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metsfan

A serious question for all members

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How many of you see freight sidings, often un-used, especially spur lines, that you could see working as a storage track or possible location for a new and well placed train station?

 

Every time i ride on the :nec: i see literally countless spurs that are no longer used that (NJT) (SEPTA) and amtrak could EASILY use for train storage and/or a new train station.

 

Also, i don't understand why some stations, such as monmouth junction on the :nec: sit abandoned when tons of people would use it.

 

I think some more focus should be paid to passengers who aren't "nine to fivers" going to and from work. Use of these sidings to put trains in the gaps between full line runs would be appreciated by thousands a month.

 

Also, how about some trains that end at priceton junction when the dinky isn't there and turn around at the nearby interlocking.

 

I know some of this is very location specific, but its based on my own personal experience. I openly welcome other examples and ideas that relate to this idea!

 

- Andy

Edited by metsfan
fine-tune

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The tracks that run through Manhattan from the old New York & Harlem Railroad could be used for something.

 

 

Where are these?

 

- Andy

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Where are these?

 

- Andy

 

I can't remember exactly where they are. It's been years since i last saw them. Maybe someone else can shed a little light on the subject.

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I see so many, and like you said, they're countless. But I don't really pay no mind to them.....unless I see something strange sitting on them.

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The main point here is, that if (NJT) and other transit entities all over utilized some of these sidings, they would not have to worry so much about train storage at the ends of the lines. I mean, jersey ave yard is a perfect example of what i'm talking about. It's right in the middle of (NJT)'s portion of the :nec: and can store like 5-6 trains plus 1 or 2 at the jersey ave station itself. If we focused for example (again just going on my personal experience) it would make a whole lot of sense to park a few trains at the MMC for a newark to princeton junction run.

 

Even Amtrak could get in on the action and have special "in between" trains to reduce wait times, and because its not a full line run profitability wouldn't be at risk because they'd not be without that train later in the day as they might be on a Boston-DC run. How about trains that just go between major stops, like new york to philly, or New london CT to Boston etc etc.

 

Via rail in canada has access to similar sidings as their lines are hugely freight oriented in some spots, though still having abandoned/unused/underused ROW.

 

In europe, japan, and parts of mainland asia, there's the issue of space, so i am not sure and not familiar with how well this idea would work, but it'd work in uk and australia and even parts of africa that need more train service.

 

I would love some input from folks who might have experience in other transit systems outside the usa. I mean, if the tracks are there, why not use them!

 

- Andy

 

The tracks that run through Manhattan from the old New York & Harlem Railroad could be used for something.

 

I figured out what you meant. That trackage is to be converted into a planted walkway from LIRR's west side yard to 14th street.

 

It used to be a freight line but only saw a few years of serious use till robert moses decided to tear all of the elevated railways down in manhattan that he could get his hands on. It now abruptly ends at 14th street in the slowly dying meat packing district. That area is now becoming abandoned & retailers and condo converters are moving in to the abandoned sections.

 

It used to see see steam trains if you can imagine that. A web of elevated tracks carried steam trains pulling passengers or freight though half of manhattan's streets. Pretty interesting image if you can even picture it!

 

- Andy

Edited by Pablo M 201

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I figured out what you meant. That trackage is to be converted into a planted walkway from LIRR's west side yard to 14th street.

 

It used to be a freight line but only saw a few years of serious use till robert moses decided to tear all of the elevated railways down in manhattan that he could get his hands on. It now abruptly ends at 14th street in the slowly dying meat packing district. That area is now becoming abandoned & retailers and condo converters are moving in to the abandoned sections.

 

It used to see see steam trains if you can imagine that. A web of elevated tracks carried steam trains pulling passengers or freight though half of manhattan's streets. Pretty interesting image if you can even picture it!

 

- Andy

 

Yeah i think that's it!

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The tracks that run through Manhattan from the old New York & Harlem Railroad could be used for something.

 

I figured out what you meant. That trackage is to be converted into a planted walkway from LIRR's west side yard to 14th street.

 

It used to be a freight line but only saw a few years of serious use till robert moses decided to tear all of the elevated railways down in manhattan that he could get his hands on. It now abruptly ends at 14th street in the slowly dying meat packing district. That area is now becoming abandoned & retailers and condo converters are moving in to the abandoned sections.

 

It used to see see steam trains if you can imagine that. A web of elevated tracks carried steam trains pulling passengers or freight though half of manhattan's streets. Pretty interesting image if you can even picture it!

 

- Andy

 

Yeah i think that's it!

 

Would that be the High Line, or something else?

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Would that be the High Line, or something else?

 

Yes. I fully plan to trespass erm i mean visit there as soon as it looks ok to do so and snap a few photos. They are in the middle of removing the ballast rails etc. Maybe i'll ask a construction worker steada sneakin in. I don't feel like being arrested.

 

 

But back to the main point. Does anyone know of a freight siding or spur area that could be transformed into a station? Or even an abandoned station that should be rebuilt? (NYCT) alone has like 20 abandoned stations along its 5 main routes (including those served by (NJT)) in its MNRR trackage. (NJT) has like 15 or so, some were moved though like the one in asbury park on the :njc:. The old one and new one are like a mile apart & the old one is still there. LIRR also has its share of abandoned stations including whole abandoned lines that could be re-opened for expanded service. Even (SEPTA) has its share of abandoned serviceable areas as you've seen from my coverage of the R8 in and around newtown.

 

(NJT) has the lackawana cut-off which has so many abandoned stations its not even funny. That and the line from west trenton, which used to see passenger service to newark, sharing part of the modern day :rvl:.

 

I really am wanting some input on this from everyone, because there is just so much rail out there that is underutilized or de-activated its such a waste.

 

- Andy

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Yes. I fully plan to trespass erm i mean visit there as soon as it looks ok to do so and snap a few photos. They are in the middle of removing the ballast rails etc. Maybe i'll ask a construction worker steada sneakin in. I don't feel like being arrested.

 

 

But back to the main point. Does anyone know of a freight siding or spur area that could be transformed into a station? Or even an abandoned station that should be rebuilt? (NYCT) alone has like 20 abandoned stations along its 5 main routes (including those served by (NJT)) in its MNRR trackage. (NJT) has like 15 or so, some were moved though like the one in asbury park on the :njc:. The old one and new one are like a mile apart & the old one is still there. LIRR also has its share of abandoned stations including whole abandoned lines that could be re-opened for expanded service. Even (SEPTA) has its share of abandoned serviceable areas as you've seen from my coverage of the R8 in and around newtown.

 

(NJT) has the lackawana cut-off which has so many abandoned stations its not even funny. That and the line from west trenton, which used to see passenger service to newark, sharing part of the modern day :rvl:.

 

I really am wanting some input on this from everyone, because there is just so much rail out there that is underutilized or de-activated its such a waste.

 

- Andy

 

Somebody had the idea of making the High Line into an extension of the (7)... too bad that never came to pass.

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Somebody had the idea of making the High Line into an extension of the (7)... too bad that never came to pass.

 

There would have been NO way to do that (at least in a cost effective way), because the (7) is the deepest line at times square. I don't think there would be a way to bring it up and turn it in the space on the west side. You got the (A)(C)(E), the holland tunnel interchange, PABT ramps, and the empire tunnel & cut in the way.

 

- Andy

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