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68th Street Rehab (NIMBYism at its Finest)


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Guest lance25

...or at its most deplorable. You decide.

 

Courtesy DNAinfo

UPPER EAST SIDE — Residents from an elegant stretch of East 69th Street are outraged over MTA plans to add subway entrances for the overcrowded 68th Street station on their landmarked block.

 

They fear that the subway entrances on the Lexington Avenue line — expected to be built next year — would mar the character of their quiet, leafy street, bringing noise and possibly crime.

 

The MTA is planning to renovate the station at 68th Street/Hunter College as part of a federal requirement to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act, according to a presentation made at a Community Board 8 transportation committee meeting on Wednesday night.

 

An elevator would be added to the northeast corner of 68th Street and Lexington Avenue, and new entrances (just with stairs) would be built on the southwest and southeast corners of East 69th Street and Lexington Avenue.

 

“It would ruin the fabric of the neighborhood,” East 69th Street resident Nancy Friedman told DNAinfo. “It’s the most beautiful block in the city,” she claimed, describing her street’s carriage houses and townhouses.

 

Changes to historic districts were usually heavily scrutinized, Friedman added. “We’re not even allowed to change the windows — even on the back of our buildings, and they’re just going to slap this on the block?”

 

Particularly on the west side of the street, the entrance wasn't needed, she said, because "people to the west don't take the subway. Not to be elitist, but they don't."

 

The MTA’s plans spurred one man from the ritzy block to accuse the transit agency of using the ADA requirements as a “charade.”

 

Board members bristled at the accusation, with the committee’s co-chair calling the comment “offensive to disabled people.”

 

Community Board 8 will put the MTA’s presentation online and solicit responses to provide the MTA. The transportation authority is expected to come back in December with an updated plan.

 

In support of the MTA’s plans, CB 8 member A. Scott Falk — who said it has taken him up to five minutes to exit that subway when it’s crowded — told the residents at the meeting, “New York City is not a gated community. The whole idea of putting an entrance on 69th Street is going to open you up to marauding down the street seems a bit reactionary.”

 

But CB 8 member Teri Slater took umbrage at those remarks.

 

“This is not an elitist argument,” said Slater, who believes that there is simply more crime concentrated around subway entrances.

 

She didn’t think there was a “mandate” for the new entrances on East 69th Street and thought the MTA should redesign the plaza on East 68th Street in front of Hunter College to increase the size of the entrance instead.

 

“There’s a fundamental disconnect between the MTA and the neighborhoods of the Upper East Side,” she said.

 

That disconnect began to rear its head, she said, with the Second Avenue subway, which has turned swaths of the neighborhood into a giant construction zone.

 

So, a station with woefully inadequate entrances and exits should remain the way it is just so a few elitists can keep the "historic values" of the block? And to call the ADA mandate a "charade". I'm sure quite a few people have just two words for these jackasses: F*** YOU!

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Guest lance25

...or at its most deplorable. You decide.

 

Courtesy DNAinfo

UPPER EAST SIDE — Residents from an elegant stretch of East 69th Street are outraged over MTA plans to add subway entrances for the overcrowded 68th Street station on their landmarked block.

 

They fear that the subway entrances on the Lexington Avenue line — expected to be built next year — would mar the character of their quiet, leafy street, bringing noise and possibly crime.

 

The MTA is planning to renovate the station at 68th Street/Hunter College as part of a federal requirement to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act, according to a presentation made at a Community Board 8 transportation committee meeting on Wednesday night.

 

An elevator would be added to the northeast corner of 68th Street and Lexington Avenue, and new entrances (just with stairs) would be built on the southwest and southeast corners of East 69th Street and Lexington Avenue.

 

“It would ruin the fabric of the neighborhood,” East 69th Street resident Nancy Friedman told DNAinfo. “It’s the most beautiful block in the city,” she claimed, describing her street’s carriage houses and townhouses.

 

Changes to historic districts were usually heavily scrutinized, Friedman added. “We’re not even allowed to change the windows — even on the back of our buildings, and they’re just going to slap this on the block?”

 

Particularly on the west side of the street, the entrance wasn't needed, she said, because "people to the west don't take the subway. Not to be elitist, but they don't."

