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Jamaica Line

Just a couple of questions...

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Are T/Os allowed to take full control of the train whenever he/she wants, or only in emergency situations? There has to be days when T/Os are extremely bored and wish to take control. How do those T/Os feel about those runs?

 

Also, since this question wasn't answered in the Subway Random Thoughts Thread: Is it against the rules for a NIS train to have its interior lights off? I think I remember someone on here stating that, yet I see it all the time. Also, is it mandatory for T/Os to leave the cab light on in the NTTs once he has completed his run? If so, why? The light always seems to be on in the end cab of a NTT.

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Are T/Os allowed to take full control of the train whenever he/she wants, or only in emergency situations? There has to be days when T/Os are extremely bored and wish to take control. How do those T/Os feel about those runs?

 

Also, since this question wasn't answered in the Subway Random Thoughts Thread: Is it against the rules for a NIS train to have its interior lights off? I think I remember someone on here stating that, yet I see it all the time. Also, is it mandatory for T/Os to leave the cab light on in the NTTs once he has completed his run? If so, why? The light always seems to be on in the end cab of a NTT.

For the first question, are you talking about the (L) line? That is the only line where trains operate themselves.

 

As for the second question, the only time the cab light on an NTT stays on is when the T/O has made the cab an operating position. At all other times the light stays on. Now on an NTT, the passenger area lights and HVAC will shut off after 1 hour of the train being inactive.

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The HVAC and interior lights can be turned off, but will turn themselves off anyway after an hour. Also, any routes loaded into the system have to be cancelled out, making side signs blank (not even NIS is allowed to be displayed when trains are in yards, a rule that is seldom followed). Yes, the only time the interior lights are supposed to be off is outside (ie: structure or above street level running) for a significant length of time, period.

 

For ATO, when ATO is in effect, the T/O is not allowed to take manual control of the train unless ATO fails or the train enters an area where ATO isn't in effect (like a work area or if its raining when it comes out south of Bushwick Av). The T/O manually operates all other lines. When a break is needed, operators can put the train in full service brake (train stopped in station), allowing them to rest their hands. One of the reason T/O hates 68A is not only the brakes (big time braking ability, but delay in application), but also because it releases so slowly on some consists, that they basically have to hold down the deadman the whole way unless there's a punch or a red signal.

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The HVAC and interior lights can be turned off, but will turn themselves off anyway after an hour. Also, any routes loaded into the system have to be cancelled out, making side signs blank (not even NIS is allowed to be displayed when trains are in yards, a rule that is seldom followed). Yes, the only time the interior lights are supposed to be off is outside (ie: structure or above street level running) for a significant length of time, period.

 

For ATO, when ATO is in effect, the T/O is not allowed to take manual control of the train unless ATO fails or the train enters an area where ATO isn't in effect (like a work area or if its raining when it comes out south of Bushwick Av). The T/O manually operates all other lines. When a break is needed, operators can put the train in full service brake (train stopped in station), allowing them to rest their hands. One of the reason T/O hates 68A is not only the brakes (big time braking ability, but delay in application), but also because it releases so slowly on some consists, that they basically have to hold down the deadman the whole way unless there's a punch or a red signal.

 

Blanking out the signs is actually being enforced in CIY now. Most 160s have their signs shut off, but they have only started to do this recently.

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For the first question, are you talking about the (L) line? That is the only line where trains operate themselves.

 

As for the second question, the only time the cab light on an NTT stays on is when the T/O has made the cab an operating position. At all other times the light stays on. Now on an NTT, the passenger area lights and HVAC will shut off after 1 hour of the train being inactive.

 

The HVAC and interior lights can be turned off, but will turn themselves off anyway after an hour. Also, any routes loaded into the system have to be cancelled out, making side signs blank (not even NIS is allowed to be displayed when trains are in yards, a rule that is seldom followed). Yes, the only time the interior lights are supposed to be off is outside (ie: structure or above street level running) for a significant length of time, period.

