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DOB2RTO

Artic on ice

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This is what happens with artics on ice. 149st wasn't even plowed. It even happens to senior cats, which it did later on at 149st/Third Ave. Steering into the slide, or even backing up didn't help. A Superintendent came with a shovel and salt, and got me out. Seems camera from phone sucks to use at night.

 

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Great shots man! Thats Caarazzy! :D:eek:

 

Thanks. I still do see a noticeable difference using my camera phone at night (these pics), and day (5657 burnt bus pics). Also the pics I put in the gallery are better since they are day pics.

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Like you said, snow/ice and artics don't mix.

 

Which are the drive wheels on the artics? I'm guessing it is the second set of wheels.

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Like you said, snow/ice and artics don't mix.

 

Which are the drive wheels on the artics? I'm guessing it is the second set of wheels.

 

I'm tempted to say the third:confused:

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Like you said, snow/ice and artics don't mix.

 

Which are the drive wheels on the artics? I'm guessing it is the second set of wheels.

 

There are two types of artics, pusher and puller. NYCTA (New Flyer), Bee-Line (Neoplan), and NJT (also Neoplan) artics are rear wheel drive (3rd axle...aka 2nd unit). These are pusher types, as the back of the bus pushes the front part. Like I said before the rear left wheels (driver side) are actually the power wheels, and it transfers power to the right wheel. You can actually see the left wheel spin slowly, while the right rear wheels sit idle on snow/ice, if you release the parking brakes, and take your foot off the brake pedal.

 

The old Bee-Line MAN and NJT Volvos were puller types, and so are the new Van-Hool AG300s, in which the second axle was/is the drive wheels. So the front actually pulled the rear unit. These types are commonly known as tractor trailer type buses. They had the turnable wheels on the trailer part.

 

Pushers are not tractor trailer types, as the rear is the power unit, and the front is the trailer.

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You would be correct, sir.

 

That would explain why the slide so easily.You step on the gas the center of the bus just keeps heading for the sidewalk:rolleyes:

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That would explain why the slide so easily.You step on the gas the center of the bus just keeps heading for the sidewalk:rolleyes:

 

No acceleration is needed. Just like cars just taking ones foot off the brake, the vehicle will roll under its own power. Some of bus engines are so powerful, they will roll up hill without acceleration power.

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Great shots there!

 

Thanks, and as you can see in the first pic, the tire marks are where the wheels were. When you stop with those buses downhill, jackknifes happen. I tried to time the light so I didn't stop at it, but those cabs got in the way forcing me to stop, there. I even tried to let it roll slowly, but that light takes a year and a day to change sometimes.

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Yay! Looks like fun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOT!

 

Good thing I stayed away from Artic areas of NJ, that must've been fun for the transit........

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Can't see the video or pic.

Oh, theres nothing there. I didn't post a pic or vid or nothing. I just hit enter a few times to get a point through..........

 

Heh, oh well.

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