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R160 hull


Sam

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Is there something particular about the R160's hulls that prevents a thorough clean-up of grafitti? At first the grafitti was mostly on Eastern Division lines, but I'm seeing them on trains from the Jamaica Yard as well. The "clean-up" seems limited to ugly, unsightly blotches. Not even the R42s have it this bad.

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Is there something particular about the R160's hulls that prevents a thorough clean-up of grafitti? At first the grafitti was mostly on Eastern Division lines, but I'm seeing them on trains from the Jamaica Yard as well. The "clean-up" seems limited to ugly, unsightly blotches. Not even the R42s have it this bad.

Hull?

Subway cars have hulls?

I thought floating vessels have hulls.

Unless you are comparing an R160 to the Titanic!

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Is there something particular about the R160's hulls that prevents a thorough clean-up of grafitti? At first the grafitti was mostly on Eastern Division lines, but I'm seeing them on trains from the Jamaica Yard as well. The "clean-up" seems limited to ugly, unsightly blotches. Not even the R42s have it this bad.

 

To elaborate on what Bill said: Hull is a term used for ships and aircrafts. Trains have car bodies (or shells).

 

I don't know about the graffiti removal methods of today, but I can tell you that the R160 have the same stainless steel shells that the R42s have.

 

I've seen it on the R142s also, but eventually the blotches will disappear.

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I think it's becaused the surface is not smooth like other stainless steal cars. It's also why they get VERY dirty, when the wash at CIY was down the cars were gross.

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I think it's becaused the surface is not smooth like other stainless steal cars. It's also why they get VERY dirty, when the wash at CIY was down the cars were gross.

 

Yup, when it comes to the type of external finish the cars have, that comes into play as to how well they hold up to dirt and grime before they need a washdown.

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Sorry if I misinterpreted the word "hull"; I was looking at Star Trek and they mentioned damage to the hull!

 

If the car bodies of R160s are identical to other rolling stock, why is the removal of paint not as efficiently removed as the others? I just don't see the same degree of care. The R142s simply look dirty, not smudged with chemical solvents.

 

Maybe I'm making a mountain out of a molehill, but it's getting to the point that the R160s are looking real old even with the price tag flapping in the wind!

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Well, a spacecraft is a type of 'ship' or extension of the concept of an aircraft.

 

Technically speaking (etymologically), the term "hull" could fit a rail carbody, because it simply means "shell" or "covering". So I understood fully what it meant when I first saw the thread title.

But for whatever reason, the terms has become fixed to sea, air or space vehicles. (vehicles we cannot walk besides, and must live inside when traveling in their respective medium). It's connected with the consept of a "vessel", meaning "container". A train really does not fit that the way sea, air and space vehicles do. They're containing you by safely carrying you through a medium you could not navigate (for long at least) by your own feet.

 

Just like the space ship officers use the same rank names as the Navy. (Air Force officers don't probably because you do not live on the aircraft as long as sea or space craft).

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To elaborate on what Bill said: Hull is a term used for ships and aircrafts. Trains have car bodies (or shells).

 

I don't know about the graffiti removal methods of today, but I can tell you that the R160 have the same stainless steel shells that the R42s have.

 

I've seen it on the R142s also, but eventually the blotches will disappear.

the R160A and R160B have different steel finishes, so sometimes graffiti removal would look worse on one verses the other.

ENY cars blotches look terrible but they will fade, it needs a car wash and the blotches will be history. Jamaica is a different story they "file" off the graffiti leaving the steel looking scrapped and or faded. perfect example would be cars 9343-9347, 9844-9847, 9353-9355

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