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NYCTNostalgia

How come the M train was not double lettered in the 70's?

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The only difference between the M back then and the current M was that it ran as Brighton Local via Nassau instead of 4th Avenue/West End Local.

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That the 70(M) was. The 70(M) was express between Myrtle Avenue and Essex Street in the early 1970's just as the (J)(Z) do today.

 

The (MJ) Myrtle Avenue El which last ran October 4, 1969 was given a unique double letter. The letters stood for Myrtle-Jay (The line terminated in Downtown Brooklyn at Bridge-Jay Streets Terminal). The 1968 Rapid Transit Guide (subway map) shows the (MJ) route bullet which the Q Cars could not carry.

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(MM) was also reserved for a planned 57/6-Metropolitan service. So the 70(M) was the express (to Marcy) and the MJ and MM were to be the locals. The MM never ran, of course, the MJ was discontinued, and the 70(M) was eventually made all local, but by that time, they gave up on trying to keep the double letter system consistent.

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The only difference between the M back then and the current M was that it ran as Brighton Local via Nassau instead of 4th Avenue/West End Local.

This is correct,(M) trains were always Local throughout that period and now,as a Brighton local and now a 4 Avenue/West End Local.Be aware that (M) trains operated express as well between Pacific Street and 36 Street/4th avenue for a period during early 90's if my memory can serve me correctly.Does anyone remember that service pattern?

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The double letter system was proven to have gaps. Just like the interstate system have gaps (Ex: I-95 in NJ), the subway's double letter system had gaps. The (M) was always local yes it was a single letter. The (QB) was express but it had a double letter. The (NX) was also an express. Also, the diamond system had gaps as well. Remember the <R>? Where did it go express? What about the <5> used for Neeried Ext? That was local all the way. The diamond system was orgionally suppose to show rush hour express services not just rush hour service. That's why I'm glad the diamond letter system was done away with. Also the (Z) and (9) never got a diamond designation but they only ran rush hours.

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This is correct,(M) trains were always Local throughout that period and now,as a Brighton local and now a 4 Avenue/West End Local.Be aware that (M) trains operated express as well between Pacific Street and 36 Street/4th avenue for a period during early 90's if my memory can serve me correctly.Does anyone remember that service pattern?
I believe the M ran express, while the N ran local. However, relatively low ridership on the M ended that along with the fact that the B which goes into West End as well was an express.

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The double letter system was proven to have gaps. Just like the interstate system have gaps (Ex: I-95 in NJ), the subway's double letter system had gaps. The (M) was always local yes it was a single letter. The (QB) was express but it had a double letter. The (NX) was also an express. Also, the diamond system had gaps as well. Remember the <R>? Where did it go express? What about the <5> used for Neeried Ext? That was local all the way. The diamond system was orgionally suppose to show rush hour express services not just rush hour service. That's why I'm glad the diamond letter system was done away with. Also the (Z) and (9) never got a diamond designation but they only ran rush hours.

 

Its express from where the 2 and 5 split to where it meets up with the lexington line (I dont know the bronx line names too well)

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The double letter system was proven to have gaps. Just like the interstate system have gaps (Ex: I-95 in NJ), the subway's double letter system had gaps. The (M) was always local yes it was a single letter. The (QB) was express but it had a double letter. The (NX) was also an express. Also, the diamond system had gaps as well. Remember the <R>? Where did it go express? What about the <5> used for Neeried Ext? That was local all the way. The diamond system was orgionally suppose to show rush hour express services not just rush hour service. That's why I'm glad the diamond letter system was done away with. Also the (Z) and (9) never got a diamond designation but they only ran rush hours.

 

Diamonds were originally for rush hour; not necessarily express. Some rush hour services that were local did allow other services to run express, however (like the <B><C> arrangement uptown).

The "gaps" you mention are from later on, when the double letter system had lost its meaning and was no longer being strictly followed.

 

The 90's (as someone else mentioned) was well after double letters had been eliminated altogether!

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