 

The MTA’s plans spurred one man from the ritzy block to accuse the transit agency of using the ADA requirements as a “charade.”

 

Board members bristled at the accusation, with the committee’s co-chair calling the comment “offensive to disabled people.”

 

Community Board 8 will put the MTA’s presentation online and solicit responses to provide the MTA. The transportation authority is expected to come back in December with an updated plan.

 

In support of the MTA’s plans, CB 8 member A. Scott Falk — who said it has taken him up to five minutes to exit that subway when it’s crowded — told the residents at the meeting, “New York City is not a gated community. The whole idea of putting an entrance on 69th Street is going to open you up to marauding down the street seems a bit reactionary.”

 

But CB 8 member Teri Slater took umbrage at those remarks.

 

“This is not an elitist argument,” said Slater, who believes that there is simply more crime concentrated around subway entrances.

 

She didn’t think there was a “mandate” for the new entrances on East 69th Street and thought the MTA should redesign the plaza on East 68th Street in front of Hunter College to increase the size of the entrance instead.

 

“There’s a fundamental disconnect between the MTA and the neighborhoods of the Upper East Side,” she said.

 

That disconnect began to rear its head, she said, with the Second Avenue subway, which has turned swaths of the neighborhood into a giant construction zone.

 

 

So, a station with woefully inadequate entrances and exits should remain the way it is just so a few elitists can keep the "historic values" of the block? And to call the ADA mandate a "charade". I'm sure quite a few people have just two words for these jackasses: F*** YOU!

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Just put the entrance somewhere else then. There was a lawsuit over entrances for the proposed Second Avenue Subway on 86th Street because one building didn't want them on both sides of it but you don't hear about that.

 

I don't agree with what they say about ADA and being a charade, but if they're willing to put up a fight then it's not worth it, and the MTA should just build the entrance elsewhere.

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Just put the entrance somewhere else then. There was a lawsuit over entrances for the proposed Second Avenue Subway on 86th Street because one building didn't want them on both sides of it but you don't hear about that.

 

I don't agree with what they say about ADA and being a charade, but if they're willing to put up a fight then it's not worth it, and the MTA should just build the entrance elsewhere.

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Tie all the elitists and hood rats together and light them all on fire, and watch them burn.

 

The world will be rid of many of its problems.

 

Snobs are worthless, useless people, and no one will miss them when they are gone. 69th street doesn't have character any differently than any other block on the upper east side. maybe they should play hardball with the neighborhood and threaten to close the 68th street station if there's "so much crime" near subway stations...then they can wait patiently for the second avenue subway station on 72nd and 2nd - which BTW this same community board whined about, costing millions in design fees to re-plan the SAS entrances to fit in with the yuppie broomstick crowd's idea of an urban aesthetic.

 

community boards are useless vehicles for whining and complaining by pathetic people who have nothing better to do with their time. people with lives don't join them.

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Tie all the elitists and hood rats together and light them all on fire, and watch them burn.

 

The world will be rid of many of its problems.

 

Snobs are worthless, useless people, and no one will miss them when they are gone. 69th street doesn't have character any differently than any other block on the upper east side. maybe they should play hardball with the neighborhood and threaten to close the 68th street station if there's "so much crime" near subway stations...then they can wait patiently for the second avenue subway station on 72nd and 2nd - which BTW this same community board whined about, costing millions in design fees to re-plan the SAS entrances to fit in with the yuppie broomstick crowd's idea of an urban aesthetic.

 

community boards are useless vehicles for whining and complaining by pathetic people who have nothing better to do with their time. people with lives don't join them.

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Hey it's their neighborhood and who is the (MTA) to just march in and throw entrances where ever? You call it elitist all you want, but I sure as hell would fight to keep the character and safeness of my neighborhood if I felt that building certain things would cause more crime and such to come into the neighborhood. Crime is certainly on the rise in the city and women are being assaulted mainly coming from the subways esp. of late, so they have a legitimate gripe.

 

I doubt any of these board members on the (MTA) live on the Upper East Side, so what do they care about the situation? Typical and disturbing. And for all you who are in favor of this let the (MTA) come to your neighborhood and ram entrances all about. It's always OK when it isn't your neighborhood right? Friggin' hypocrites.

