Jump to content
Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.
Sign in to follow this  
mark1447

Tunnel lighting question

Recommended Posts

Ive been always why tunnel lighting has two metal[or sumin] triangular covers over the light bulb under Rivers but when its not under river its 1 cover for the light bulb [Example IRT Lenox Line 135th to 96th St]. Is it becuz trains sometimes run on another track during G/O which makes it hard for the t/o to see or sumin?

 

If you know what i mean. If you dont let me know!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ive been always why tunnel lighting has two metal[or sumin] triangular covers over the light bulb under Rivers but when its not under river its 1 cover for the light bulb [Example IRT Lenox Line 135th to 96th St]. Is it becuz trains sometimes run on another track during G/O which makes it hard for the t/o to see or sumin?

 

If you know what i mean. If you dont let me know!

 

This is common in places where trains run in both directions so the T/O does not get blinded. An some areas though, the same lights with two refelctors are hung from the celing or the wall near a switch so that there is more light directed on it. This helps the T/O "read the iron" and aids signal and track gangs when they work on the switch. AS you said, in river tubes there are 2 reflectors and areas such as the 4th Av line between 95th Street and 59th Street as GOs often have trains "wrong raling".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for bringing this up Mark! I never got the chance to do so and always thought that the lighting consisted of single light bulbs just to save money since graffiti thugs used to destroy them. My mom used to tell me that the subway tunnels in the 80s was extremely dark with just a few light bulbs in each stretch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is common in places where trains run in both directions so the T/O does not get blinded. An some areas though, the same lights with two refelctors are hung from the celing or the wall near a switch so that there is more light directed on it. This helps the T/O "read the iron" and aids signal and track gangs when they work on the switch. AS you said, in river tubes there are 2 reflectors and areas such as the 4th Av line between 95th Street and 59th Street as GOs often have trains "wrong raling".

 

Thanks for explaining. I also wanted to ask is why when a subway exits the tunnel for EL/Viaduct and so has loads of tunnel lightening before it comes out as an EL and when it comes into the tube as a subway? Does it mean the train is ether becoming EL or Subway. Just curious on whats the point.

 

Thank you for bringing this up Mark! I never got the chance to do so and always thought that the lighting consisted of single light bulbs just to save money since graffiti thugs used to destroy them. My mom used to tell me that the subway tunnels in the 80s was extremely dark with just a few light bulbs in each stretch.

 

I was going to post this months ago but was to lazy to ask and thought no one would know. But sum1 knows his things above your post :(.

 

As for the darkness in station parts of the CPW line south of 125th is heavily dark with the older lightening not working. And QBL.

 

Most Lines such as IRT Broadway/7th Ave/Lex[Except parts of Midtown]/Flushing/WPR/Jerome/4th Ave/Brighton/BMT Broadway/Nassau has its lighten, just needs to expand more..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you for bringing this up Mark! I never got the chance to do so and always thought that the lighting consisted of single light bulbs just to save money since graffiti thugs used to destroy them. My mom used to tell me that the subway tunnels in the 80s was extremely dark with just a few light bulbs in each stretch.

 

Tunnel lighting is a very new thing for the system, and OSHA report a few years ago found that coal mines are better illuminated then the subway. The New tunnel lighting uses a form of compact fluresents while older lighting found on the IND used bare bulbs with a sheet metal shroud to prevent blinding to M/M. I don't know if the IRT or BRT/BMT originaly had lights in the tunnel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for explaining. I also wanted to ask is why when a subway exits the tunnel for EL/Viaduct and so has loads of tunnel lightening before it comes out as an EL and when it comes into the tube as a subway?

 

I believe that's to ease the transition on the eyes for operators since if they go outside the sunlight can be near blinding after being underground and they need to be able to see ahead of them obviously. You'll notice the lights are mostly covered so that the T/O never looks directly at a bulb but rather just sees the light they give off, so it won't cause the same effect the other way when going into the tunnel...just allows the eyes to being to adjust naturally for a few seconds so the switch from dark to daylight or vise versa isn't sudden

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tunnel lighting is a very new thing for the system, and OSHA report a few years ago found that coal mines are better illuminated then the subway. The New tunnel lighting uses a form of compact fluresents while older lighting found on the IND used bare bulbs with a sheet metal shroud to prevent blinding to M/M. I don't know if the IRT or BRT/BMT originaly had lights in the tunnel.

 

I know that the BMT was definitely the darkest in the dark times of the 60s-80s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I believe that's to ease the transition on the eyes for operators since if they go outside the sunlight can be near blinding after being underground and they need to be able to see ahead of them obviously. You'll notice the lights are mostly covered so that the T/O never looks directly at a bulb but rather just sees the light they give off, so it won't cause the same effect the other way when going into the tunnel...just allows the eyes to being to adjust naturally for a few seconds so the switch from dark to daylight or vise versa isn't sudden

 

You are correct, thats why they are turned off at night.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slightly off topic, but I recall 15th Street-Prospect Park 70(F) (F)(G) had this unique orange lighting in the 1970's. It was the color of the $500 note in the Monopoly Game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's important that there is light reflecting off the rails so T/O or engineer can see if there's a problem. Not always possible though.

 

- A

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is why i like PATH lighting better... probably more efficient while being brighter at the same time.

 

ya when im in the PATHs hudson tunnel, it looks like some scary movie thru the PA4 RFW. Seems a bit to dark tho

 

@Drew Thx for clarifying! Tho final add on, can lighting also be added to elevated structure or viaduct? Cuz I see on the Culver Viaduct the Blue lights for phone is there. Since its dark at night and a bit hard to see, even with street lighten. Tho i dunno if its not on an EL cuz of rain...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PATH lighting is that way, because trains are more easily stuck in the mostly underground ROW, and it aids in track work efforts, while also reducing the brightness requirements for car interior lighting. I believe it used to be caged sets of incandescent bulbs.

 

- A

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ya when im in the PATHs hudson tunnel, it looks like some scary movie thru the PA4 RFW. Seems a bit to dark tho

 

@Drew Thx for clarifying! Tho final add on, can lighting also be added to elevated structure or viaduct? Cuz I see on the Culver Viaduct the Blue lights for phone is there. Since its dark at night and a bit hard to see, even with street lighten. Tho i dunno if its not on an EL cuz of rain...

 

There not needed on the El because when you are in the cab, you operate with out kight on so the headlights really light up the path in fornt of you. As you said, blue lights are for emergency phones and have nothng to do with regular tunnel lighting. The only reason you see the blue light, is so it can be found if needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember that back in the fifties, cars like the R9's and older cars, didn't have sealed beam headlights and the "headlight's" were more like marker lights with clear lenses, that gave off a very dim beam. Motormen in those days had to really have excellent vision to see the rails. When newer cars came out with sealed beam lights, it sure made a difference. And the older cars were retro-fitted with them as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.