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FutureBusman

Ya'll wasn't lying

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To simply put it, get your CDL before you start training. Yo acela, that DMV instructor was a ****. Luckily however I passed the road test today....no check that...by the grace of GOD i passed today, because i seen some good drivers fail today. I'm the type of person who wants to see everyone pass. Hopefully they pass the second time around. Just being real ya'll. Nothing comes free....pay for that CDL.

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Some of these DMV examiners are miserable people, I should know from

experience because I had one of them when I took the CDL road test in Maspeth

on a school bus.

 

 

He yelled at me for running over the wheel chock

while I was doing my air breaks test, yes, I was nervous but he made me

even more so. This guy was short with a goatee and sunglasses with a bad

disposition, :mad:

 

There is one guy who is known as the "terminator" in the Bronx. :eek:

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Some of these DMV examiners are miserable people, I should know from

experience because I had one of them when I took the CDL road test in Maspeth

on a school bus.

 

 

He yelled at me for running over the wheel chock

while I was doing my air breaks test, yes, I was nervous but he made me

even more so. This guy was short with a goatee and sunglasses with a bad

disposition, :mad:

 

There is one guy who is known as the "terminator" in the Bronx. :eek:

 

LOL... God dammit... :mad: Friggin little rats... They're miserable because they're so non-existent in society outside of their little grading job.

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Yeah, FutureBusman, that damn examiner was a straight as*hole, and of course I went first and was able to give you guys the scoop on what to expect. I'm sad to see that only 3 of 6 of us passed today, by the grace of God himself.

 

But I agree- get your CDL before you enter training with MTA, that way you don't deal with the pressure of trying to pass on the first or second shot and fucC yourself in the long run.

 

Then again there's nothing wrong with a challenge, and today was just another one of those days. But we did it, no doubt.

 

Note to those in the future: lookout for the hispanic gentlemen as an examiner, as he's no friend of anyone, and a complete d-i-c-k ---- not exaggerating either.

 

But, anyway, we need to get that Bus Ops title under FutureBusman, and probably change your forum handle now, since you're currently that "Busman". lol

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Man dude was horrible. Two things that happened today While i'm approaching a curve I slowed down then he asked me to increase my highway speed. When I did, he said "why didn't you decrease your speed at the curve" But in my mind I was like you just told me to increase my speed wtf. So i just said YES SIR ,OKAY SIR. Then while approching a intersection i was slowing down because the don't walk sign was blinking for a very long time, so when i came close to the intersection he said" continue to proceed please ", as soon as he said the word proceed, the light turned red. I don't know if he was trying to make us fail on purpose but it certainly seemed that way.

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I was extremely upset with him telling me to "go at highway speed" and #9206 (from Fresh Pond) is governed at 35 MPH. He told me three times, and realized I'm already flooring the damn thing, and you can hear the governor kicking in. He must've felt like an a-s-s when he realized no one (the group) could reach the 50 MPH speed limit.

 

Douchebag.

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Man dude was horrible. Two things that happened today While i'm approaching a curve I slowed down then he asked me to increase my highway speed. When I did, he said "why didn't you decrease your speed at the curve" But in my mind I was like you just told me to increase my speed wtf. So i just said YES SIR ,OKAY SIR. Then while approching a intersection i was slowing down because the don't walk sign was blinking for a very long time, so when i came close to the intersection he said" continue to proceed please ", as soon as he said the word proceed, the light turned red. I don't know if he was trying to make us fail on purpose but it certainly seemed that way.

 

Re: stopping at a "stale" traffic light (One that's been green and the "don't walk" indicator is flashing. Here is the procedure:

 

Improper intersection management causes many a failure. Stopping at a light in the above stale green condition can also be considered a dangerous action. When you stop at a green light, what happens behind you? Operators of vehicles begin to attempt to pass you in any way they can. Confusion erupts. This can also cause a colission. In this country green means go! As you enter the previou block or when you leave a farside stop you immediately bring your eyes to the "don't walk" indicator at the next intersection not the light! Getting the early read on WHEN the indicator began to flash (stale green) will allow you to determine if you will be able to safely proceed through a solid green at the on-coming intersection. The procedure when approaching any intersection is to "Cover the Brake" when entering the final 1/3 of the block. (National Safety Councils 1/3 Rule.)

 

When you reach the "Point of No Return" approaching the near corner, you should already know by what I previously said about looking early at the "Don't Walk" indicator whether you will be able to enter the intersection covering the brake and safely continue and exit the interection safely. Guessing is not an option. You guess wrong, apply an abrupt brake and everyone is on the floor of the bus with "on-board" injuries. Not good!

 

Remember, as a professional you are responsible for entering, proceeding through and exiting the intersection without incident. Drive smart, take a mental snapshot of the block your entering and begin to "break things down" in your mind. This is true Forward Planning!

