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Harry

MTA has done a heroic job responding to Sandy, but there is work to be done

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[float=left]post-5097-0-36313700-1352207959_thumb.jpg[/float]The (MTA) has done a phenomenal job bringing the subway system roaring back since Hurricane Sandy’s massive beatdown on the city.

 

But as soon as the last drop of New York Harbor is pumped from the tunnels, the authority must start drawing a blueprint to keep the next killer storm from knocking out our system.

Over the last several years, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority has spent tens of millions of dollars elevating sidewalk ventilation grates and building other defenses against monster storms.

 

Read more: Source

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Guest Lance

Now let's see if this amounts to more than just idle conversation.

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I would think this will get the attention it deserves now. And I'm not talking about because of this article but inside the MTA they have to already be discussing this.

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I agree, the (MTA) has done a great job and had a great response to the storm!

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Its all about funding...

 

 

Whatever it's about, they need to be, and probably are already discussing this.

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[float=left]post-5097-0-21673700-1352255141_thumb.jpg[/float]It is not too often that I compliment the MTA for a job well done. Regular readers of this column know most of my commentary toward the MTA usually is negative, but not this time. First, they did a tremendous job protecting the equipment from flooding by moving subways and buses to higher ground before the storm, as well as other protective measures to prevent damage to rolling stock and equipment. Then they worked ‘round the clock to remove standing water, clear debris, and check every foot of the system to ensure it was safe for service to return. That certainly was a monumental task.

 

Read more: Source

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Among the things I would be looking at if it were me is the things that have been done in recent years, including the replacement of South Ferry, re-doing the Canal and Bowery Stations on the (J) and other things. Some of these I feel may need to be reversed to provide greater flexibility, including:

 

Getting the old South Ferry (1) station back to full functionality as quickly as possible so for now it can be used in on an emergency basis (since the current (1) station may be out of commission for some time) while long-term installing an elevator there and a stairway and elevator on the short platform at Bowling Green to allow for a revival of the Bowling Green-South Ferry shuttle on weekdays while the (5) when not going to Brooklyn would terminate there and the (6), extended from Brooklyn Bridge would do the same in the overnights. This is something I would have done in the first place as far as the Lexington line, and I think it's something that could be pushed for in light of Sandy and this nor'easter coming almost right behind it, as especially in bad weather it would give people coming from Staten Island being able to gtet the Lexington line with being outside at a minimum at worst and not at all at best.

 

Getting the abandoned northbound platforms at Canal Street and Bowery on the (J) back into operation and putting northbound trains back there, while having the "express" tracks at those stations go back to their old purposes. This would allow in an emergency for the (J) to be able to use Canal Street as a terminal in an emergency is something like Sandy ever hits again and following a storm trains can turn there, but not go to Chambers or Broad.

 

These are just two of the things I think need to be looked at post-Sandy with the emphasis of providing greater flexibility wherever possible..

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Among the things I would be looking at if it were me is the things that have been done in recent years, including the replacement of South Ferry, re-doing the Canal and Bowery Stations on the (J) and other things. Some of these I feel may need to be reversed to provide greater flexibility, including:

 

Getting the old South Ferry (1) station back to full functionality as quickly as possible so for now it can be used in on an emergency basis (since the current (1) station may be out of commission for some time) while long-term installing an elevator there and a stairway and elevator on the short platform at Bowling Green to allow for a revival of the Bowling Green-South Ferry shuttle on weekdays while the (5) when not going to Brooklyn would terminate there and the (6), extended from Brooklyn Bridge would do the same in the overnights. This is something I would have done in the first place as far as the Lexington line, and I think it's something that could be pushed for in light of Sandy and this nor'easter coming almost right behind it, as especially in bad weather it would give people coming from Staten Island being able to gtet the Lexington line with being outside at a minimum at worst and not at all at best.

 

 

 

Although i'm with you on rebuilding the south ferry loop for revenue service and may even be used for regular service if they want to increase train capacity along the 1 in the future. But the Shuttle to bowling green would just be a complete waste of money. What good would it be for? Need lexington service?-take the (2) to fulton , need 7 ave?-take the (4)(5) to Fulton. Need Lex services whiles't getting off the ferry? walk a block further to bowling green. Need 7 ave service whiles't getting off the ferry? (assuming the loop is not open for revenue service) walk to bowling green and take the (4) or (5) to Fulton.

 

Plus the shuttle would cost millions of dollars to rehabilitate and to bring to operational cost and for what? a week or two of service? Not worth it, i'd rather them build some actual useful transfers (assuming the MTA somehow has money) like the Junius street (3)(4) - Livonia ave (L) transfer to ease congestion at b'way junction.

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i'd rather them build some actual useful transfers (assuming the MTA somehow has money) like the Junius street (3)(4) - Livonia ave (L) transfer to ease congestion at b'way junction.

 

That transfer is definitely needed, and should have been done a long time ago (I used to pass by that area daily years ago and wondered why that never was done).

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That transfer is definitely needed, and should have been done a long time ago (I used to pass by that area daily years ago and wondered why that never was done).

 

 

I believe it is planned in a few years.

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