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vsizzle

LIRR/MNR Locomotive Engineer

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How often does this position pop up for people to apply? Is it like NYCTA every 5 years? Do you have to already be in the system to apply or can outside people who want to get in apply as well? Does anybody know when the next time this position will pop up? Or do I have to send my resume to a specific place for this type of employment.

 

Thanks to all who apply.

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whats the difference in duties between a locomotive engineer and a train operator? does the locomotive engineer have to fix the train when it breaks down? does he/she need a degree in engineering?

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This position only becomes available to those who aren't currently employed by the agencies maybe once every 10 years as they prefer to promote within for the position. Not only that, but you would also need a minimum 5 years full-time work experience.

 

Locomotive Engineers have to be licensed by the FRA and must successfully renew their license every year.

 

You'd be better off going for Assistant Conductor and learn the vast system from the middle first before going up front.

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Engineer is in charge of controlling the movement of the train, the conductor is in charge of the whole train, engineer is under him/her, so is assistant conductor.

 

Ticket collectors are not conductors, even if they have the title. Every train has an engineer who physically controls the train's movements on the track & is responsible for reporting issues to the conductor, and a Conductor, who oversees all operations & delegates people to certain tasks, ie operating the trap doors for low level stop, or resetting the e-brake if activated, and in emergencies is in charge of evacuating the train.

 

Fare collectors/ticket collectors deal with properly collecting fares and tickets, and making sure every passenger pays the appropriate fare, or has a pass etc. If someone does not have the proper fare, they consult the conductor, who will decide if you're off at the next stop, or allowed to proceed.

 

Conductors can and do often aide the engineer in reversing a train if the need arises during a rev move. The conductor all most always rides in from the yard with the engineer, sometimes the rest of the train crew board at the first station after the yard, depending on crewing patterns. Sometimes they do a yard turn or a simple turn, or a direction change after reaching terminal station.

 

Engineers & Conductors are responsible in tandem with good operational state of the motive power, be it EMU or DMU or electric or diesel locomotive. He/she starts the locomotive, and shuts it down in a lot of cases. Parking a train is not a skill people will instantly have or acquire, you will need to work it every time, because every consist is different, different age of the wheels, brake wear etc.

 

It's a job heavy with procedure and responsibility, good news is though usually you can wear reasonable street clothes. :cool:

 

Good luck in your quest, and heed the advice of people with the knowledge & experience, on this forum & elsewhere. :tup:

 

- A

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LIRR is like every 4 or 5 yrs they will recruit and what they have been doing lately is allowing people off the streets to apply since the testing and training part is very difficult. But your best bet is to get into the system first no matter what the title is from Assistant Conductor ,to Block operator or even Car appearance maintainer because even if you fail you always have the chance to apply again and you still keep your title in the LIRR as to coming off the streets and going back to the streets.But just as in any job in this recession, once the economy turns around then many of the senior workers retire and things start opening up. Same goes for the MNRR but they only recruit in house and now what I'm hearing is that the MNRR is overloaded with Engineers so they aren't going to be looking anytime soon but as for Assistant Conductors they recruit just about every year. Good luck and Apply ,Apply Apply is the key..

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Ticket collectors are not conductors, even if they have the title. Every train has an engineer who physically controls the train's movements on the track & is responsible for reporting issues to the conductor, and a Conductor, who oversees all operations & delegates people to certain tasks, ie operating the trap doors for low level stop, or resetting the e-brake if activated, and in emergencies is in charge of evacuating the train.

 

Conductors can and do often aide the engineer in reversing a train if the need arises during a rev move. The conductor all most always rides in from the yard with the engineer, sometimes the rest of the train crew board at the first station after the yard, depending on crewing patterns. Sometimes they do a yard turn or a simple turn, or a direction change after reaching terminal station.

 

Within the LIRR and MNCR, the title of "ticket collector" does not exist.

 

You can have up to four different titles on a single train. You have the Engineer (who could be diesel qualified or non-diesel qualified), a Conductor (one per train, can be more than one on board if Asst C/R's are short, but only one is considered "in charge"), an Assistant Conductor (can be 0, 1 or 2 per train) and a Brakeman (one per train, also responsible for collecting fares.) The Conductor is in charge and resolves all problems either with or onboard the train and it is the Brakeman who rides layups into sidings and yards.

 

The title of Assistant Conductor is a temporary title and is only a stepping stone to the full Conductor title; you cannot stay at the position of Asst C/R. Once hired as an Asst C/R, you will have five years and seven chances to pass the Conductor's exam which is, essentially, a blank piece of paper and pencil. You will have to draw the system on which you are working on. For example, if you're taking the LIRR exam, you will have to draw the system, every signal, every switch, every tower, every track, every siding, from the West Side Yard to Montauk. 80% is passing.

