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R68 Subway Car

LIRR EL Photos at Atlantic and Utica (2009.02.26)

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Those are awesome man!

 

Of the few photos from this spot where you was standing, this photo was the best and my favorite in the batch.

M7_7699_AtlanticUtica_2_26_09.jpg

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Perfect "entire train" shots! They should've replaced the tracks with concrete ties as well as adding a railings and a yellow workers' path on the sides like the subway viaducts. Every time a train goes by, I'm always afraid that it'll derail and fall off the viaduct. If the wooden ties are replaced with concrete ties, I'm sure that the trains can go up to 110 mph.

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If the wooden ties are replaced with concrete ties, I'm sure that the trains can go up to 110 mph.

 

Let's just say if I was going 110mph on the Atlantic Ave. viaduct, my pants would be filled with a brown stinky substance.

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Let's just say if I was going 110mph on the Atlantic Ave. viaduct, my pants would be filled with a brown stinky substance.

ewwwww

 

anyway, nice subway photos R68 Subway Car... hey, it fits!

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Nice, clear and crisp pix... What is with those short sets on the LIRR Atlantic Branch?

 

Generally speaking, the (relatively) lesser used branch lines (Hempstead, Far Rockaway, etc.) are routed to Flatbush Ave., particularly during the off-peak period, while the Babylon and Ronkonkoma "main" lines tend to go to Penn. Those branches tend to have shorter trainsets, so you're more likely to see them on the Atlantic Branch. In fact, at most only 10 cars can platform at FBA.

Perfect "entire train" shots! They should've replaced the tracks with concrete ties as well as adding a railings and a yellow workers' path on the sides like the subway viaducts. Every time a train goes by, I'm always afraid that it'll derail and fall off the viaduct. If the wooden ties are replaced with concrete ties, I'm sure that the trains can go up to 110 mph.

If you think concrete ties are the only thing stopping >100mph running speeds on an elevated line constructed >100 years ago, I have a bridge to sell you a few miles away.

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In fact, at most only 10 cars can platform at FBA.

 

A 10 car platform is not that short. Not to mention it can only platform 10 cars on two tracks. Tracks 1 & 2 are 10 cars; tracks 3 & 4 are 8 cars, track 5 is 6 cars, and track 6 is 4 cars. Nostrand Ave. is 6 cars as well. The Far Rockaway branch east of Valley Stream is 10 cars though (except for Inwood and westbound Hewlett). Valley Stream is only 8 cars.

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A 10 car platform is not that short. Not to mention it can only platform 10 cars on two tracks. Tracks 1 & 2 are 10 cars; tracks 3 & 4 are 8 cars, track 5 is 6 cars, and track 6 is 4 cars. Nostrand Ave. is 6 cars as well. The Far Rockaway branch east of Valley Stream is 10 cars though (except for Inwood and westbound Hewlett). Valley Stream is only 8 cars.

Of course 10 cars isn't "short" but it shows the nature of the consists that run on the line when compared to the 12 car trains more routinely found running on the lines with more significant peak ridership, and going to Manhattan.

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Ok maybe 110mph is too extreme, but I'm sure that concrete ties and side railings can increase their current speed of 55mph to perhaps 75mph.

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It's not the tracks, it's the elevated structure itself that restricts the speed. If you had trains going too fast, over time it would get fatigue and be in danger of falling down from stress cracks and the like. A much larger viaduct on (NJT) territory looks fine from a distance, but the footings are crumbling after being in service for so long with trains going fast, there is now a speed restriction though.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moodna_Viaduct

 

- A

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Awesome pics!

 

Perfect "entire train" shots! They should've replaced the tracks with concrete ties as well as adding a railings and a yellow workers' path on the sides like the subway viaducts. Every time a train goes by, I'm always afraid that it'll derail and fall off the viaduct. If the wooden ties are replaced with concrete ties, I'm sure that the trains can go up to 110 mph.

 

Actually they are embarking on a project that will eventually rehab the Atlantic Avenue viaduct

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The Moodna Viaduct is also partially made of wood. I'm surprised that it can carry diesel locomotives when the Manhasset Viaduct, which is entirely made of steel cannot carry DM30ACs.

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The Moodna Viaduct is also partially made of wood. I'm surprised that it can carry diesel locomotives when the Manhasset Viaduct, which is entirely made of steel cannot carry DM30ACs.

Untrue. The Manhasset Viaduct can and has supported DE/DMs. The only limitation for them on the branch is the inability to platform at the terminal in PW because of height restrictions.

A train led by a DM ran on the branch after the blizzard of February '06, simultaneously clearing the tracks and third rail. The crew switched ends just before reaching the platform at PW.

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