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Hey it's their neighborhood and who is the (MTA) to just march in and throw entrances where ever? You call it elitist all you want, but I sure as hell would fight to keep the character and safeness of my neighborhood if I felt that building certain things would cause more crime and such to come into the neighborhood. Crime is certainly on the rise in the city and women are being assaulted mainly coming from the subways esp. of late, so they have a legitimate gripe.

 

I doubt any of these board members on the (MTA) live on the Upper East Side, so what do they care about the situation? Typical and disturbing. And for all you who are in favor of this let the (MTA) come to your neighborhood and ram entrances all about. It's always OK when it isn't your neighborhood right? Friggin' hypocrites.

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Its the whole 99% vs 1% thing again. The 99% needs another entrance for the large population of customers exiting from the far half of the train (both directions), an expanded entrance mezzanine wouldn't solve the problem with passenger egress. The 1% doesn't want the 99% roaming their block or neighborhood except within the confines of Hunter College, which is right next to the existing entrance. Their point is that station rehabs did not have to be made ADA compliant with elevators otherwise all the rehabbed stations in the Bronx would have elevators. They did not add not one elevator with all the completed Bronx rehabs (except E180, which isn't done yet), and was cheap to do since the station itself is flat, open cut (only one set of elevators needed).

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Its the whole 99% vs 1% thing again. The 99% needs another entrance for the large population of customers exiting from the far half of the train (both directions), an expanded entrance mezzanine wouldn't solve the problem with passenger egress. The 1% doesn't want the 99% roaming their block or neighborhood except within the confines of Hunter College, which is right next to the existing entrance. Their point is that station rehabs did not have to be made ADA compliant with elevators otherwise all the rehabbed stations in the Bronx would have elevators. They did not add not one elevator with all the completed Bronx rehabs (except E180, which isn't done yet), and was cheap to do since the station itself is flat, open cut (only one set of elevators needed).

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Hey it's their neighborhood and who is the (MTA) to just march in and throw entrances where ever? You call it elitist all you want, but I sure as hell would fight to keep the character and safeness of my neighborhood if I felt that building certain things would cause more crime and such to come into the neighborhood. Crime is certainly on the rise in the city and women are being assaulted mainly coming from the subways esp. of late, so they have a legitimate gripe.

 

I doubt any of these board members on the (MTA) live on the Upper East Side, so what do they care about the situation? Typical and disturbing. And for all you who are in favor of this let the (MTA) come to your neighborhood and ram entrances all about. It's always OK when it isn't your neighborhood right? Friggin' hypocrites.

 

Exactly what I'm thinking. If this issue was over a proposed station somewhere in the Bronx and residents were protesting and saying how crime rate around there would increase then everyone would agree that it should be moved elsewhere, but here because it's on the Upper East Side almost everyone on this forum is quick to say "F*** those elitist bastards."

 

Near the 77th and 86th Street subway station on Lexington Avenue there can be a few bums that hang around the entrances, and it just in general isn't that pleasant, but mainly only right by the entrances, so the residents of 69th Street have a very valid argument. I'm not really buying the whole historical aspect, but it definitely would increase crime rate and bum rate, even by a little.

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Hey it's their neighborhood and who is the (MTA) to just march in and throw entrances where ever? You call it elitist all you want, but I sure as hell would fight to keep the character and safeness of my neighborhood if I felt that building certain things would cause more crime and such to come into the neighborhood. Crime is certainly on the rise in the city and women are being assaulted mainly coming from the subways esp. of late, so they have a legitimate gripe.

 

I doubt any of these board members on the (MTA) live on the Upper East Side, so what do they care about the situation? Typical and disturbing. And for all you who are in favor of this let the (MTA) come to your neighborhood and ram entrances all about. It's always OK when it isn't your neighborhood right? Friggin' hypocrites.

 

Exactly what I'm thinking. If this issue was over a proposed station somewhere in the Bronx and residents were protesting and saying how crime rate around there would increase then everyone would agree that it should be moved elsewhere, but here because it's on the Upper East Side almost everyone on this forum is quick to say "F*** those elitist bastards."

