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61 new X3-45 coaches for Greyhound


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Sainte-Claire, QC, April 28, 2011 – The partnership between Greyhound and Prevost which began in 2007 continues with the signing of a new order for sixty-one (61) Prevost X3-45 motorcoaches.

 

Prevost is proud that Greyhound has once again chosen Prevost as their primary coach supplier. The decision is based on Prevost’s commitment to premium quality and timely delivery. The buses have been designed with features and options that meet the demanding needs of Greyhound and their customers.

 

Dann Wiltgen, Prevost Vice President of Corporate Accounts, comments, “The partnership between Greyhound and Prevost continues to expand beyond the traditional customer/supplier relationship. Going forward, I am confident our organizations will continue to share our expertise and synergies, maximizing our mutual success."

 

Equipped with Volvo D13 EPA 2010 engines and Allison transmissions, the coaches will provide a clean, fuel-efficient drive train. In addition, the coaches are outfitted with features placing a priority on passenger safety and comfort. Prevost safety features include the Prevost Electronic Stability Program, the Beru Tire Pressure Monitoring System and the Automatic Fire Suppression System. The 50-seat coaches also boast dual 1800 watt inverters powering 110 volt outlets and Wi-Fi Internet access throughout the coach cabin for each passenger. Other highlights include an Aesys electronic destination sign and Prevost’s exclusive Swap & Plug wheelchair lift.

 

“Our customers have complimented the smooth ride of the Prevost coach we currently have in service, as well as the amenities we provide for their enjoyment,” said Dave Leach, president and CEO, Greyhound Lines, Inc. “It is on our coaches where customers spend the majority of their time, so with the introduction of additional Prevost coaches to our fleet, we can continue to deliver a comfortable, safe and enjoyable ride for our customers.”

 

Delivery of the first 35 X3-45 coaches is scheduled for May, June and July and the remaining 26 coaches will be delivered later in the year.

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Sounds like Greyhound can't make up their minds. First it was F*** MCI then they ordered more buses and now back to Prevost. This is bite them in the wallet later when it comes time for overhauls.

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Sounds like Greyhound can't make up their minds. First it was F*** MCI then they ordered more buses and now back to Prevost. This is bite them in the wallet later when it comes time for overhauls.

 

Prevost is not a cheap mans bus. MCI should and always be the 1st choice since they are so much easier to maintain.

 

Even though I had my misgivings about Greyhound buying the X3s they have been keeping the up pretty well. Part of that is the X3s aren't on "48 States" service. They pretty much keep them running in the Northeast meaning they see the better garages (Atlantic City and Richmond) in the GLI system. And they are being very strict on disciplining drivers who damage the X3s. If those buses were running coast to coast they might be falling apart by now.

 

@553: They have had their challenges maintaining the X3s because their maintenance people are very pro-MCI and wasn't interested in learning the way of the Prevost....which can be costly. It will be interesting to see how these buses age (especially once the warranty is up!). I'm biased but I don't see the X3s taking the abuse and neglect the MC-12s and DL3s took.

 

Means more Greyhound lines rejects being sent to Greyhound Canada

 

Sorry to say I think the DL3s US GLI doesn't rehab are gonna get sent to Canada. For some reason Greyhound Canada always seems to get the short end of the stick on everything. I think what those guys pull off up there in that operating environment is nothing short of a miracle!

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Sorry to say I think the DL3s US GLI doesn't rehab are gonna get sent to Canada. For some reason Greyhound Canada always seems to get the short end of the stick on everything. I think what those guys pull off up there in that operating environment is nothing short of a miracle!

 

There has been rumors that Greyhound Canada may get some of the referb DL3's

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I heard those buses are awesome (Even though they suck at tight turns).

 

Congrats to Greyhound for diversifying its fleet.

 

The Prevost X3-45, even though it has the longest wheelbase in the industry, has a turning radius of 42.6 feet.

 

The MCI D4500 takes 47 feet.

 

And the rear axle on the Prevost does not even steer, although it is easy to raise the tag to assist turning in extreme tight corners.

 

The long wheelbase on the X3-45 yields, IMHO, the best ride on the road today.

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I agree, the Prevost is a great vehicle, both for the passenger and the driver. Even though the computers do act up at times, the smooth ride it provides is almost unparalleled.

 

On another note, Bolt just took hold of 15 new MCI D4505s, which will begin seeing service next week.

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can NJT use prevosts?? should they

 

They could. But I have my money on the fact that NJT will watch the MTA closely when their order of X3s come in. However NJT is a very MCI nation so them getting X3s would be very slim but I wouldnt rule it out if the MTA Prevost order goes well.

 

@BZ Good points there.

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No rational carrier will be blindly loyal to only one manufacturer, regardless of their past relationship. They will make their purchases mainly on the merits of what is currently on the market, with a minor consideration to what their staff and stores are familiar with.

Case in point--Greyhound. The old Greyhound Corp. owned MCI and was mainly responsible for MCI's rise to dominance in the industry for a long time.