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LOL @ "By the Grace of GOD"

 

On a serious note I watch guys come into NJT and cant pass the road test because the instructor being a jackass.

 

I had got my cdl before hand before i moved from the bronx. And I walked into njt needing only to learn there way of driving and route training. Those road tests aint no joke. When I took mines the guy was a **** he tried everyway in the book to screw me up but i passed and when i left i told him to go **** himself.

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Re: stopping at a "stale" traffic light (One that's been green and the "don't walk" indicator is flashing. Here is the procedure:

 

Improper intersection management causes many a failure. Stopping at a light in the above stale green condition can also be considered a dangerous action. When you stop at a green light, what happens behind you? Operators of vehicles begin to attempt to pass you in any way they can. Confusion erupts. This can also cause a colission. In this country green means go! As you enter the previou block or when you leave a farside stop you immediately bring your eyes to the "don't walk" indicator at the next intersection not the light! Getting the early read on WHEN the indicator began to flash (stale green) will allow you to determine if you will be able to safely proceed through a solid green at the on-coming intersection. The procedure when approaching any intersection is to "Cover the Brake" when entering the final 1/3 of the block. (National Safety Councils 1/3 Rule.)

 

When you reach the "Point of No Return" approaching the near corner, you should already know by what I previously said about looking early at the "Don't Walk" indicator whether you will be able to enter the intersection covering the brake and safely continue and exit the interection safely. Guessing is not an option. You guess wrong, apply an abrupt brake and everyone is on the floor of the bus with "on-board" injuries. Not good!

 

Remember, as a professional you are responsible for entering, proceeding through and exiting the intersection without incident. Drive smart, take a mental snapshot of the block your entering and begin to "break things down" in your mind. This is true Forward Planning!

 

Did they factor in red light cameras? Green, yellow, red ,snap lol. Entering an intersection with a 40 foot bus on green can still get you snapped. No amount of foward planning can prevent that, ,unless you stop before the intersection or speed up and hope you don't have to brake abruptly because of thinking you got it when you really don't.

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Did they factor in red light cameras? Green, yellow, red ,snap lol. Entering an intersection with a 40 foot bus on green can still get you snapped. No amount of foward planning can prevent that, ,unless you stop before the intersection or speed up and hope you don't have to brake abruptly because of thinking you got it when you really don't.

 

You DON'Tstop at a solid green. You do the prep work before you get to the final third of the intersection. True professonals master this skill. You DON'T stop at a green and wait for the light to turn red. Keep doing this and just "watch how many pedestrians step off the curb and walk out in front of you and into the path of those vehicles that are still rightfully and legally moving on green to your left." Some of them will be the vehicles that moved around you in frustration of you stopping on a green. You DON'T stop at a solid green.

 

If you are doubtful about entering an intersection because you feel you will be facing a changing light, reduce speed before you get to the corner as the "Don't Walk" is flashing to allow the light to go red before you get there. Now you will have a solid red waiting for you to stop at and not a "green means go" light.

 

If I was the examiner and the testee stopped at a steady green, I would fail them immeditaely for creating a hazardous situation and failing to properly manage intersection approach and arrival.

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You DON'Tstop at a solid green. You do the prep work before you get to the final third of the intersection. True professonals master this skill. You DON'T stop at a green and wait for the light to turn red. Keep doing this and just "watch how many pedestrians step off the curb and walk out in front of you and into the path of those vehicles that are still rightfully and legally moving on green to your left." Some of them will be the vehicles that moved around you in frustration of you stopping on a green. You DON'T stop at a solid green.

 

If you are doubtful about entering an intersection because you feel you will be facing a changing light, reduce speed before you get to the corner as the "Don't Walk" is flashing to allow the light to go red before you get there. Now you will have a solid red waiting for you to stop at and not a "green means go" light.

 

If I was the examiner and the testee stopped at a steady green, I would fail them immeditaely for creating a hazardous situation and failing to properly manage intersection approach and arrival.

 

I must admit when I was 18 and took my driver's license (regular Class D) road test, this was the reason I failed...I stopped cause I saw the don't walk sign flashing. The instructor was like, what are you looking at? The traffic lights or the pedestrian lights? I felt so bad lol...but best believe on my second road test I passed.

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SimMan, I'll be honest and say: there's no easy way to "master" this skill. I've had my share of mistakes when in my 7-day training, and those lights can be tricky as you're not sure which ones are long or short.

 

This is where line training is helpful when you're able to know which lights you can make (assuming DOT hasn't modified them prior) from the ones you can't. There's a few lights I SAW start with the "Don't Walk" indication and, in a perfect world, and perfect timing, I would've made it; unfortunately this wasn't the case as the "Don't Walk" indictor flashed maybe 3-4 times as I was about 15-feet from the intersection, entered it, and noticed the light turning yellow then red after I passed through, which ALMOST cost me my Day 7 qualification, on Springfield Blvd..

