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Track Geometry Car Inspecting Jay Street!


Maserati7200

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What exactly do these cars check for?

 

Warpage, tie imperfections, stress cracks, etc?

 

It checks if the track moves too much, and for proper alignment and position. The equipment does that. It also checks with a thermal camera for any hot spots or possible fires.

 

Rails rarely crack, they are very thick and strong, and often stay in service for longer than the equipment that rides on it.

 

Humans extinguish and remove any hot spot stuff, and visually inspect the tunnel for things out of place.

 

- A

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Rails rarely crack, they are very thick and strong, and often stay in service for longer than the equipment that rides on it.

 

True. Normal, straight rail inside a tunnel can last up to 65 years. Although some rails outdoors or on curves last shorter, sometimes as little as 25 years.

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Correct, usually they start to sag or erode away from friction and re-shaping machine.

 

To reduce flange friction on curves, a lot of places use flange greasers. If you've ever ridden the :nec:, you may have noticed those grey boxes on the ground with solar panels which are mounted on a metal pole coming from the box. The box contains a pump, and a huge container of grease. Special sensors activate the greasing, which is applied to every 4th or 10th or 20th etc wheel depending on various factors. The greasing area can be identified by the black tarp over the ballast & ties between the rails.

 

- A

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Correct, usually they start to sag or erode away from friction and re-shaping machine.

 

To reduce flange friction on curves, a lot of places use flange greasers. If you've ever ridden the :nec:, you may have noticed those grey boxes on the ground with solar panels which are mounted on a metal pole coming from the box. The box contains a pump, and a huge container of grease. Special sensors activate the greasing, which is applied to every 4th or 10th or 20th etc wheel depending on various factors. The greasing area can be identified by the black tarp over the ballast & ties between the rails.

 

- A

 

on a sharp curve, for example when the M turns into myrtle avenue station, does the wheel rub against the track as it turns and scrapes it? I have always wondered how does the train or any train at that make those sharp turns without scrapping the track

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Correct, usually they start to sag or erode away from friction and re-shaping machine.

 

To reduce flange friction on curves, a lot of places use flange greasers. If you've ever ridden the :nec:, you may have noticed those grey boxes on the ground with solar panels which are mounted on a metal pole coming from the box. The box contains a pump, and a huge container of grease. Special sensors activate the greasing, which is applied to every 4th or 10th or 20th etc wheel depending on various factors. The greasing area can be identified by the black tarp over the ballast & ties between the rails.

 

- A

That is also found on all other Freight lines as well as Amtrak but not in the NYC Subway System or other MTA systems.

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There are greasers all over the (NYCT), right before curves. If you have ever been on a train going around a curve and then it get quiet while still on the curve, it's because the trains passed a greaser.

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