When the Greyhound Corp. broke up, and sold off both the busline and MCI, that started a change in what MCI put out. Greyhound Lines was so burned at what they received in the way of the 'G' models, caused them to look elsewhere for their new purchases, and opened the door to Prevost. They have also purchased some D4505's, so the jury is still out.

 

Other carriers are also dabbling with buses from different manufacturers in search for a good line bus.

Isn't it great that there is a choice and competition for new bus sales?

Hopefully, it will lead to better products all around.

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No rational carrier will be blindly loyal to only one manufacturer, regardless of their past relationship. They will make their purchases mainly on the merits of what is currently on the market, with a minor consideration to what their staff and stores are familiar with.

Case in point--Greyhound. The old Greyhound Corp. owned MCI and was mainly responsible for MCI's rise to dominance in the industry for a long time.

When the Greyhound Corp. broke up, and sold off both the busline and MCI, that started a change in what MCI put out. Greyhound Lines was so burned at what they received in the way of the 'G' models, caused them to look elsewhere for their new purchases, and opened the door to Prevost. They have also purchased some D4505's, so the jury is still out.

 

Other carriers are also dabbling with buses from different manufacturers in search for a good line bus.

Isn't it great that there is a choice and competition for new bus sales?

Hopefully, it will lead to better products all around.

 

Were the G series that bad? What's the story behind them?

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I don't know all the details, but when Greyhound was shopping for a lower cost line bus to replace their MC12's, MCI sold them on the G series. These were built by DINA in Mexico when MCI was briefly owned by DINA. No driver or mechanic that I've spoken with had much good to say about these buses. And I've heard that there was some litigation between Greyhound and MCI over them.

Now there are still some MC12's running, but the newer G's are mostly gone.

And the Prevost X3-45 became the first non-MCI bus purchased by Greyhound Lines in the US since what, the last GMC PD4107's in 1966 or '67?

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Were the G series that bad? What's the story behind them?

 

Greyhound came up with most of the specs for the "G". It was supposed to have J-model comfort at MC-12 prices, but just ended up be a total piece of crap. There were numerous build issues and it seemed like every week one was going up in flames somewhere in the country. There was a big lawsuit between Greyhound and MCI over the "G", a lawsuit some say pushed MCI into bankruptcy. My personal feeling is the 70 D4505s were payment on that lawsuit but I cannot confirm that.

 

What Greyhound is doing is pretty smart pitting Prevost and MCI against each other to produce a well built economical line coach. MCI was the one and only for Greyhound for years and as a MCI "fanboy" it hurts me to say this but, when they had GLI in the bag alot of stuff started sliding down hill. I see some of the same issues at Peter Pan because we are exclusively all-MCI, buses coming in with W/C lifts not working, electrical issues among other things.....we've had one bus away on warranty stuff so much we call it the ghost bus because it's here one day and gone another. A Prevost demo shows up in Springfield I bet our next batch of buses are the most well put together buses in the world.

 

I'm still not completely sold on the X3s in line service, especially since it's replacing the MC-12 which I consider by far the BEST line run coach EVER! But that's what First Group wants, so that's what we get to enjoy.

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Greyhound came up with most of the specs for the "G". It was supposed to have J-model comfort at MC-12 prices, but just ended up be a total piece of crap. There were numerous build issues and it seemed like every week one was going up in flames somewhere in the country. There was a big lawsuit between Greyhound and MCI over the "G", a lawsuit some say pushed MCI into bankruptcy. My personal feeling is the 70 D4505s were payment on that lawsuit but I cannot confirm that.

 

What Greyhound is doing is pretty smart pitting Prevost and MCI against each other to produce a well built economical line coach. MCI was the one and only for Greyhound for years and as a MCI "fanboy" it hurts me to say this but, when they had GLI in the bag alot of stuff started sliding down hill. I see some of the same issues at Peter Pan because we are exclusively all-MCI, buses coming in with W/C lifts not working, electrical issues among other things.....we've had one bus away on warranty stuff so much we call it the ghost bus because it's here one day and gone another. A Prevost demo shows up in Springfield I bet our next batch of buses are the most well put together buses in the world.

 

I'm still not completely sold on the X3s in line service, especially since it's replacing the MC-12 which I consider by far the BEST line run coach EVER! But that's what First Group wants, so that's what we get to enjoy.

 

Thanks a lot for the info. I didn't realize there was so much discontent with MCI amongst Greyhound and Peter Pan; especially Peter Pan who I thought loved their J series.

 

I'm more of an MC-9 fan, but I do have a lot of fond memories with the MC-12s.

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the MC-12 which I consider by far the BEST line run coach EVER!

 

As far as MCI goes, I'll agree with you.

Too bad you're too young to have experienced the GMC PD4106. If you had, you might feel differently...:(:P

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Thanks a lot for the info. I didn't realize there was so much discontent with MCI amongst Greyhound and Peter Pan; especially Peter Pan who I thought loved their J series.

