Jump to content
Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Trainspotter

Train derails in Pakistan, killing 58

Recommended Posts

Train derails in Pakistan, killing 58

MEHRABPUR, Pakistan (AP) — An express train crowded with holiday travelers derailed in southern Pakistan on Wednesday, killing at least 58 people and leaving hundreds of terrified survivors to claw their way out of the wreckage in total darkness.

 

The train, which derailed at about 2 a.m., was loaded with an estimated 900 passengers, many of them heading home for the Islamic holiday of Eid ul-Adha.

 

Full story: NJ.COM icon_offsite.png - December 19, 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Train derails in Pakistan, killing 58

 

 

Full story: NJ.COM icon_offsite.png - December 19, 2007

 

Is that holiday equal to Christmas, they day their prophet Muhammad (or Jesus as we Christans and Catholics call him) was born?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pakistan lowers train crash toll to 40

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) — Authorities lowered the death toll Thursday from a train derailment in southern Pakistan as the damaged rail lines were repaired, allowing services to be restored at the height of the holiday travel season.

 

Fourteen of the 16 cars on the Karachi Express train jumped the tracks before dawn Wednesday as the crowded passenger train headed from Karachi, capital of southern Sindh province, to the eastern city of Lahore, mainly carrying passengers heading home for the Islamic holiday of Eid al-Adha.

 

Officials initially reported at least 58 dead from the crash near Mehrabpur, a town about 250 miles north of Karachi. But Junaid Qureshi, director of operations for state-run Pakistan Railways, revised the casualty figures to 40 dead and 269 injured, mostly in two cars that were turned into mangled metal and debris.

 

Full story: NJ.COM icon_offsite.png - December 20, 2007

 

1198138149101590.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is that holiday equal to Christmas, they day their prophet Muhammad (or Jesus as we Christans and Catholics call him) was born?

 

Actually, no. It is the festival of sacrifice, commemorating Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son for Allah.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Actually, no. It is the festival of sacrifice, commemorating Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son for Allah.

 

His son Isaac, the same one in the Holy Bible (Bib-lay)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
His son Isaac, the same one in the Holy Bible (Bib-lay)?

 

The son in question is not named in the Qur'an. Traditionally, in both Jewish and Islamic circles, it is understood to be Ishmael (the son by his wife Hagar), not his son Isaac (by his wife Sarah). Ishmael is considered the ancestor of all Arab people, whereas Abraham through Isaac is considered the ancestor of all Jews.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The son in question is not named in the Qur'an. Traditionally, in both Jewish and Islamic circles, it is understood to be Ishmael (the son by his wife Hagar), not his son Isaac (by his wife Sarah). Ishmael is considered the ancestor of all Arab people, whereas Abraham through Isaac is considered the ancestor of all Jews.

 

Either way as we both can see, they all come to Abraham. We (the major religions) all have something in common. None of our religions (Jewish, Muslim, Catholic, and Christianity) are that different. They all go back to the same source. We just choose to worship by different names, ways, and affection. Some are more into their religious practices than others.

 

We did get way off the topic, didn't we?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We did get way off the topic, didn't we?

 

I'm finding it rather interesting. As long as we respect each others opinions I don't see any problem with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Either way as we both can see, they all come to Abraham. We (the major religions) all have something in common. None of our religions (Jewish, Muslim, Catholic, and Christianity) are that different. They all go back to the same source. We just choose to worship by different names, ways, and affection. Some are more into their religious practices than others.

 

That's very true. Catholicism, just in case you're unsure, since you listed the two separate, is still Christianity. Roman Catholics still believe in a Trinity, and affirm that Jesus Christ is the son of God. The major difference between Catholicism and other Christian denominations (Protestant and Greek Orthodox) is that Catholics have only one source of dogmatic authority: the ecclesiastical hierarchy of the pope and the bishops, whereas Protestant churches believe in the autonomy of each individual community of worshipers.

 

We did get way off the topic, didn't we?

 

Sure, but I don't mind, so long as we respect each other's traditions and/or beliefs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's very true. Catholicism, just in case you're unsure, since you listed the two separate, is still Christianity. Roman Catholics still believe in a Trinity, and affirm that Jesus Christ is the son of God. The major difference between Catholicism and other Christian denominations (Protestant and Greek Orthodox) is that Catholics have only one source of dogmatic authority: the ecclesiastical hierarchy of the pope and the bishops, whereas Protestant churches believe in the autonomy of each individual community of worshipers.

 

 

 

Sure, but I don't mind, so long as we respect each other's traditions and/or beliefs.

 

Christianity broke off from Catholicism, then many denominations came out of that. I was told that I was Baptized, does that make me Baptist? I have marks on me from Holy water, and when I touch it now, it burns. IT REALLY REALLY BURNS!

 

I love learning of others religions, and practices. Things like that interest me. That's why I watch so much History, Dicsovery, Learning, and A&E documentaries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Christianity broke off from Catholicism, then many denominations came out of that. I was told that I was Baptized, does that make me Baptist? I have marks on me from Holy water, and when I touch it now, it burns. IT REALLY REALLY BURNS!

 

I love learning of others religions, and practices. Things like that interest me. That's why I watch so much History, Dicsovery, Learning, and A&E documentaries.

 

Actually, not quite. The Greek Orthodox Schism of 1054 was when the Eastern church split from the Roman (Catholic) church. The Protestant Reformation came in four phases, when each of these branches split from the Roman Catholic church: [1] Lutheran; [2] Calvinist; [3] Radical; [4] Anglican.

 

[1] The Lutheran Church (known as the Evangelical Church outside of America), is a denomination based on the theology of Martin Luther.

 

[2] The Calvinist Church rarely exists to this day under that name, other than in western Europe. It is known, in America (and Scotland), as either the Presbyterian or Congregationalist church, and it follows the theology of John Calvin. A particular, more anti-Catholic wing of this Calvinist church emigrated to America in 1620, under the name Puritan. The mainstream Puritan church split into three groups by 1750, and they all survive to this day. The "liberal" stream became known as the Unitarians; the "moderate" stream as Congregationalists; and the "conservative" stream as Baptists.

 

[3] The "radical" branch, also known as the Anabaptist, include those attempts at "utopian" communities which still exist in America today. These include the Amish, the Hutterians, the Mennonites. (Mormons and Christian Scientists might also properly belong in this category, although their classification is slightly more vague).

 

[4] The Anglican church was formed when King Henry VIII rebelled against the pope for denying him a marriage annulment, and declared that his state was no longer in communion with Rome. An American form of this church exists today, under the name Episcopalian. The Methodist branch, formed by John Wesley around 1780, also follows in this tradition.

 

As far as I know, virtually all Christian denominations practice baptism, so if you were baptized, it is no indication that you are a Baptist. I was baptized, and I am a Catholic.

 

If you've got any further questions - feel free. As you might have guessed, I'm a theology major.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How about these Christian Zionists and their crazy beliefs?

 

I believe that they are most likely to self-define simply as "Christians", without any particular denominational affiliation. They might even flatly reject the "Protestant" label, although that is definitely what they are. Most academics would consider them a part of the third [3] stream of reform, or the "radical" branch. As I pointed out, this stream of reform does not conform uniformly to a particular theological movement. In layman's terms, this category is sort of a "catch-all" category, which includes those Protestant denominations (like the Zionists) which are neither mainline nor evangelical.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.