 

Then, for example, the light at Nostrand Ave. and Avenue H is quite a long light, but I didn't know this as I saw it start from a while back, and prepared to slow down, then halt, and it still hadn't changed, yet; my line trainer told me to push through because it's a long light, so I accelerated through, and sure nuff, it turned yellow as I passed through the intersection.

 

You cannot judge every light, and I truly believe there's no certain "mastering" of this skill unless you're Jesus' brother and can read into the future. #justsayingthough lol

Edited by Acela Express
Grammar correction.

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Sorry to RESPECTFULLY disagree, but with experience as the years move on and as you said, knowing your intersections, you will see what I mean. Remember, a pedestrian see's you stop, they assume the light is red, they step out or run across and you have a fatality due to you sending the wrong signal.

 

Work at this skill and as time goes on you will master it. Trust me!

 

Re-read carefully what I said in these posts regarding the technique. I'll end with this:

 

Trying to memorize the # of flashes on the "Don't Walk" to figure out when the light will turn red is disaterous. Like you said, it might be 5 flashes until the light goes to red, but then they are adjusted and when your counting one, two while your on the pedal thinking you have time it the light suddenly turns to red. This is where both feet slam to the floor of the bus as you brace yourself! Please, do not rely on this method of counting flashes. Finally, the skill set to master is this:

 

Look at the condition of the "Don't Walk" indicator on the approaching corner as you leave the previous bus stop a block before. Knowing what it's doing a full block away will eliminate the counting and the uncertainty as to what to do, stop or go when you arrive. Your goal is to have a steady red waiting for you when you arrive not changing as you approach on the accelerator!

 

To ALL,:

Stay safe and practice this method. Let us know how it goes for those who apply this method. I'm certain you will feel more secure on your intersection decision making and it will be easy to master. Keep us informed!

 

All the best.

Edited by SimMan

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Keep that cdl clean boyz cuz thats the key to the fridge. I'm so happy I don't ever have to deal with a dmv instructor again in my life. I got the A and thats that. Also I retired from commercial driving. Good luck to all of you drivers.

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SimMan, I'll be honest and say: there's no easy way to "master" this skill. I've had my share of mistakes when in my 7-day training, and those lights can be tricky as you're not sure which ones are long or short.

 

This is where line training is helpful when you're able to know which lights you can make (assuming DOT hasn't modified them prior) from the ones you can't. There's a few lights I SAW start with the "Don't Walk" indication and, in a perfect world, and perfect timing, I would've made it; unfortunately this wasn't the case as the "Don't Walk" indictor flashed maybe 3-4 times as I was about 15-feet from the intersection, entered it, and noticed the light turning yellow then red after I passed through, which ALMOST cost me my Day 7 qualification, on Springfield Blvd..

 

Then, for example, the light at Nostrand Ave. and Avenue H is quite a long light, but I didn't know this as I saw it start from a while back, and prepared to slow down, then halt, and it still hadn't changed, yet; my line trainer told me to push through because it's a long light, so I accelerated through, and sure nuff, it turned yellow as I passed through the intersection.

 

You cannot judge every light, and I truly believe there's no certain "mastering" of this skill unless you're Jesus' brother and can read into the future. #justsayingthough lol

 

They key is you have to remember the which lights are long and short. Every route ive done ive remembered which lights are long and short.

 

You also have to keep in mind cars on your left on a two lane highway tend to creep on your left so if your running through a light they can go through with you and if you stop there is a danger of those cars stopping very fast causing an accident(unless you started to slow and stop for the light). If I feel a light is going to change i throw the engine brake on and start slowing early way before im near the intersection to let those cars know on the left that im stopping. You will get use to the lights AcelaExpress.

 

There is a skill to it because i believe you cannot just come up to an intersection not know what the hells going on with these lights lol idk about anyone else. Trust me if you ride my bus youll see what im talking about. I push through every light; if I cant stop then im going; you cant stop a bus on the dime unless your John Handcock.

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They key is you have to remember the which lights are long and short. Every route ive done ive remembered which lights are long and short.

 

You also have to keep in mind cars on your left on a two lane highway tend to creep on your left so if your running through a light they can go through with you and if you stop there is a danger of those cars stopping very fast causing an accident(unless you started to slow and stop for the light). If I feel a light is going to change i throw the engine brake on and start slowing early way before im near the intersection to let those cars know on the left that im stopping. You will get use to the lights AcelaExpress.

 

There is a skill to it because i believe you cannot just come up to an intersection not know what the hells going on with these lights lol idk about anyone else. Trust me if you ride my bus youll see what im talking about. I push through every light; if I cant stop then im going; you cant stop a bus on the dime unless your John Handcock.

