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The New York accent


MTR Admiralty

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The word idea is said like idear...

And the word saw is said like sawr...

The rest is hard to explain.

I still remember the good ol' days in 8th grade when I had plenty of teachers with a New York accent.

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I still have a slight one, MTR Admiralty.

Can I get a description of the sounds and a comparison of them to General American? I hear some of my teachers speaking with one. For example, the h sound in human is lost.

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I'll try. In certain words, er is replaced by oi. I have a bad habit of spelling "certainly" as it sounds (soitenly). In this example, "certain" would be spelled soiten. Another bad habit I have is pronouncing "Houston" (both street and city) as House-tun knowing that the Manhattan Street was named for Mr. William Houstoun and that the second u was dropped.

 

Certain words are pronounced as "contractions": i.e. Greenwich (Street or Village sounds like Gren-itch (or Gwen-itch); Gloucester sounds like Glou-ster).

 

Other examples:

* Long Island (pronounced) Lawnguylon

* New York (pronounced) Noo Yawk

* Southern (pronounced something like) Sudawan

* Square (pronounced) Squair

* Dark (pronounced) Dawk

* Park (pronounced) Pock

* Mark (pronounced) Mock

* Coffee (pronounced something like) cough-ee

 

In another case, d takes the place of th so that this sounds like dis; these sounds like dese; those sounds like dose; that sounds like dat and them sounds like dem.

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Canarsie is pronounced something like Ca-naa-see;

Harlem is pronounced something like Haa-lem

 

And we have our shorthand:

 

* Lex for Lexington

* Tribeca for TRIangle BElow CAnal (Street)

* Metro for Metroplitan

* DUMBO for Down Under (the) Manhattan Bridge Overpass

* Ya for You (as in "Jeezus, can't ya come home to me soba, Barney?")

* Box for Intersection (as in "Don't block the box!")

* On Line for waiting ( as in *I hadda stand on line at Macy's)

 

"Watcha closin' dawrs!"

"Fuhgeddabouit!"

 

The Wizard Of Oz (1939) is a great movie - listen carefully to the Cowardly Lion as he pronounces words with the New York accent.

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Canarsie is pronounced something like Ca-naa-see;

Harlem is pronounced something like Haa-lem

 

And we have our shorthand:

 

* Lex for Lexington

* Tribeca for TRIangle BElow CAnal (Street)

* Metro for Metroplitan

* DUMBO for Down Under (the) Manhattan Bridge Overpass

* Ya for You (as in "Jeezus, can't ya come home to me soba, Barney?")

* Box for Intersection (as in "Don't block the box!")

* On Line for waiting ( as in *I hadda stand on line at Macy's)

 

"Watcha closin' dawrs!"

"Fuhgeddabouit!"

 

The Wizard Of Oz (1939) is a great movie - listen carefully to the Cowardly Lion as he pronounces words with the New York accent.

The Cowardly Lion was a mockery of Wall Street, according to my AP American History teacher. So the New York accent is indeed appropriate.

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Even though I was born and raised in New York, a lot of people tell me I don't have a New York accent. Maybe it is because my parents were born and raised in Pittsburgh and they moved to New York a couple years before I was born.

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I have the more "urban" NYC accent that's laced with slang (blame South Jamaica), I also have some Southern mixed in according to a lot of people I talk to.

 

Lol @ Brighton Local, you hit it right on the head.

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