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Report: MTA elevated-line workers slack on the job, costs city $10 million


Harry

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Some track maintenance crews regularly work on the rails just four hours a day - but get paid for a full eight hours, a report released Monday reveals.

 

Hundreds of track workers assigned to the elevated lines spend large parts of their weekday shifts reading, chatting or doing other leisure-time pursuits instead of fixing rails and switches, a report by MTA Inspector General Barry Kluger's office says.

 

A handful of elevated-line workers even left NYC Transit property to lounge in a park, shop or even tend to a side business, Kluger said in an interview.

 

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2009/12/02/2009-12-02_report_mta_crews_slackin_on_tracks.html#ixzz0YXWEUBQR

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I am not surprised...this is why most projects are often delayed: the workers are often dilly-dallying doing nonsense instead of doing what they are supposed to be doing: improving transit.

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I am not surprised...this is why most projects are often delayed: the workers are often dilly-dallying doing nonsense instead of doing what they are supposed to be doing: improving transit.

 

Dont confuse "contractors" with actual track workers...

 

Not to mention this story surfaced a few years back as well...

 

The timing is Interesting....

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What else do we expect from today's society?

 

Anyways, i agree with LRG, i just hope that the Beach 67 St station isn't delayed past what the expected date listed to reopen the Far Rock bound platform.

 

I see a bunch of workers smoking, chatting, ect. while fixing the platform.

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What else do we expect from today's society?

 

Anyways, i agree with LRG, i just hope that the Beach 67 St station isn't delayed past what the expected date listed to reopen the Far Rock bound platform.

 

I see a bunch of workers smoking, chatting, ect. while fixing the platform.

 

Again dont confuse Track Workers with Contractors...

 

People cant seem to grasp this...

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what is not told is the forced down time these workers get. first of all they can not get on the tracks untill the rush hour is over and all train delays are cleared up then RCC might give them the tracks. by the time that happens its 12pm and they have to be done and cleared off by 2:30-3pm so they dont interupt the evening rush. so they may start their day at 7am but its not their fault the work does not get done on time. they show up on time ready to work everyday.

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I know they are contractors, but we look at them all the same.

 

Then thats not right on yours and anybody else part.:)

 

what is not told is the forced down time these workers get. first of all they can not get on the tracks untill the rush hour is over and all train delays are cleared up then RCC might give them the tracks. by the time that happens its 12pm and they have to be done and cleared off by 2:30-3pm so they dont interupt the evening rush. so they may start their day at 7am but its not their fault the work does not get done on time. they show up on time ready to work everyday.

 

Thsi is and "old" story and for some reason its being brought up again care to guess why?

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Then thats not right on yours and anybody else part.:(

 

You know as wrong as this might seem, its the typical civilian response. Most don't notice the difference between a contractor or a regular employee...they just see some guy who's supposed to be working but isn't. When I do temp work/contract work...doesn't matter my position. I'm there to do a job and i represent not only the client but the company who sent me. When the customer is around, if they see me slacking when I'm suppose to be working...whether I'm a contractor or a regular employee of the company would make no difference. They see a person on staff who is not doing their job.

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You know as wrong as this might seem, its the typical civilian response. Most don't notice the difference between a contractor or a regular employee...they just see some guy who's supposed to be working but isn't. When I do temp work/contract work...doesn't matter my position. I'm there to do a job and i represent not only the client but the company who sent me. When the customer is around, if they see me slacking when I'm suppose to be working...whether I'm a contractor or a regular employee of the company would make no difference. They see a person on staff who is not doing their job.

 

Nobody says i have to like it right?

 

Im very much aware on how peoples narrow views when it comes to "In House Workers" and Contractors down here seen enough of it in 8 years..

 

Thats my point thats all.

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what is not told is the forced down time these workers get. first of all they can not get on the tracks untill the rush hour is over and all train delays are cleared up then RCC might give them the tracks. by the time that happens its 12pm and they have to be done and cleared off by 2:30-3pm so they dont interupt the evening rush. so they may start their day at 7am but its not their fault the work does not get done on time. they show up on time ready to work everyday.

 

What's the matter with you, ruining a good story with pesky facts...

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what is not told is the forced down time these workers get. first of all they can not get on the tracks untill the rush hour is over and all train delays are cleared up then RCC might give them the tracks. by the time that happens its 12pm and they have to be done and cleared off by 2:30-3pm so they dont interupt the evening rush. so they may start their day at 7am but its not their fault the work does not get done on time. they show up on time ready to work everyday.

 

From the article:

 

"Part of the problem is scheduling. NYC Transit generally performs weekday maintenance on elevated lines between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m., partly because it would be unsafe to toil in the dark, according to the report. The agency also wants to avoid causing additional delays during rush hours."

 

It's also been repeated on the news over and over again. Personally I don't care how long they work as long as they keep service running and on time. Due to the nature of the job it's just going to happen.

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If people feel that this is BS and the workers should put in a full 8 hours working, then have them work at night. I know working on elevates structures at night is against the rules, but if people feel that worker safety is not important, then have them work at night. make it safe for the worker, put up bank lights in the whole work area or maybe those light trailers they use on the highways at night. I'm sure the people who live next to el structures would love that, train horns and pnumatic tools working all night.

