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Parking 'grace' gets ok


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But Mike vows veto

By DAVID SEIFMAN, City Hall Bureau Chief

 

Brushing aside a stern warning from Mayor Bloomberg that they were inviting "chaos," the City Council yesterday added a five-minute grace period to virtually all parking regulations.

 

But even before the vote, Bloomberg slammed the legislation as "misguided" and vowed to veto it.

 

"A five-minute grace period is only going to lead to chaos, an enormous increase, I think, in contested tickets and arguments," the mayor argued.

 

"Whose watch are you going to use? And the Sanitation Department, when do they start removing cars so they can clean the streets?"

 

But the new rules passed by an overwhelming 47-2 margin, and Council Speaker Christine Quinn -- usually a Bloomberg ally -- declared her members will "absolutely" override the veto.

 

The new regulations -- which would take effect 90 days after the council overrides the mayor's veto -- would allow motorists at Muni-Meters to park an extra five minutes.

 

The grace period won't apply at other meters that don't give paper receipts.

 

Drivers rushing to move their vehicles to comply with alternate-side changeovers would also get the extra five minutes, as would all others except those cited for safety violations, such as parking in front of a hydrant.

 

Parking violations -- excluding those for going through a red light -- brought in $560 million in revenue to the city in fiscal 2009. The projection for this year, fiscal 2010, is $629 million.

 

Councilman John Liu (D-Queens), the comptroller-elect, said as much as the city needs the money, parking agents should give drivers a break. "Don't be standing there getting the person at 8:01 a.m.," he said.

 

Several legislators have complained for years that their constituents are being buried under mountains of parking tickets.

 

Councilman Simcha Felder (D-Brooklyn) said that 28,000 of the 1.4 million summonses given out for alternate-side violations in 2008 were written at the exact minute the regulation kicked in and another 276,000 were written within five minutes.

 

"We are passing laws for the purpose of making sure the city has a little . . . common sense and decency when they issue tickets," said Felder.

 

david.seifman@nypost.com

 

 

Figures Iron Mike Bloomberg would be against this!!!

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I don't really like this, in a few years when people get used to the extra time they will want more time. It's the whole "if you give a mouse a cookie" thing.

 

Then it'll be their own fault when they get a ticket showing up 6 minutes late. 5 minutes is reasonable. Anything else is not. I've been burned by this once or twice, as have my folks. One time, I got a ticket after the end of alternate side, presumably because the officer's clock said it was still in effect. It's a reasonable cushion that accounts for differences in clock timing as well as people who get down to their car a minute or two late. No complaints here. It's about time laws were made based on "common sense" rather than broom-up-the-butt iron-clad, "it must be this way or else...well except if you have a disability, or except if you have a purple vehicle weighing more than 4500 pounds, or except if [other exemptions here]". The last 10 years have shown that common sense rules with rough guidelines work better than very technical laws with lots of loop holes.

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Then it'll be their own fault when they get a ticket showing up 6 minutes late.

 

So people should show up to their car 5 or so minutes before the time is set to expire. I have never gotten a ticket for being at a meter too long because that is what I always do. If you stay at the meter after time expires, you deserve that ticket whether your late by 1 minute of 10.

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So people should show up to their car 5 or so minutes before the time is set to expire. I have never gotten a ticket for being at a meter too long because that is what I always do. If you stay at the meter after time expires, you deserve that ticket whether your late by 1 minute of 10.

 

Enforcement is much different in Manhattan, trust me on that...

 

Besides, are you really agreeing with that idiot Bloomturd?

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Enforcement is much different in Manhattan, trust me on that...

 

Besides, are you really agreeing with that idiot Bloomturd?

 

Enforcement in Manhattan and Downtown Brooklyn/Park Slope is very much the same. In fact, Park Slope now has peak hour parking where you are charged more for less time.

 

As for agreeing with Lord D-Bag, n this case yes. There should be no grace period since parking is at a premium any way. This could also cause people to think twice about taking their car to these areas and increase the use of public transit.

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Enforcement in Manhattan and Downtown Brooklyn/Park Slope is very much the same. In fact, Park Slope now has peak hour parking where you are charged more for less time.

 

As for agreeing with Lord D-Bag, n this case yes. There should be no grace period since parking is at a premium any way. This could also cause people to think twice about taking their car to these areas and increase the use of public transit.

 

I think the focus should be more on nailing double parkers and increasing the penalties for them. I'm fine with the 5 minute rule. As for enforcement they sometimes play dirty. In one example, my father was blocked in by their vehicle in a restricted spot as he went to move the car, and as soon as their clock said it was time, she gave him a ticket. Naturally it got thrown out when he contested it and he didn't have to pay, but my father still didn't get his half day of work back.

 

As for increasing use of public transit there are other and better ways to do it IMO. It would be great if they were able to get a rule passed saying that non NY drivers (commercial plates would be excluded) could not park in city streets, but I'm sure people would complain about that and prevent it from happening. They could also start charging different tolls over the bridges/tunnels for 1) single passenger vehicles or 2) non commercial vehicles or 3) both

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Freakin finally! Those traffic agents are all nuts going on a ticketing spree especially Manhattan to fill their quotas. I say: 'take that!'

 

You aint' kidding, The other day I got hit for $115 for double parking, man that hurt, these guys are like roaches there everywhere

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You aint' kidding, The other day I got hit for $115 for double parking, man that hurt, these guys are like roaches there everywhere

 

They're scum. Most of them would write their own mothers.

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Totally true. It's all about the damn quotas. They don't give a damn if you were away from the car for one minute or if it was some emergency [wheeling a person into the hospital]. Bloomberg is lucky he's reelected now, cuz I don't think those few voters would've supported him on this issue.

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That still doesn't excuse how traffic agents are like vultures that will ticket the very second the meter expires. I mean sure someone can purchase a spot for like an hour, but what if something comes up that they end up like 2-4min late?

The blame cannot go to only the people.

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