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sirtiger

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Anyone can tell me some details about the button on the ceiling on the LIRR? Its located by the doors over every car.

I know if the trains are at a station, press that button....the doors will open.

I admit on two occasions, I fell asleep on the train.,...doors closed on me as I wanted to exit. I pressed the button & the doors opened. Curious if I would get in trouble of the conductors knew I did this.

I took a pic for reference

 

LIRR_zps91094fca.jpg

Edited by sirtiger
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That is for the conductor to signal to the engineer. 

 

By pressing it does not automatically open the doors. It's just a coincidence that the conductor opened the doors back up when you pressed it.

 

Could you get in trouble by the conductor by pressing it?  Absolutely.  Could you get in trouble by more than just the conductor?  You bet!

 

The moral of the story here is don't fall asleep with out setting an alarm of some sorts (everyone with a cell phone has one).  Just because it's an emergency (to you) that you are missed your stop doesn't make it a true emergency. 

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That is for the conductor to signal to the engineer. 

 

By pressing it does not automatically open the doors. It's just a coincidence that the conductor opened the doors back up when you pressed it.

 

Could you get in trouble by the conductor by pressing it?  Absolutely.  Could you get in trouble by more than just the conductor?  You bet!

 

The moral of the story here is don't fall asleep with out setting an alarm of some sorts (everyone with a cell phone has one).  Just because it's an emergency (to you) that you are missed your stop doesn't make it a true emergency. 

LOL I don't know how he could fall asleep on those trains anyway.  I can never get a nap on the Hudson Line.  By the time I sit down (if I can get a seat), within a few stops, the conductor is coming to collect the tickets and before you know it Grand Central is coming up.  Aside from that there are a few seedy characters that get on in the Bronx there at University Heights and Morris Heights from time to time unexpectedly when they scrap together the $8.25 fare, so I wouldn't feel comfortable falling asleep.

Edited by Via Garibaldi 8

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I admit on two occasions, I fell asleep on the train.,...

 

Heh. Yeah? Check this out:  Once I was on the (D) from the Bronx meaning to get to 7th Ave to get to the (E) to Queens, fell asleep, dead asleep like a rock. Ended up on the West End Line somewhere by the time I came to. Was two hrs late for work so I had to lie to my boss and say my alternator broke in my car and had to take the train. Fortunately he let it go. Yeah gotta be careful.

Edited by realizm
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@Via: Which should also apply to him because given his location he lives along one of the crowdest branches of the LIRR (the Port Washington branch).

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What kind of signal does it send to the engineer?

 

I do realize it doesn't automatically open the door as that would be dangerous....but I assumed it sends a signal to open the door if it was safe enough to do so.

 

In my life, I probably fell asleep pass my stop a dozen times or so over a few decades....both LIRR, NJT and nyc subways. nyc subways is easier to just so back a few stops. LIRR and NJT rail is potentially tougher because it depends on the schedule...some lines don't have a schedule train going back as long as 3+ hrs.  Yes, its my fault missing stops but it quite rare that it happens to me in the grand scheme of things.

 

I realize I maybe reprimanded by starting this inquiry but I rather learn from members here who are far more familiar with this....as I always believe it more stupid not to ask if I thought was a stupid question.

Edited by sirtiger

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i think the signal is telling engineer it time to go or proceed. even tho most train have lights when all doors is closed but sometime it failed.

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What kind of signal does it send to the engineer?

 

I do realize it doesn't automatically open the door as that would be dangerous....but I assumed it sends a signal to open the door if it was safe enough to do so.

 

 

When used by the conductor it does nothing more than send a buzz to the engineer when pressed (the engineer can also buzz back). 

 

Without going into detail different numbers and lengths of buzzes mean different things. 

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When used by the conductor it does nothing more than send a buzz to the engineer when pressed (the engineer can also buzz back). 

 

Without going into detail different numbers and lengths of buzzes mean different things. 

 

sounds like a secret handshake

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There is no public sign on the buzzer that says "press this button to open the doors if you fell asleep and missed your stop" so you have no business pressing it.

 

I heard a story from an engineer once that there was this one conductor and engineer who worked along the Montauk Branch together for many years.  Whenever the conductor closed the doors and hit the buzzer twice to signal the engineer to go, the conductor would always give a wave or some sort of prearranged hand signal out the window to the engineer to go with it.

 

One day the two were working together along the Montauk branch.  They made the usual station stop and the doors closed, however the train did not get going.  An impatient passenger decided he would speed up the process by hitting the buzzer twice himself to signal the engineer.  The engineer however, looking back for the hand signal from the conductor did not see it, so he didn't move the train.  It turns out the conductor had fallen under the train and had broken his leg.  If the engineer proceeded only on the passenger's false buzzer, he would have killed the conductor. 

 

Needless to say the brakeman later found the conductor under the train, and when they found out the buzzer had been hit by an impatient passenger, that passenger was in one heap of trouble.

 

Chances are, if a button doesn't look like its for you to press, it probably isn't.

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  It turns out the conductor had fallen under the train and had broken his leg.  If the engineer proceeded only on the passenger's false buzzer, he would have killed the conductor. 

 

Needless to say the brakeman later found the conductor under the train, and when they found out the buzzer had been hit by an impatient passenger, that passenger was in one heap of trouble.

 

that is terrible.  well, thank you for your insight

 

I almost always see the conductor doing the hand signal (sometimes with a flashlight) right before the door closes.  Then there is always one conductor looking out the window.   So I assume this is normal protocol.

Edited by sirtiger

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I almost always see the conductor doing the hand signal (sometimes with a flashlight) right before the door closes.  Then there is always one conductor looking out the window.   So I assume this is normal protocol.