Really though, this is an old story and it's BS. The rules state that workers can only be on the tracks from 9AM to 4PM and as pointed out before, thats only if RCC gives them the go head. For underground work, workers can be out on the road bed as early as 9PM until about 4 or 5 PM (please correct me if I am wrong) but they can't work out side at night unless it is an emergency. So this all ready gives workers a limited time to work out side. Then doring the hours they can work out side, that time can be enev further limited due to the weather for safety reasons.

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90% of the problem is NYCT own rules. Where I work in Queens you can't be on the track till after 9am and have to be off by 3pm. Believe me they (nyct) do not want us on the tracks at all. They don't want any delays and the less people working on the tracks the better. Unfortunately for them the tracks have to be maintained, so they give us a small window of time to get our daily jobs done. All this ruckus is for public perception. Like I said if it were up to NYCT they would have us do the least amount of work possible to maintain the tracks safely. But NYCT is taking a lot of heat from politicians and the public to have us work more hours so they have to make it seem they're "shocked and outraged" that Track crews are only on the tracks a few hours a day. They've known this for years!!! It's their rules!!! Public perception people. Now let me tell you what's gonna happen. A track workers job is an inherently dangerous one. There's many ways to die on this job and some of us do. I've been on the job for 16yrs and knew 4 people who have died on the job. We don't want to be on the tracks any longer than we have to. To keep us on the tracks longer for "Public perception" is ridiculous and dangerous. Not only that but NYCT is trying to give all Track workers midweek days off. As it is now most trackmen in Maintenence get only one weekend day off a week. Track construction gets no weekends off. If they keep pushing for longer hours on the track and no week ends off for anybody, your going to see some MASSIVE rule book slow downs. If I'm gonna be on the track all day and have no weekends off to spend time with my family, well than all the rules must be followed. Every train will be delayed.On time service will be out the window. Soon Mr. Samuelsen will take over as President of the TWU. Mr Samuelsen is a Track Worker who was never afraid to take appropriate action when warranted. NYCT should be careful what they wish for. They just might get it.

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If people feel that this is BS and the workers should put in a full 8 hours working, then have them work at night. I know working on elevates structures at night is against the rules, but if people feel that worker safety is not important, then have them work at night. make it safe for the worker, put up bank lights in the whole work area or maybe those light trailers they use on the highways at night. I'm sure the people who live next to el structures would love that, train horns and pnumatic tools working all night.

Really though, this is an old story and it's BS. The rules state that workers can only be on the tracks from 9AM to 4PM and as pointed out before, thats only if RCC gives them the go head. For underground work, workers can be out on the road bed as early as 9PM until about 4 or 5 PM (please correct me if I am wrong) but they can't work out side at night unless it is an emergency. So this all ready gives workers a limited time to work out side. Then doring the hours they can work out side, that time can be enev further limited due to the weather for safety reasons.

 

The times that they say are ok to work during the day is 9am to 3pm. For nights it's 10pm to 5am. Some lines differ,but for the most part that's right.

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The times that they say are ok to work during the day is 9am to 3pm. For nights it's 10pm to 5am. Some lines differ,but for the most part that's right.

 

Ah ok thanks for that, I did not feel like checking my flagging rule book and I thought I would get it close enough. One line that I have noticed where they work later into the day is the (7) line, I have seen signal dept. and track dept. out as late as 4:45.

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A track workers job is an inherently dangerous one. There's many ways to die on this job and some of us do. I've been on the job for 16yrs and knew 4 people who have died on the job.

I assume these deaths stem from train accidents. Is this a problem on tracks that are not in use and physically separated from other tracks? (e.g., the southbound local track from Newkirk Avenue to Sheepshead Bay on the Brighton line)

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This is old news. I see people slacking off all the time. The Neck Road and Avenue U stations could have been completed a couple months ago.

Again, that is work being done by contractors. Aside from CPM, the only TA workers that are usually at those job site are RTO flagging personnel.

 

90% of the problem is NYCT own rules. Where I work in Queens you can't be on the track till after 9am and have to be off by 3pm. Believe me they (nyct) do not want us on the tracks at all. They don't want any delays and the less people working on the tracks the better. Unfortunately for them the tracks have to be maintained, so they give us a small window of time to get our daily jobs done. All this ruckus is for public perception. Like I said if it were up to NYCT they would have us do the least amount of work possible to maintain the tracks safely.

 

Funny you should say how the TA does not want work crews on the track, several line managers have said that they do not want anyone flagging along their line. One story that I was told, track dept. wanted to inspect a section of track on a particular line. The line manager said no, no one sets up flagging on my line. Track said were not sending guys down without flagging so the line manager said too bad. The response form track was to say that the tracks were unsafe which then forced the manager to allow workers out that night.

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I assume these deaths stem from train accidents. Is this a problem on tracks that are not in use and physically separated from other tracks? (e.g., the southbound local track from Newkirk Avenue to Sheepshead Bay on the Brighton line)

 

One slipped and fell on an exposed third rail and was electrocuted. The other three were hit by trains. Not sure of the exact circumstances and locations of the four incidents as I was not on any of the job sites(thankfully). All four deaths occurred in the hole(tunnel).

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