apple iOS and Android users. It's obviously very early and we're still in the rollout phase, but we're really happy with all the numbers and all the indicators," NICE spokesman Jack Kzhous said Tuesday. "It's all about trying to improve the riders' experience and make it easier to travel." Read More: Source
  6. I went to an Aerosmith concert last Thursday. Photos aren't the greatest as they were taken with my phone, but you get the idea. The theater was packed and the concert was great. Leaving the theater though, I saw this. There was a long line to get on the 2nd bus where the driver was just sitting inside. There are more than two buses needed for packed concerts like this, and they should consider adding n87 service to the concerts as well. Not only that, but as I was driving up the Meadowbrook leaving the concert, the exit to Sunrise Hwy westbound was closed due to construction (from like 10pm to 5am) and I guess NICE didn't know that because the first bus heading north pulled over to the side of the road right before the exit (it actually stopped a bit short and almost caused an accident) and probably called dispatch for a detour.
  7. I wanted to wait until somebody answered the question wrong. It's not a driver, its a NICE dispatcher. The dispatchers were trained by Masabi reps to use the equipment and how to troubleshoot any issues so they could help drivers and pass on the training. Masabi reps are here and there on NICE property and buses, but for the most part, their beta with NICE is over.They also don't have the time to train 800 drivers, but NICE dispatchers have the time and its their job to work with these drivers. Once the scanners are fully working and drivers are comfortable with them, they're going to be installed on more and more buses.
  8. The MTA has found at least five defective subway rails since Tuesday during stepped-up inspections prompted by last week’s F-train derailment. Two of the broken rails were found on F tracks about 30 blocks from the derailment site in Woodside, Queens. A rail is classified as “broken” even if it has a fracture. “Finding them is normal especially when we’re doing extra runs of the inspection cars,” spokesman Adam Lisberg said. “It doesn’t mean there are more broken rails. It means we are finding more.” Transit officials and sources said broken rails were found on the F line near 36th St, in Queens; the No. 7 line near Willetts Point; the D line near 62nd St., Brooklyn; and the Q line at Stillwell Ave. in Coney Island, Brooklyn. Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/mta-found-defective-subway-rails-article-1.1783945#ixzz31SpJ9kXx
  9. Text-to-911: What you need to know (FAQ) Beginning May 15, wireless carriers in the US will uniformly and voluntarily support Text-to-911, a program that lets you send text messages to emergency services as an alternative to placing a phone call. While carriers will climb on board, this just means they're making the service available -- the ability to text the police in an emergency situation won't work everywhere in the country the second May 15 rolls around. On the flipside, some counties have already embraced the program, usually working with a single carrier. Here are some important things to know about texting 911. What is Text-to-911 and how does it work? Text-to-911 is a free program for sending a text message addressed to "911" instead of placing a phone call. To use it, you address the message to 911 and enter the emergency in the body of the text, making sure that you also add your exact location -- or else emergency services won't be able to dispatch help your way. Since it's all SMS-based, you will hear a response for more follow-up questions, or when help is on the way. Who is Text-to-911 for? Text-to-911 is useful for any situation in which it is dangerous or impossible to speak. Texting is also a useful way to help the younger demographic that feels more comfortable texting than calling. Kent Hellebust, a vice president at TCS, a company that sells texting management software to emergency call centers, told CNET of an incident in which a ten-year-old girl was able to successfully get help by texting 911 -- apparently composing a text felt more automatic and natural than dialing in. Which carriers support it? By May 15, Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint will support texting 911. Other carriers could also join in the future. Will it work where I live? Although the carriers have committed to supporting 911 texting in their service areas, that doesn't mean that text-to-911 will be available everywhere. Emergency call centers, called PSAPs (Public Safety Answering Points), are the bodies in charge of implementing text messaging in their areas. These PSAPs are under the jurisdiction of their local states and counties, not the FCC, which governs the carriers. In other words, it's up to the call centers to receive and dispatch your texts. Until the PSAP in your county first requests Text-to-911 support, implements the technology, and trains its staff, you won't be able to use texting in an emergency. However, some individual emergency services centers are ahead of the curve and already work with carriers to accept emergency texts. An example of how emergency call centers might receive 911 texts. TeleCommunication System Inc. (TCS) How do I know if my county uses it?The FCC lists the states and counties currently using Text-to-911 (PDF). What happens if my local call center isn't equipped to take my text?If your local 911 call center doesn't yet have the tools for text reporting, you'll receive a bounce-back text, so you know it hasn't gone through. Do emergency texts receive priority? That carriers treat SMS messages to 911 like any other text message, so your texts will be subject to the same service speeds or delays, depending on network strength in your area. Does Text-to-911 replace regular 911 calls? No; in fact, the FCC stresses that texting to 911 should be thought of only as a last resort, in the event that you can't speak. The FCC advises that people who are hard of hearing, deaf, or speech-impaired should still encouraged to use TTY for calling when they can. Is it text-only? What about sending photos and video at a scene? For the moment, Text-to-911 accepts written words only, though telecommunications agencies and companies are working toward Next-Generation 911, sometimes called NG911 for short. The goal is to modernize equipment and procedures at the emergency call centers (PSAPs), starting with photo messages and eventually including video messages as well. We're likely several years away from sending video messages to 911. Who governs Text-to-911 exactly? Text-to-911 is a program run by the FCC (Federal Communications Commission), in partnership with US carriers. Other telecommunications organizations -- like NENA, APCO, and the lobby group CTIA -- also have an interest in the program. That said, it's the individual counties and states that determine when they give texting the green flag, and how exactly they do it.
