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Broadway Local

The Alstom Propulsion Difference between a R160A and R160B

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If anyone of you guys have good listening (which most of you have), and you've heard the Alstom Propulsion R160A and R160B, some of you guys can hear a sound difference between the two.

 

Some of you think that it's a same thing but the R160B Alstom is more high-pitched than the R160A. Does anyone know what makes the R160B sound more high-pitched?

 

I tried looking at Wikipedia, it said they both have the same propulsion, but there's a sound difference between two cars. I'm just saying.

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I don't know, as I've never heard a difference. I always thought they were exactly the same, and I'm (really) attuned to train sounds :lol: . Can you possibly provide some youtube videos that show what you're talking about?

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If anyone of you guys have good listening (which most of you have), and you've heard the Alstom Propulsion R160A and R160B, some of you guys can hear a sound difference between the two.

 

Some of you think that it's a same thing but the R160B Alstom is more high-pitched than the R160A. Does anyone know what makes the R160B sound more high-pitched?

 

I tried looking at Wikipedia, it said they both have the same propulsion, but there's a sound difference between two cars. I'm just saying.

 

 

I understand what you're trying to say but you kinda got it confused. What you're thinking of is the R160Bs with the Siemens propulsion.

 

With the R160A, all cars have the Alston propulsion. With the R160B, only half of them have the Alstom propulsion whole the other half has the Siemens propulsion.

 

In theory, the R160A, R160B, and R160Bs with the Siemens propulsion can all run together (and they have before), but for practical reasons, the Alstom R160s (both A and B) run together while the R160Bs with the Siemens propulsion run on their own

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If anyone of you guys have good listening (which most of you have), and you've heard the Alstom Propulsion R160A and R160B, some of you guys can hear a sound difference between the two.

 

Some of you think that it's a same thing but the R160B Alstom is more high-pitched than the R160A. Does anyone know what makes the R160B sound more high-pitched?

 

I tried looking at Wikipedia, it said they both have the same propulsion, but there's a sound difference between two cars. I'm just saying.

 

 

The R-160A (8313-8712, 9233-9802, and 9943-9974) and R-160B (8713-8842, 9103-9232, and 9803-9942) subway cars both share the same traction motors manufactured by Alstom. The only difference is that the R-160B have 2 traction motors from Alstom and Siemens split into 2 different set of trains. Look up R-160 (New York City Subway car) on Wikipedia again, scroll down to 'Differences'; under it says "Between the R-160A and R-160B cars" and there's your answer.

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Then question is then which propulsion system provides more horsepower? I've always wondered...

 

Then question is then which propulsion system provides more horsepower? I've always wondered...

 

According to the T/O's that operate the trains, the Siemens motors supply slightly more power, thus resulting in a slightly faster train, but they brake horribly.

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According to the T/O's that operate the trains, the Siemens motors supply slightly more power, thus resulting in a slightly faster train, but they brake horribly.

 

Yup. Both the Alstom and Siemens R160s seem to have awful friction brakes, but the Alstom (unlike the Siemens) uses dynamic braking all the way down to 1 MPH so it still brakes well. The lowest note of the Alstom propulsion "music" :lol: is basically the speed at which there's no dynamic braking on the Siemens.
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