Jump to content
Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Harry

Sick Passengers

Recommended Posts

I remember watching a report on Good Day New York about the number one reason why trains were delayed. It was sick women. Does anyone remember hearing this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard that too. Too much dieting and not eating enough that makes them faint in the subway. All that standing waiting for late trains.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OMFG I hate that bull crap about "Sick Passengers". They delay the train for like a god damn hour. I don't see what's so hard about getting a 'sick passenger' off, just call the ambulance or whatever, get them off the train, and get the train moving!! no need to make a big stink out of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OMFG I hate that bull crap about "Sick Passengers". They delay the train for like a god damn hour. I don't see what's so hard about getting a 'sick passenger' off, just call the ambulance or whatever, get them off the train, and get the train moving!! no need to make a big stink out of it.

 

I'll tell you why as an employee, and I hope you and others understand. Wheter on a train or bus, if a customer gets sick, the vehicle has to be safely stopped. The B/O, T/O, or C/R, has to call it in. We have to wait for the emergency services to show up. We have to call our control center, and someone (T/D or TSS for RTO, S/D or RSS for DOB) has to show up, before we go back in service. In the DOB we put the remaining customers on the following bus. We have to fill out paperwork, and give times of the incident, along with other passengers who witnessed the incident, especially the one who alerted the crew/operator. This stuff has to be documented. Why?

 

1. Is because the vehicle was already delayed by the sick passenger, which means that automatically blows up the line(s).

 

2. A vehicle not moving is making no revenue, for the system.

 

3. They need this stuff documented to protect from lawsuits, if the person who got sick dies. It might seem far-fetched, but as someone who took a little law in High School, it is not that hard to go into court and lie, by saying that the MTA employees took to long to call it in, and that is why my client died. Give me $100,000,000.

 

With other passengers saying they immediately told the crew, or operator, and the time it was called in (automatically recorded), they (MTA) can say they did all they could, got help immediately, and documenting it, shows they care. Putting the train/bus back into service immediately when the person is taken off, shows they don't care to some.

It's about public perception, and lawsuits have caused this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to work as a Paramedic in the city.

 

Got calls all the time for "customers", we called it subway syncope (fainting).

They were usually women, the dieting thing and sometimes the monthly "bill" thing.

I hated carrying the fat ones up all those stairs, but I do miss working in the city.

 

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'll tell you why as an employee, and I hope you and others understand. Wheter on a train or bus, if a customer gets sick, the vehicle has to be safely stopped. The B/O, T/O, or C/R, has to call it in. We have to wait for the emergency services to show up. We have to call our control center, and someone (T/D or TSS for RTO, S/D or RSS for DOB) has to show up, before we go back in service. In the DOB we put the remaining customers on the following bus. We have to fill out paperwork, and give times of the incident, along with other passengers who witnessed the incident, especially the one who alerted the crew/operator. This stuff has to be documented. Why?

 

1. Is because the vehicle was already delayed by the sick passenger, which means that automatically blows up the line(s).

 

2. A vehicle not moving is making no revenue, for the system.

 

3. They need this stuff documented to protect from lawsuits, if the person who got sick dies. It might seem far-fetched, but as someone who took a little law in High School, it is not that hard to go into court and lie, by saying that the MTA employees took to long to call it in, and that is why my client died. Give me $100,000,000.

 

With other passengers saying they immediately told the crew, or operator, and the time it was called in (automatically recorded), they (MTA) can say they did all they could, got help immediately, and documenting it, shows they care. Putting the train/bus back into service immediately when the person is taken off, shows they don't care to some.

It's about public perception, and lawsuits have caused this.

 

 

 

Thanks for the clarification. Now it makes sense to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I remember watching a report on Good Day New York about the number one reason why trains were delayed. It was sick women. Does anyone remember hearing this?

 

I remember that as well. It was also said on channel 11 mornin news.

 

 

 

... and DOB2RTO, that information is golden... thanks for the inside insight on that info !!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok here is the DOS RTO Proceedures when it comes to the Sick Customer. When the Crew is notified they will call the RCC (Rail Control Center). The train will hold in the station or next station for assistance to arrive. Then the RCC will ask the C/R if the customer can be moved on to the Platform. If the Answer is Yes they will tell the C/R to have the person walk over to the booth and wait by the Station Agent. If the Customer can't make it to the booth the C/R will have to remain on the Platfrom with the Customer until Help arrives. During that time the Train Operator will discharge the train and run light to the Terminal or pick up another C/R enroute. If the person can't be moved from the train it may or may not be discharged the train will just hold for assistance to arrive then go back in service when the person is removed from the train. I had about five sick customer in my career and they all stayed on the train so in all cases service was delayed. The worst case situation happened to me 2 Wks out as a C/R on a Manhattan bound # 2 train at 3 Ave/149 St. I got a report of a female fainted. I responed and found her on the floor. This was a Major blow to the # 2 train service because a G.O was in effect single track operation between 3 Ave 149 to Grand Concourse 149 St and service was just starting to move after a switch problem so I was the second Normal to go Manhattan bound and this incident stopped service again for Borth uptown and Downtown # 2 Train service. The #5 trains were suspended because of this G.O. I remember Control having a fit over this like I did something wrong. The had to split the # 2 Line in two section 1. E 241 Street to E 180 Street and 148 St Lenox / 96 St Bway to Flatbush Ave. The delay was a total of 45 Minutes.

This was my Welcome to NYCT with 2 Weeks as a C/R!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.