If you fail your first four chances, you will be taken out of service without pay and not be allowed to return to work until you pass it. If you fail the test seven times, or fail to pass the test within the five year period, you will be returned to your prior title, or will be terminated if you were hired from the street.

 

So if you think that the Conductor's exam is difficult, you could imagine how the Engineer's exam is.

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why is such a large team of people needed to control a commuter train and only 2 (soon to be 1) to control a subway train? other than fare collection i mean

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why is such a large team of people needed to control a commuter train and only 2 (soon to be 1) to control a subway train? other than fare collection i mean

 

Because railroads are regulated while transit systems are not.

 

The biggest difference from an engineer on LIRR and MNR is that they make ALOT more money and have ALOT less responsibility. All they do is move the train that's it!! They don't prepare the train for service, trouble shoot problems, or check the ground if a problem arises. The conductor does all of that but in the TA the T/O does it plus more.

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WOW, that last statement couldnt be further from the truth, a Locomotive Engineer has ALOT less responsibilty than a T/O??? I guess thats why an engineers training program is only 15 months long, cause all they have to do is have to learn how move a train....

 

So when a train is out in Montauk and has stuck brakes or a broken brake pipe after hitting debris the engineer just sits there and waits for help lol cause they are not trained on how to troubleshoot a problem. If you were out in montauk, an engineer would be waiting a LONG LONG time for help. The engineer in reality is the most qualified crew member, especially when it comes to air brake systems and troubleshooting problems, they do work in a team with the conductor, but they are usually looking to the engineer to fix the problem and get the train moving

 

And i guess when they have a speed control failure, they just stop their train (the only thing they know how to do) and wait for someone to come and rescue them or if a there is a problem with a diesel engine,or dual mode maybe they ask passengers for help with troubleshooting the engine

 

Believe me i understand being a T/O in the subway has a lot of resposibilty but dont assume that a locomotive engineer for a commuter railroad is less responsibilty, like i said earlier that couldnt be any further from the truth

 

I think maybe you should talk to a Locomotive Engineer for the LIRR or Metro-North and find out how intense their training was before making stupid assumptions

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Ohh and when LIRR engineers run 50 cars of freight or even passenger trains for that matter, i guess they dont prepare the train for service out of the yard, and set out cars and couple and uncouple engines, and perform brake tests, maybe ticket clerks take care of that since engineers only know how to move the train and thats it lol

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No need to be sarcastic, just post what the job duties are if what Jah posted is wrong.

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WOW, that last statement couldnt be further from the truth, a Locomotive Engineer has ALOT less responsibilty than a T/O??? I guess thats why an engineers training program is only 15 months long, cause all they have to do is have to learn how move a train....

 

So when a train is out in Montauk and has stuck brakes or a broken brake pipe after hitting debris the engineer just sits there and waits for help lol cause they are not trained on how to troubleshoot a problem. If you were out in montauk, an engineer would be waiting a LONG LONG time for help. The engineer in reality is the most qualified crew member, especially when it comes to air brake systems and troubleshooting problems, they do work in a team with the conductor, but they are usually looking to the engineer to fix the problem and get the train moving

 

And i guess when they have a speed control failure, they just stop their train (the only thing they know how to do) and wait for someone to come and rescue them or if a there is a problem with a diesel engine,or dual mode maybe they ask passengers for help with troubleshooting the engine

 

Believe me i understand being a T/O in the subway has a lot of resposibilty but dont assume that a locomotive engineer for a commuter railroad is less responsibilty, like i said earlier that couldnt be any further from the truth

 

I think maybe you should talk to a Locomotive Engineer for the LIRR or Metro-North and find out how intense their training was before making stupid assumptions

I agree, without the attack. Engineers do a lot more then just move trains. I also like to add you have to be certified for different zones as well.Like in zone A in which Amtrak controls you have to go about their rules and regulations in which is more training included FRA and LIRR standards.

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Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 2_2_1 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/525.18.1 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/3.1.1 Mobile/5H11 Safari/525.20)

 

Ohh and when LIRR engineers run 50 cars of freight or even passenger trains for that matter, i guess they dont prepare the train for service out of the yard, and set out cars and couple and uncouple engines, and perform brake tests, maybe ticket clerks take care of that since engineers only know how to move the train and thats it lol

 

The engineers don't prepare the trains the conductor does. I agree the training is alot harder but the overall responsibilities are much less. I get this from a good friend who is a locomotive engineer with LIRR. There job is to move the train!

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