 

Sounds like you now have an understanding of prepping "way before" the intersection arrives and what actions are to be taken when you have reached the "point of no return." Nice job!

 

Keep setting your eyes upon the "Don't Walk" indicator "early" and you won't have to be "late" with your reactions.

 

Stay safe!

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as you where taught in line training foward planning is the key if it blinks slow down and wait for the next light that way you are safe you need to know you guys are on probation for one year and you running a yellow or red can cause you your job or a six month extension so operate your bus in a safe matter at ALL TIMES and yes 9206 is a P.O.S.

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as you where taught in line training foward planning is the key if it blinks slow down and wait for the next light that way you are safe you need to know you guys are on probation for one year and you running a yellow or red can cause you your job or a six month extension so operate your bus in a safe matter at ALL TIMES and yes 9206 is a P.O.S.

 

I totally agree with you. It is like a double edge sword. The DMV instructor may punish you for it while a MTA Instructor may praise you for it. Since MTA is paying my bills i'm doing it MTA'S way. That is one bad habit I don't mind picking up. I could say that now cause I Passed my road test. So all in all, get your CDL so you don't have to deal with the hassle of a DMV instructor while taking your road test to work for MTA.

 

P.S I'm on a 7 hour swing that pays 12 hours. These senior guys got it good.

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I totally agree with you. It is like a double edge sword. The DMV instructor may punish you for it while a MTA Instructor may praise you for it. Since MTA is paying my bills i'm doing it MTA'S way. That is one bad habit I don't mind picking up. I could say that now cause I Passed my road test. So all in all, get your CDL so you don't have to deal with the hassle of a DMV instructor while taking your road test to work for MTA.

 

P.S I'm on a 7 hour swing that pays 12 hours. These senior guys got it good.

 

Haha I bet, I was talking with a B/O from Yukon that had one of those and he was talking about how great those express runs with swing time are.

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Sorry to RESPECTFULLY disagree, but with experience as the years move on and as you said, knowing your intersections, you will see what I mean. Remember, a pedestrian see's you stop, they assume the light is red, they step out or run across and you have a fatality due to you sending the wrong signal.

 

Work at this skill and as time goes on you will master it. Trust me!

 

Re-read carefully what I said in these posts regarding the technique. I'll end with this:

 

Trying to memorize the # of flashes on the "Don't Walk" to figure out when the light will turn red is disaterous. Like you said, it might be 5 flashes until the light goes to red, but then they are adjusted and when your counting one, two while your on the pedal thinking you have time it the light suddenly turns to red. This is where both feet slam to the floor of the bus as you brace yourself! Please, do not rely on this method of counting flashes. Finally, the skill set to master is this:

 

Look at the condition of the "Don't Walk" indicator on the approaching corner as you leave the previous bus stop a block before. Knowing what it's doing a full block away will eliminate the counting and the uncertainty as to what to do, stop or go when you arrive. Your goal is to have a steady red waiting for you when you arrive not changing as you approach on the accelerator!

 

To ALL,:

Stay safe and practice this method. Let us know how it goes for those who apply this method. I'm certain you will feel more secure on your intersection decision making and it will be easy to master. Keep us informed!

 

All the best.

Just had to come back to this topic; I've got the rhythm SimMan has been referring to in the quoted texts. At my depot, we handle 6 different lines, with myself being on 3 of them mostly (B41, 44 & 46), and you start to know your lights. For example: the light at Utica Ave & Avenue M - it works fine until the "Don't Walk" indicator displays, and on the first flash, the street signal goes from yellow, then red, before the pedestrian indicator stops it's flashing. After a few times on the B46, I caught out.

 

There's also another light on Utica Avenue at Maple Street, which flashes "Don't Walk" maybe about 4-5 times before it turns yellow, then red. It's tricky. After a while, depending on the bus you have, you can determine whether you'll make the light or not.

 

I'm still catching onto most of them as time goes along.

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Just had to come back to this topic; I've got the rhythm SimMan has been referring to in the quoted texts. At my depot, we handle 6 different lines, with myself being on 3 of them mostly (B41, 44 & 46), and you start to know your lights. For example: the light at Utica Ave & Avenue M - it works fine until the "Don't Walk" indicator displays, and on the first flash, the street signal goes from yellow, then red, before the pedestrian indicator stops it's flashing. After a few times on the B46, I caught out.

 

There's also another light on Utica Avenue at Maple Street, which flashes "Don't Walk" maybe about 4-5 times before it turns yellow, then red. It's tricky. After a while, depending on the bus you have, you can determine whether you'll make the light or not.

 

I'm still catching onto most of them as time goes along.

 

Same here, I've been doing the Bx19 as of late and I've gotten into the rhythm of dealing with the lights...it's def not easy lol

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