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mtattrain

Seoul Sagas: October 6, 2012 part one

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Train-racing and passing trains action:

 

This is a commuter train, and was surprisingly waiting on the metro/subway tracks of Guro Station...

 

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Heading west.... (away from Seoul) and waiting for express trains to pass at Sosa station:

 

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This line is the Suin Line, which actually opened on June 30, 2012... (not the date I visited this section):

 

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Scenery at the terminal of the new line, Songdo station:

 

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Heading east again, but not to Seoul yet:

 

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The new line, for now, ends where an already-existing line ends (Oido Station):

 

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This was a part of the old alignment of the new Suin Linementioned above, which was abandoned in 1994...

 

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Some junction action at Geumjeong station.... starting off with an abandoned platform:

 

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And some videos:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A videos of an incomplete station and some scrap trains... please enable annotations for details:

 

 

 

 

This is it for now, and stay tuned for part two of this trip! If you want to know the locations of the stations I have mentioned, please use this map for reference:

 

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Edited by mtattrain
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Right next to "나가는곳" and under "Exit" says "出口". That could be read as any Chinese dialect or Japanese (or Korean 한자). Which is the tertiary language on the multilingual signs?

Edited by CenSin
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Right next to "나가는곳" and under "Exit" says "出口". That could be read as any Chinese dialect or Japanese (or Korean 한자). Which is the tertiary language on the multilingual signs?

 

Chinese may be the tertiary language, since many Americans are coming in and because many Koreans are learning English.

 

Japanese signs are also present, (making it the 4th language) but are harder to find than the Chinese signs.

Edited by mtattrain
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Like in Japan where signs are in Japanese, English, Chinese and Korean.

What is the number and ratio of km above the ground and underground?

 

 

LMAO... That abandoned station looks better than most (MTA) subway stations... Smh

In Paris, our abandonned stations are full of graffiti and those stations are underground!  :lol:

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Like in Japan where signs are in Japanese, English, Chinese and Korean.

Four languages? I'll believe it when I see it.

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Four languages? I'll believe it when I see it.

Our trains' announcements surely have some announcements with Chinese and Japanese, but if I remember, it is super hard to find Japanese on subway signs.

Edited by mtattrain

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