 

Near the 77th and 86th Street subway station on Lexington Avenue there can be a few bums that hang around the entrances, and it just in general isn't that pleasant, but mainly only right by the entrances, so the residents of 69th Street have a very valid argument. I'm not really buying the whole historical aspect, but it definitely would increase crime rate and bum rate, even by a little.

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...or at its most deplorable. You decide.

 

Courtesy DNAinfo

 

 

So, a station with woefully inadequate entrances and exits should remain the way it is just so a few elitists can keep the "historic values" of the block? And to call the ADA mandate a "charade". I'm sure quite a few people have just two words for these jackasses: F*** YOU!

 

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...or at its most deplorable. You decide.

 

Courtesy DNAinfo

 

 

So, a station with woefully inadequate entrances and exits should remain the way it is just so a few elitists can keep the "historic values" of the block? And to call the ADA mandate a "charade". I'm sure quite a few people have just two words for these jackasses: F*** YOU!

 

Deleted Post.

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I actually agree with the rich snobs here (sorry SubwayGuy). If these people don't want another subway entrance in their neighborhood, then don't give it to them. There's less affluent and more appreciative neighborhoods out there who wouldn't mind another entrance at their busy stations.

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I actually agree with the rich snobs here (sorry SubwayGuy). If these people don't want another subway entrance in their neighborhood, then don't give it to them. There's less affluent and more appreciative neighborhoods out there who wouldn't mind another entrance at their busy stations.

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Exactly what I'm thinking. If this issue was over a proposed station somewhere in the Bronx and residents were protesting and saying how crime rate around there would increase then everyone would agree that it should be moved elsewhere, but here because it's on the Upper East Side almost everyone on this forum is quick to say "F*** those elitist bastards."

 

Near the 77th and 86th Street subway station on Lexington Avenue there can be a few bums that hang around the entrances, and it just in general isn't that pleasant, but mainly only right by the entrances, so the residents of 69th Street have a very valid argument. I'm not really buying the whole historical aspect, but it definitely would increase crime rate and bum rate, even by a little.

 

 

What sickens me is how quickly these folks are to defend the (MTA) aka BULLIES at all costs. They love to come in and throw their agenda around and tell communities what they need in their own friggin' neighborhoods when they don't anything about the areas. It really sickens me. I hope those folks win. It's about time that somebody stands up to the (MTA) because they are used to having it "their" way all of the time. They've done enough to destroy the character of the Upper East Side already and they just won't leave well alone. :mad:

 

Its the whole 99% vs 1% thing again. The 99% needs another entrance for the large population of customers exiting from the far half of the train (both directions), an expanded entrance mezzanine wouldn't solve the problem with passenger egress. The 1% doesn't want the 99% roaming their block or neighborhood except within the confines of Hunter College, which is right next to the existing entrance. Their point is that station rehabs did not have to be made ADA compliant with elevators otherwise all the rehabbed stations in the Bronx would have elevators. They did not add not one elevator with all the completed Bronx rehabs (except E180, which isn't done yet), and was cheap to do since the station itself is flat, open cut (only one set of elevators needed).

 

Okay, so they need an additional entrance, fine. Why can't the (MTA) be civil and try to work with the community for once instead of doing what they want? This is supposed to be agency working for the public, and rarely do I see them trying to work with the communities where they cause unrest. They look to sugarcoat the situation as if they're cooperating when in reality they're just doing what they want to do because to them the communities don't matter, just their agenda that matters. And this episode with the Upper East Side is just one of many where they've marched in and have caused nothing but havoc and then claim innocence until the very end and then suddenly they want to help. :mad:

 

 

Oh and where are all of the folks at that said that the (MTA) doesn't need to add ADA accessible entrances? Now suddenly there is such a need for ADA entrances, when they re-did just about all of the stations on the Brighton Beach Line and added very few if any ADA entrances? Again, quite hypocritical.

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Exactly what I'm thinking. If this issue was over a proposed station somewhere in the Bronx and residents were protesting and saying how crime rate around there would increase then everyone would agree that it should be moved elsewhere, but here because it's on the Upper East Side almost everyone on this forum is quick to say "F*** those elitist bastards."

 

Near the 77th and 86th Street subway station on Lexington Avenue there can be a few bums that hang around the entrances, and it just in general isn't that pleasant, but mainly only right by the entrances, so the residents of 69th Street have a very valid argument. I'm not really buying the whole historical aspect, but it definitely would increase crime rate and bum rate, even by a little.