 

For ATO, when ATO is in effect, the T/O is not allowed to take manual control of the train unless ATO fails or the train enters an area where ATO isn't in effect (like a work area or if its raining when it comes out south of Bushwick Av). The T/O manually operates all other lines. When a break is needed, operators can put the train in full service brake (train stopped in station), allowing them to rest their hands. One of the reason T/O hates 68A is not only the brakes (big time braking ability, but delay in application), but also because it releases so slowly on some consists, that they basically have to hold down the deadman the whole way unless there's a punch or a red signal.

 

Thanks a lot guys. And yea INDman, I was referring to the (L). That's why I added the word "hipsters" as one of the thread tags. :P

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The HVAC and interior lights can be turned off, but will turn themselves off anyway after an hour. Also, any routes loaded into the system have to be cancelled out, making side signs blank (not even NIS is allowed to be displayed when trains are in yards, a rule that is seldom followed). Yes, the only time the interior lights are supposed to be off is outside (ie: structure or above street level running) for a significant length of time, period.

 

For ATO, when ATO is in effect, the T/O is not allowed to take manual control of the train unless ATO fails or the train enters an area where ATO isn't in effect (like a work area or if its raining when it comes out south of Bushwick Av). The T/O manually operates all other lines. When a break is needed, operators can put the train in full service brake (train stopped in station), allowing them to rest their hands. One of the reason T/O hates 68A is not only the brakes (big time braking ability, but delay in application), but also because it releases so slowly on some consists, that they basically have to hold down the deadman the whole way unless there's a punch or a red signal.

What about the exterior lights? I always notice that they're on, even when the train is in the yard.. Are they supposed to be ?

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What about the exterior lights? I always notice that they're on, even when the train is in the yard.. Are they supposed to be ?

 

You mean the tail lights, yes those are always on

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the L has been on CBTC for quite a while now..i believe they've removed most of the signals on the line

 

why no ATO in the rain though?

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most likely for safety. Rain makes rails slippy which can cause a loss of traction and possible derailment.

 

I would love to see ATO operate a train in a snowstorm into Rockaway Pkwy coming into the stub ended terminal full blast like it does. (giggles at the lawsuits when the train ends up in the street)

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How exactly does the train know when to brake and how much braking effort to be applied?

 

So that pretty much defeats the purpose of automated trains, if the T/O still gotta apply the brakes. :confused:

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In case the train requires manual control in the event of a malfunction and for the terminals

 

I dont like the idea of a machine driving me on a subway. what happens when there's construction or there are workers on the track, does the motorman take over also?

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So that pretty much defeats the purpose of automated trains, if the T/O still gotta apply the brakes. :confused:

 

You misunderstood. I was asking how does the train itself know when to brake and how much braking effort to be applied.

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If the distance between station A and B is 1000 feet, when the train reaches 500 ft of travel it will start slowing down untill it reaches 1000 feet then stop. All the stations were calibrated for distance at one point. Thats why when the tech trains get re-routed the conductor or t/o has to do a station sync so you can re-calibrate the computer so it knows where it is so I can do proper station announcements.

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If the distance between station A and B is 1000 feet, when the train reaches 500 ft of travel it will start slowing down untill it reaches 1000 feet then stop. All the stations were calibrated for distance at one point. Thats why when the tech trains get re-routed the conductor or t/o has to do a station sync so you can re-calibrate the computer so it knows where it is so I can do proper station announcements.

 

Thanks, but what about arriving into slow stations such as Broadway Junction Manhattan bd? How does the train know how much braking effort to be applied?

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Thanks, but what about arriving into slow stations such as Broadway Junction Manhattan bd? How does the train know how much braking effort to be applied?

 

I guess if it going 20 miles an hour and the end of the platform is coming up, it will apply the amount of pressure needed to make that stop at the station car marker.

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The information about speed restrictions and safe speeds is stored in the CBTC/ATO equipment along the line and instructions are relayed to the onboard computer to regulate the speed of the train.

 

Realtime calculations are performed by the computer to adjust these speeds downward if the train is close to the one in front, to ensure the second train approaches the first at a safe speed.

 

The train operator is still there to apply the brakes in case of emergency, as well as perform various other functions that get into the minutia of ATO operation and are not nearly as interesting as buffs would have them be.

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