 

The hand signal is usually done by the assistant conductor (aka trainman) to let the conductor know it's clear to close up the doors as there are many stations that have blind spots from the conductor.  The conductor is the one physically opening and closing the doors.

 

I've worked with crews that never use the buzzer signals period, only hand signals.

 

sirtiger, it's not meant to be a secret of any sort.  The buzzers are used for the relaying of directives such as start, stop, back up, drop pantagraphs, apply brakes, etc.  I'm certainly not going to outline what each signal is for two reasons, 1) I don't know LIRR's signals as I don't work for them and 2) the public knowing too much of what goes on can be dangerous as was illustrated in a previous post.

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The hand signal is usually done by the assistant conductor (aka trainman) to let the conductor know it's clear to close up the doors as there are many stations that have blind spots from the conductor.  The conductor is the one physically opening and closing the doors.

Fordham comes to mind on MNRR, the station has a slight curve on the northern end.

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Fordham comes to mind on MNRR, the station has a slight curve on the northern end.

 

Not too mention that it's partly under a building.

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The buzzer is sometimes used by train crews ,but mainly used by us when we are performing maintenance on the train in the yards.Communicating between ourselves or with the car inspectors. Yard crews use it when drilling also.

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Since passengers can pretty much be assumed to be child-like idiots, why is the buzzer in a place where passengers can play with it? Seems like a recipe for disaster.

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Fordham comes to mind on MNRR, the station has a slight curve on the northern end.

 

The Fordham track 4 platform (west side of the tracks) is one of the more difficult platforms to safely operate the doors.  Between the more than slight curve and the tunnel on the south end it's bad. 

 

 

Since passengers can pretty much be assumed to be child-like idiots, why is the buzzer in a place where passengers can play with it? Seems like a recipe for disaster.

 

It is used by the train crew in spots.  Fordham for example.  If I'm operating the doors at the platform previously described, to close them I will key myself out and close the doors from the panel (the keyed out door still being open), then I'll close up that door and buzz the engineer from the one on the ceiling. 

 

If you look hard enough there's more than just buzzers to worry about idiots keeping their paws off of. 

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The Fordham track 4 platform (west side of the tracks) is one of the more difficult platforms to safely operate the doors.  Between the more than slight curve and the tunnel on the south end it's bad. 

 

 

 

It is used by the train crew in spots.  Fordham for example.  If I'm operating the doors at the platform previously described, to close them I will key myself out and close the doors from the panel (the keyed out door still being open), then I'll close up that door and buzz the engineer from the one on the ceiling. 

 

If you look hard enough there's more than just buzzers to worry about idiots keeping their paws off of. 

The gaps at a lot of Metro North stations are insane.  If I'm in a hurry to get to the train and it's raining or something, I have to be very careful.

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The buzzers are for train crew use only. Touching them interferes with the safe movement of the train. The buzzers have different meanings and when we get erratic buzzers, we know it's usually a passenger trying to get off the train. If the train hasn't moved yet, we'll probably open the doors again, but using the passenger emergency intercom in the vestibule is preferable.

Edited by tun

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PEI shouldnt be used for getting off the last minute. it should be used for sick,injured,some kind of fight /brawl or something wrong with coach itself to get conductor attention. There is one time i fell asleep on the train coming from the airport and i ask the conductor to open the door but he wont even tho the train hadnt move yet. what a dipstick that guy was (njt employee). i will never forget his face and never forgive him.

 

There was another incident with a family who was trying to get off a stop and there was plenty of announcement about center door is not opening because of low level platform(njt little silver station). This family stand there and didnt realize the door is not opening and realizes while the door is closing, ran to the other door and hit the buzzer(we can hear it on the intercom) and somehow they was able to get off. what sick world we all live in that can't understand conductor instruction. 

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The Fordham track 4 platform (west side of the tracks) is one of the more difficult platforms to safely operate the doors.  Between the more than slight curve and the tunnel on the south end it's bad. 

 

 

 

It is used by the train crew in spots.  Fordham for example.  If I'm operating the doors at the platform previously described, to close them I will key myself out and close the doors from the panel (the keyed out door still being open), then I'll close up that door and buzz the engineer from the one on the ceiling. 

 

If you look hard enough there's more than just buzzers to worry about idiots keeping their paws off of. 

Ha! I'm scared to even know...

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PEI shouldnt be used for getting off the last minute. it should be used for sick,injured,some kind of fight /brawl or something wrong with coach itself to get conductor attention. There is one time i fell asleep on the train coming from the airport and i ask the conductor to open the door but he wont even tho the train hadnt move yet. what a dipstick that guy was (njt employee). i will never forget his face and never forgive him.

 

There was another incident with a family who was trying to get off a stop and there was plenty of announcement about center door is not opening because of low level platform(njt little silver station). This family stand there and didnt realize the door is not opening and realizes while the door is closing, ran to the other door and hit the buzzer(we can hear it on the intercom) and somehow they was able to get off. what sick world we all live in that can't understand conductor instruction. 

Well, I agree that the PEI shouldn't be used for that purpose but 95% of the time that's what it's used for.

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There is one time i fell asleep on the train coming from the airport and i ask the conductor to open the door but he wont even tho the train hadnt move yet. what a dipstick that guy was (njt employee).

 

While I don't know the specifics of your situation.  There are plenty of times where I've closed the doors and refused to reopen them before the train moved.  Why?  Because it's not safe to do so.  Period!  I'm not willing to suffer the consequences of anything happening.

 

The general rider doesn't realize what it takes to run a train.  If I opened that door and the passenger got hurt several things could happen.  1) Get suspended with out pay.  2) lose my job and 3) face criminal charges for negligence.  Yes, even before the train starts moving.

Edited by Truckie

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Yeah, but on the other hand: they do allow that in Belgium and I've yet to hear one incident because of that (letting someone in or out of a moving train).

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