  10. What an a**hole... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rsH5VHRaT6M
  11. Message from Veolia/NICE CEO In 2014, we will launch exciting new technical advances and upgrades. These upgrades will allow us to measure key indexes more precisely and gather data on our performance in real time with extensive analytics. Additionally, the technology will allow deployment of real time information which customers can access with their smart phones, or see in large format screens similar to airports at Hempstead Transit Centers, which will display real time bus arrival. The upgrades also include smart phone based fare payment methods. Nassau Inter-County Express, or NICE bus, will become one of the first U.S. bus transit systems to offer riders smartphone ticket purchasing with its new, free GoMobile mobile fare payment app for iPhone and Android. For several days this April, dozens of NICE bus riders volunteered to help NICE test the new system and get it ready for launch this coming summer. NICE held multiple 50-minute “beta testing” sessions designed to help it refine and finalize the app. Customers loaded a test “GoMobile” app on their phones that will allow them to go live (testers only) on May 6. Testers will use the app for about one month while providing input and feedback to NICE. Our GoMobile app will be a great way for NICE to connect with its customers and provide them additional convenience. We think our customers will embrace mobile ticketing as they have in other transit systems around the country. All these upgrades will give our Team the tool necessary to continue our overall system improvements. Our workforce of 1000+ employees are committed to providing the Citizens of Nassau County a Safe and Dependable Public Transportation system. These new technology upgrades will support our efforts as we proudly serve the Citizens of Nassau County. http://www.nicebus.com/Nassau-Veolia-Partnership/Message-from-the-Veolia-NICE-CEO.aspx
  12. Nassau County, April 22, 2014 - This Earth Day, Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano and NICE Bus were recognized for their efforts in reducing Nassau County’s Carbon footprint through the green purchasing of natural gas. In acknowledging their continued support of Nassau County’s Carbon reduction projects, the Hess Corporation presented two plaques to the County and NICE Bus for helping to save the environment. The Hess Corporation also provided the County with 250 miniature Bamboo plants for distribution to residents in recognition of Earth Day. County Executive Mangano stated, “In 2010, my administration entered into an agreement with the Hess Corporation to achieve energy and cost savings. In addition to the significant savings for taxpayers, natural gas is the cleanest, readily available fuel for large buses and trucks, so using natural gas has and will continue to provide real, quantifiable reductions in the pollutant emissions - helping to further Nassau County’s commitment to protecting and saving our environment.” The Carbon offset of the natural gas used to fuel Nassau County’s Bay Park Wastewater Treatment Plant and NICE Bus brings Nassau County 20% closer to neutralizing carbon emissions. The carbon reduction for the County alone is 6,472 tons of Carbon-offsets annually and approximately 6,538 tons of Carbon-offsets for Veolia Transportation. This Carbon reduction over the life of Nassau County’s contract with Hess will be greater than 52,000 tons of Carbon-offsets. Link: http://www.longisland.com/news/04-22-14/mangano-nice-bus-win-green-award.html
  13. NEW YORK (WABC) -- As a part of the city's effort to reduce traffic-related deaths, the MTA mandates its bus operators undergo a rigorous safety training program. Over the coming weeks, a number of aspiring bus operators will undertake this intense work to become an MTA bus operator, with training Superintendent Gus Gonzalez carefully watching over their shoulders throughout the process. "Safety is always our number one priority," said Stephen Vidal, the MTA Vice President of Transportation, Safety & Training. "Safety, service, then schedules." The danger is even greater in an age when pedestrians are absorbed in cell phones and music through headphones and other drivers are no less distracted. "It's a major challenge for operators to be aware of what their surroundings are and that a distracted pedestrian is a step away from walking in front of the bus," said Vidal. Public safety on the streets is the focus of the city's "Vision Zero" initiative to end traffic deaths and injuries. MTA officials point to their training results to demonstrate their commitment to accident prevention. In 1988 there were 92 collisions per million miles. A steady decline over two decades led to 46 collisions per million miles last year. "We're constantly trying to build programs that will drive that number down to zero," added Vidal. One program employs a state-of-the-art bus simulator, where veteran operators like Jason Salazar sharpen their skills. "He really gets an opportunity to say I could have done this differently and hopefully the result is that he has a successful session," explains Vidal. The simulator is not just for veteran bus drivers, though. Eyewitness News' own Tim Fleischer demonstrated that even novice bus drivers learn through the simulator proving that it is no easy task by slamming on the brakes and thumping a disabled car during his simulation. If the MTA can run a sophisticated training program to lower the number of accidents, the question lingers: can other agencies with fleets follow suit? Vidal said the program has already drawn interest. "We have actually met with folks from the Department of Transportation 'Vision Zero' group and they were intrigued with our concept of preventability," said Vidal. That prevention begins when operators first start driving and continues after years on the job. Link (with Video): http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?section=resources/traffic&id=9512300