 

 

What sickens me is how quickly these folks are to defend the (MTA) aka BULLIES at all costs. They love to come in and throw their agenda around and tell communities what they need in their own friggin' neighborhoods when they don't anything about the areas. It really sickens me. I hope those folks win. It's about time that somebody stands up to the (MTA) because they are used to having it "their" way all of the time. They've done enough to destroy the character of the Upper East Side already and they just won't leave well alone. :mad:

 

Its the whole 99% vs 1% thing again. The 99% needs another entrance for the large population of customers exiting from the far half of the train (both directions), an expanded entrance mezzanine wouldn't solve the problem with passenger egress. The 1% doesn't want the 99% roaming their block or neighborhood except within the confines of Hunter College, which is right next to the existing entrance. Their point is that station rehabs did not have to be made ADA compliant with elevators otherwise all the rehabbed stations in the Bronx would have elevators. They did not add not one elevator with all the completed Bronx rehabs (except E180, which isn't done yet), and was cheap to do since the station itself is flat, open cut (only one set of elevators needed).

 

Okay, so they need an additional entrance, fine. Why can't the (MTA) be civil and try to work with the community for once instead of doing what they want? This is supposed to be agency working for the public, and rarely do I see them trying to work with the communities where they cause unrest. They look to sugarcoat the situation as if they're cooperating when in reality they're just doing what they want to do because to them the communities don't matter, just their agenda that matters. And this episode with the Upper East Side is just one of many where they've marched in and have caused nothing but havoc and then claim innocence until the very end and then suddenly they want to help. :mad:

 

 

Oh and where are all of the folks at that said that the (MTA) doesn't need to add ADA accessible entrances? Now suddenly there is such a need for ADA entrances, when they re-did just about all of the stations on the Brighton Beach Line and added very few if any ADA entrances? Again, quite hypocritical.

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Exactly what I'm thinking. If this issue was over a proposed station somewhere in the Bronx and residents were protesting and saying how crime rate around there would increase then everyone would agree that it should be moved elsewhere, but here because it's on the Upper East Side almost everyone on this forum is quick to say "F*** those elitist bastards."

 

Near the 77th and 86th Street subway station on Lexington Avenue there can be a few bums that hang around the entrances, and it just in general isn't that pleasant, but mainly only right by the entrances, so the residents of 69th Street have a very valid argument. I'm not really buying the whole historical aspect, but it definitely would increase crime rate and bum rate, even by a little.

 

77th, 86th, and 96th streets are three of the safest stations around

 

All these people want is to complain to block something they don't "like". There is no law against people being homeless or smelling bad on public sidewalk. If these people are worried that's going to bring "crime" then they really are retarded because it hasn't brought any at 77th or 86th.

 

Not to mention all THREE of those stations score very low on homeless population in general - the homeless all sleep in the stations north of 103rd, the Nostrand Ave. line to Flatbush, Grand Army Plaza...they don't sleep in the upper east side stations because when they do they get caught and kicked out. The stations are well monitored and if it does bring in an influx of homeless people they'll be out immediately.

 

The station is highly overcrowded and the one entrance is not sufficient for good passenger flow. However unlike 77th and 86th Streets, which have similar problems, the platform is actually wide enough to do something about it.

 

These NIMBYs don't want to "work with" the MTA to solve the problem and find something that makes everyone happy...because they will never be happy...they just don't want their perceived property values to go down. 1% thinking at its finest. Throw 10 grand at each of them to shut their pie holes and I'd bet you they will (I'm not advocating this - I'm just using it to show where their priorities are).

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Exactly what I'm thinking. If this issue was over a proposed station somewhere in the Bronx and residents were protesting and saying how crime rate around there would increase then everyone would agree that it should be moved elsewhere, but here because it's on the Upper East Side almost everyone on this forum is quick to say "F*** those elitist bastards."

 

Near the 77th and 86th Street subway station on Lexington Avenue there can be a few bums that hang around the entrances, and it just in general isn't that pleasant, but mainly only right by the entrances, so the residents of 69th Street have a very valid argument. I'm not really buying the whole historical aspect, but it definitely would increase crime rate and bum rate, even by a little.

