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D Service Change.. R Suspension..


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This looks kind of fishy tho ! ?

 

 

Due to signal trouble between the 36th Street Station and 9th Avenue Station, (D)train service is running on the (N) line in both directions from the 36th Street Station to the Coney Island-Stillwell Avenue Station.

 

then......

 

Due to a train with mechanical problems at the 77th Street Station, (R) train service has been suspended in both directions from the 36th Street Station to the Bay Ridge-95th Street.

 

 

Wonder if theres more to it...Over-run or Derailment ? ? Or maybe its just a clusterfuk of stuff happening together

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I was affected by that. There were problems at 59th Street and the train was held just before Bay Ridge Avenue, so they ended up walking to 86th Street for the S93.

 

By the way, why does it say that they terminate the train at 36th Street, if they did, indeed, terminate the trains there? It is easier to terminate at 59th Street.

59th Street: http://images.nycsubway.org/trackmap/bigbklyn-3.png

36th Street: http://images.nycsubway.org/trackmap/bigbklyn-2.png

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My train was the Romeo that was held at 36th Street, but then proceeded to 45th Street and held there. Operating motor 9803. The B63 bus was jam packed. I had my radio on me and I didn't hear about anything bad, such as a 12-9 or derailments. I was able to pick up both incidents in the tunnel. There were plenty of TSS's at 36th Street boarding the Deltas when S/B Deltas were trying to go over the West End.

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My train was the Romeo that was held at 36th Street, but then proceeded to 45th Street and held there. Operating motor 9800. The B63 bus was jam packed. I had my radio on me and I didn't hear about anything bad, such as a 12-9 or derailments. I was able to pick up both incidents in the tunnel. There were plenty of TSS's at 36th Street boarding the Deltas when S/B Deltas were trying to go over the West End.

 

Since when was 9800 a motor car?

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I was affected by that. There were problems at 59th Street and the train was held just before Bay Ridge Avenue, so they ended up walking to 86th Street for the S93.

 

By the way, why does it say that they terminate the train at 36th Street, if they did, indeed, terminate the trains there? It is easier to terminate at 59th Street.

59th Street: http://images.nycsubway.org/trackmap/bigbklyn-3.png

36th Street: http://images.nycsubway.org/trackmap/bigbklyn-2.png

 

They can not terminated at 59 Street right now. The Sea Beach express track and switches is OOS because they are putting new (assuming, more likely) concrete ties instead of poorly 10+ year rotten timber tracks.

 

They likely dump the passengers at 36 St and turn around at 9 Av.

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You know I did see them putting in new tracks along the (N)'s Sea Beach Line. I also noticed that they had torn apart sections of the former (NX) track via Coney Island. They seem to be using concrete on those tracks to promote longer lasting track sections. Though I do wish that they didn't tear down those former (NX) tracks. It was really fun when they use to do rehab on the West End Line (D) and they would send the (D) racing down those former (NX) tracks. When I was younger and even now I thought of that as really fun. Especially when you pass by a local bound (N) train.

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You know I did see them putting in new tracks along the (N)'s Sea Beach Line. I also noticed that they had torn apart sections of the former (NX) track via Coney Island. They seem to be using concrete on those tracks to promote longer lasting track sections. Though I do wish that they didn't tear down those former (NX) tracks. It was really fun when they use to do rehab on the West End Line (D) and they would send the (D) racing down those former (NX) tracks. When I was younger and even now I thought of that as really fun. Especially when you pass by a local bound (N) train.

 

That (NX) track has sections a lot older than 10+ years, I can assure you of that. MOW has slapped a speed restriction on much of it, which is why most (N) GOs in the last several years have operated via the West End instead of the (NX) track. (R) Put-ins still use this track before entering service at 36 St during the PM rush.

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That (NX) track has sections a lot older than 10+ years, I can assure you of that. MOW has slapped a speed restriction on much of it, which is why most (N) GOs in the last several years have operated via the West End instead of the (NX) track. (R) Put-ins still use this track before entering service at 36 St during the PM rush.

 

WRONG, there is no speed restriction on the middle track on the Sea Beach... It's out of service. They have ripped it up from 8th Av to Ft. Hamilton Pkwy. This is what happens when T/Os rip down the track at 30 MPH on track that should have been replaced 10 or more years ago.

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WRONG, there is no speed restriction on the middle track on the Sea Beach... It's out of service. They have ripped it up from 8th Av to Ft. Hamilton Pkwy. This is what happens when T/Os rip down the track at 30 MPH on track that should have been replaced 10 or more years ago.