  14. NJ Transit’s former railroad chief, who was pushed out in March following two tumultuous years that included the flooding of nearly 400 rail cars and locomotives during Superstorm Sandy, has landed a job within New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Kevin O’Connor, the former vice-president of rail at NJ Transit, started April 10 as Metro-North Railroad’s new chief transportation officer, according to Aaron Donovan, spokesman for Metro-North, a division of the MTA that provides rail service in suburban New York and Connecticut. O’Connor spent 11 years at NJ Transit, first as general superintendent of New York Penn Station and later, deputy general manager of transportation. He was named vice-president of rail in 2011 and was credited by the agency for coordinating various station operations with Amtrak. But O’Connor came under intense public scrutiny in 2012 after Superstorm Sandy flooded hundreds of NJ Transit rail cars and locomotives that had been left to sit in low-lying, flood prone rail yards. Documents and emails revealed that NJ Transit did not follow a plan to move the equipment to higher ground, and instead left the rail cars and locomotives in the vulnerable yards in Kearny and Hoboken as Sandy approached. The damage to the equipment was upwards of $120 million. In February, the Christie Administration shook up NJ Transit, replacing former executive director Jim Weinstein with Ronnie Hakim – herself a onetime former special counsel at the MTA. Hakim dismissed O’Connor and Joyce Gallagher, NJ Transit’s former vice-president for bus operations, within weeks. Both left NJ Transit on March 21, according to John Durso, Jr., agency spokesman. Hakim, he said, “indicated her desire to begin a new chapter in the agency’s history, and we thank Joyce and Kevin their service and contributions to NJ Transit.” Durso said NJ Transit is seeking “a transportation-themed executive search firm to lead the search” for their replacements. Metro-North President Joseph Giulietti, in a written statement, expressed confidence in O’Connor. “I have known Kevin for decades and like many in the railroad industry, I have the utmost respect for his operational skills, his leadership and his management abilities,” said Giuletti, who took leadership of Metro-North in January. “He has 37 years of experience with Amtrak and NJ Transit, both of which are partners with Metro-North, and we will benefit from his long experience.” Donovan said O’Connor was not available for an interview Tuesday. He said O’Connor is taking over the duties of Metro-North Vice President John McNulty, who is retiring this summer. Link: http://www.northjersey.com/news/ex-nj-transit-rail-chief-who-was-ousted-lands-job-with-ny-s-metropolitan-transportation-authority-1.997017#sthash.zvyW5vF8.dpuf
  15. New York City’s newest subway line is still years from opening, but the Second Avenue Subway is coming. Phase One is expected to be completed in 2016 and will run from East 96th Street to East 63rd Street. When finished, the entire subway line will connect 125th Street to the Financial District. Patrick Cashin, a photographer for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, has been tracking the work on the Second Avenue Subway beginning in 2009. Since joining the MTA in 2000, Cashin has also documented the agency’s work on projects like East Side Access and Superstorm Sandy recovery efforts. Through it all, Cashin gets to see the city in a way most of us never will. His photographs of the underground work seem otherworldly and surreal, a stark contrast from the view above ground. “You walk down through the tunnel and bam, you walk into the 72nd Street cavern. And it just blows you away because it’s just so big and so huge,” Cashin told reporter and anchor Jack Ford about the Second Avenue Subway project. ”Now it’s starting to look like a station. Before it was just all rock and mud and dirt, but now they’ve got the walls up, they’ve got the ceiling up so it’s beginning to look like a train station.” The dust and construction above ground are all many New Yorkers know about the new subway line. “Second Avenue, because it affects the community so much, they actually have tours for the community, for the residents in the community to go down there. To see their faces when they come off the elevator, it’s like they had no idea. I mean, they’re inconvenienced and they get the noise and the dust,” Cashin said. “So to see the look on their faces, it’s just a big wow factor.” Cashin has also climbed to the top of the Robert F. Kennedy bridge, the Bronx-Whitestone bridge, and the Verrazano-Narrows bridge. When reporter and anchor Jack Ford asked Cashin if he ever felt scared climbing that high, he said that the camera gave him “a false sense of security”. “You do the grip and grins and you photograph the t-shirts just so you can get to the top,” Cashin said. “You got to do the crummy jobs to get to the good jobs.” On his last trip up the Verrazano-Narrows bridge, Cashin photographed the 2013 New York City Marathon. “It’s always a little different looking down and seeing all those people running across the bridge.” Link: http://www.thirteen.org/metrofocus/2014/03/the-mtas-subways-bridges-and-tunnels-through-the-eyes-of-an-mta-photographer/

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