 

77th, 86th, and 96th streets are three of the safest stations around

 

All these people want is to complain to block something they don't "like". There is no law against people being homeless or smelling bad on public sidewalk. If these people are worried that's going to bring "crime" then they really are retarded because it hasn't brought any at 77th or 86th.

 

Not to mention all THREE of those stations score very low on homeless population in general - the homeless all sleep in the stations north of 103rd, the Nostrand Ave. line to Flatbush, Grand Army Plaza...they don't sleep in the upper east side stations because when they do they get caught and kicked out. The stations are well monitored and if it does bring in an influx of homeless people they'll be out immediately.

 

The station is highly overcrowded and the one entrance is not sufficient for good passenger flow. However unlike 77th and 86th Streets, which have similar problems, the platform is actually wide enough to do something about it.

 

These NIMBYs don't want to "work with" the MTA to solve the problem and find something that makes everyone happy...because they will never be happy...they just don't want their perceived property values to go down. 1% thinking at its finest. Throw 10 grand at each of them to shut their pie holes and I'd bet you they will (I'm not advocating this - I'm just using it to show where their priorities are).

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Oh and where are all of the folks at that said that the (MTA) doesn't need to add ADA accessible entrances? Now suddenly there is such a need for ADA entrances, when they re-did just about all of the stations on the Brighton Beach Line and added very few if any ADA entrances? Again, quite hypocritical.

 

All new work must be made ADA accessible, that's how the law works. There's a difference between restoring a station platform or an old entrance, and building a brand new one. A brand new station entrance/exit would have to be ADA accessible by law.

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Oh and where are all of the folks at that said that the (MTA) doesn't need to add ADA accessible entrances? Now suddenly there is such a need for ADA entrances, when they re-did just about all of the stations on the Brighton Beach Line and added very few if any ADA entrances? Again, quite hypocritical.

 

All new work must be made ADA accessible, that's how the law works. There's a difference between restoring a station platform or an old entrance, and building a brand new one. A brand new station entrance/exit would have to be ADA accessible by law.

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77th, 86th, and 96th streets are three of the safest stations around

 

All these people want is to complain to block something they don't "like". There is no law against people being homeless or smelling bad on public sidewalk. If these people are worried that's going to bring "crime" then they really are retarded because it hasn't brought any at 77th or 86th.

 

Not to mention all THREE of those stations score very low on homeless population in general - the homeless all sleep in the stations north of 103rd, the Nostrand Ave. line to Flatbush, Grand Army Plaza...they don't sleep in the upper east side stations because when they do they get caught and kicked out. The stations are well monitored and if it does bring in an influx of homeless people they'll be out immediately.

 

The station is highly overcrowded and the one entrance is not sufficient for good passenger flow. However unlike 77th and 86th Streets, which have similar problems, the platform is actually wide enough to do something about it.

 

These NIMBYs don't want to "work with" the MTA to solve the problem and find something that makes everyone happy...because they will never be happy...they just don't want their perceived property values to go down. 1% thinking at its finest. Throw 10 grand at each of them to shut their pie holes and I'd bet you they will (I'm not advocating this - I'm just using it to show where their priorities are).

 

Yeah, SURE they don't. That's why I see a bunch of homeless folks right on 5th Avenue sleeping and hanging out. I must be seeing things... You are so in denial and in defense of this bully agency to promote your "elitist" theory that it's ridiculous. If you could stop thinking about class for once and just about a community then perhaps you could better understand their fight.

 

All new work must be made ADA accessible, that's how the law works. There's a difference between restoring a station platform or an old entrance, and building a brand new one. A brand new station entrance/exit would have to be ADA accessible by law.

 

 

Well that's news to me. I mean they basically just about took down the entire structures along the Brighton Line with some stations and yet they couldn't make those stations ADA accessible? A load of BS. Okay, fine so it's the law, but still. They don't have to put it there at 69th street. They can look for the other places, but clearly they want to cause a problem. I guess you forgot about that little rapist/sexual predator that was attacking woman on the Upper East Side for weeks and running back to the subway for his escape... Yeah, but they're just elitists... Yeah right. :)

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