 

I'm definitely out of the loop, thank you for clarifying. Although I believe there was such a restriction prior to the track being out of service because of these T/Os running at 30 mph.

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I'm definitely out of the loop, thank you for clarifying. Although I believe there was such a restriction prior to the track being out of service because of these T/Os running at 30 mph.

 

Yea, there had been a speed restriction. 10 MPH from end to end that had actually been in place for a few years. Those tracks were in terrible shape and are long over due for some work.

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In my opinion, the Sea Beach track construction looks like a half-assed job right now. Small segments of tracks are still using wooden ties between long stretches of concrete ties along the northbound track, and the southbound track has only concrete ties between Kings Highway and Avenue U and a short segment north of the Coney Island terminal. The Brighton line is about the same. I look out the the side window just East of Queensboro Plaza and it looks like even the switches use concrete ties for the LIRR—something the MTA appears to be unable to do for the subway. I just don't understand the inconsistency here.

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In my opinion, the Sea Beach track construction looks like a half-assed job right now. Small segments of tracks are still using wooden ties between long stretches of concrete ties along the northbound track, and the southbound track has only concrete ties between Kings Highway and Avenue U and a short segment north of the Coney Island terminal. The Brighton line is about the same. I look out the the side window just East of Queensboro Plaza and it looks like even the switches use concrete ties for the LIRR—something the MTA appears to be unable to do for the subway. I just don't understand the inconsistency here.

 

Just for the record, the Sea Beach "Express" track is being rebuilt with wooden ties, they had the panels there for more than a week before they started ripping out the track.

 

As for the concrete trurnout issue, it is a big decision to make for the NYCTA, basically a "once and for all" issue. Basically once the TA decides to go concrete, all new turnouts will be concrete (and that's a lot of turnouts). I'm not sure of the exact dynamics with ties in a turnout, but I would hazard a guess that a concrete tie failure in a turnout would be worse to deal with than a wood tie failure.

 

Also, the (MTA) does not make these decisions, the NYCTA and the LIRR make these decisions, so there is no inconsistencies.

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Also, the (MTA) does not make these decisions, the NYCTA and the LIRR make these decisions, so there is no inconsistencies.

The inconsistencies still lay in the fact that small segments are still wooden (and it's not because of switches being in the vicinity). Travel between 8 Avenue and Coney Island on both the Manhattan-bound and Coney Island-bound (N) and you'll see what I mean. Some wooden segments are as short as a few meters. It's a technicality that most people shouldn't give a damn about as long as trains can run on it and get people around safely, but I'm just curious what the rhymes and reasons are for these seemingly random design decisions.

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The inconsistencies still lay in the fact that small segments are still wooden (and it's not because of switches being in the vicinity). Travel between 8 Avenue and Coney Island on both the Manhattan-bound and Coney Island-bound (N) and you'll see what I mean. Some wooden segments are as short as a few meters. It's a technicality that most people shouldn't give a damn about as long as trains can run on it and get people around safely, but I'm just curious what the rhymes and reasons are for these seemingly random design decisions.

 

Simple, those sections don't need to be replaced yet. When it comes time to replace those sections, they will be replaced with concrete ties.

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The inconsistencies still lay in the fact that small segments are still wooden (and it's not because of switches being in the vicinity). Travel between 8 Avenue and Coney Island on both the Manhattan-bound and Coney Island-bound (N) and you'll see what I mean. Some wooden segments are as short as a few meters. It's a technicality that most people shouldn't give a damn about as long as trains can run on it and get people around safely, but I'm just curious what the rhymes and reasons are for these seemingly random design decisions.

 

Trust me, when it comes down to organizing this kind of work, location is everything. Trackwork is usually specified down to the tenth of a foot. If a good section of track doesn't need replacing, it isn't hard to leave it in place. Also there is much time in planning this work; the only time it is done quick is for emergencies, like when that car fell on the tracks at New Utrecht Ave.

 

It's also a matter of money. All that concrete trackwork you see in Sunnyside is MTACC-ESA money, which is available and allocated for that purpose. All the work you see on Sea Beach is NYCTA money, which is limited. Even in the Sunnyside area, the track is replaced only if the track is being realigned, otherwise there is plenty of wood to see there.

 

 

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Simple, those sections don't need to be replaced yet. When it comes time to replace those sections, they will be replaced with concrete ties.

 

It's a waste of money to just replace everything, especially when everyone's crying broke.

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