 

Right now I can tell at Peter Pan it not so much discontent than just plain aggravation at MCI because we KNOW they can turn out good buses yet buses show up brand new with things wrong with them. As far as the J-Model this company has a love/hate relationship with that bus. Peter Jr and Tom Picknelly love the bus for it's looks and supposed ease of maintenance. The mechanics absolutely hate these buses with a passion because alot of the systems are unnecessarily complicated and they fact that the "J" doesn't seem to age well. They go from riding like Caddy's to dumptrucks really quickly. From a driver's point I don't like the bus for numerous reasons (mirror setup,wallowing ride,brakes), for me it's a DL/4505 or nothing.

 

As far as MCI goes, I'll agree with you.

Too bad you're too young to have experienced the GMC PD4106. If you had, you might feel differently...:P:)

 

Hahaha....alot of our senior guys I talk to say the same exact thing! And don't get these guys talking on Eagles!:(

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And don't get these guys talking on Eagles!:(

 

Uh, Oh! Now you've done it.:P

 

The Eagle bus's Torsilastic suspension offered perhaps the smoothest ride on earth, this side of a Pullman car, maybe even smoother.

That is, as long as the shocks were in good shape. If not, the very long travel in the suspension, which could make potholes feel non-existant, could literally throw you out of the drivers seat if not belted in.

The Eagle was a pleasure to drive on curvy highways such as the western Pennsylvannia Turnpike, the steering was superb. It held the road very well on slippery roads.

 

The GMC PD4106, did not ride as well as an Eagle, but comparing the two, the GM was like a sports car partially due to its five foot shorter length, foot lower height, and 8,000 pound lower weight, with the same engine and power.

In addition, the GM Coach had by far the best ergonomic design for the driver.

The seating position behing the wheel. the superb visibility, the way the shift lever was just perfectly at hand--it all summed up to a very comfortable drive that has not been matched by any bus since.

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I used to know all the MCI models by heart decades ago, but when they ended the MC series, and started this new letter series; I can't remember what is what.

 

Especially the E, vs G, vs J.

 

So the G4100 is the one with all square windows, and has no front sign space, and that introduced the frameless windows and white "stormtrooper" back (that then appeared on the D's), right? Yet what I'm seeing is that the G4500 has the windows that get larger in the front (the bottom edge curves down, like the E and J, so that they're not all square).

 

Is that correct?

That's what's making it more confusing.

Because you mention G's on Peter Pan, and I also seem mention of them on Greyhound, but these must be the 4500's, because the one with the all square windows I have never seen on those lines. The only place I see them is on small charter companies.

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Thanks. though it's hard to tell on the picture of the 4100, because of the way they paint it to resemble the E, J and G4500 windows. (i.e. the frontmost windows are still square, but the black pain still curves downward to level with the door window and windshield).

 

I guess only 25 being divided between Greyhound, Coach USA, Academy, Martz, Peter Pan and Van Galder (never even heard of that one) is why I haven't noticed any on those large carriers. (I don't even ride like I used to, anyway).

 

Does Greyhound and Peter Pan still have the G4100's anywhere? Or did they get rid of them sometime after the test?

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Thanks. though it's hard to tell on the picture of the 4100, because of the way they paint it to resemble the E, J and G4500 windows. (i.e. the frontmost windows are still square, but the black pain still curves downward to level with the door window and windshield).

 

I guess only 25 being divided between Greyhound, Coach USA, Academy, Martz, Peter Pan and Van Galder (never even heard of that one) is why I haven't noticed any on those large carriers. (I don't even ride like I used to, anyway).

 

Does Greyhound and Peter Pan still have the G4100's anywhere? Or did they get rid of them sometime after the test?

 

http://www.busmag.com/PDF/Greyh2.pdf

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So now, the new MCI scheme (after 26 years, wow!) is coming together for me.

 

When the A models first came out, I know they were called "MC-10", and I did not even know there was a new model scheme. I had never heard of an MC-11, but then, the MC-12 came out, which was a cross between the MC-9 and 10.

 

This site http://busexplorer.com/NABus/MCI-Text.html says:

"(10 and 11 probably being unofficially used for other models)". So I knew what the 10 was, but not sure of the 11, and always wondered what it was. I did not know the difference between the A's, B's or C's, but thought of them all as "MC-10's". (I did notice that later ones on Greyhound used a switch to open the door, instead of that big metal pull down lever, and the luggage racks no longer had the doors). I had heard that they came in 96 0r 102' versions, but didn't think that was probably the 10/11 distinction.

 

The C came out next, and differed by the non-silver side, plus some interior and mechanical differences (these were probably the ones I saw on Greyhound in '89 and afterwards. Like 2280 I rode from NY to LA in:)).

The B came out after that, and was basically like a cross between the A and C. "The 96A3 and 96B3 are virtually undistinguishable", and "The rather rare 96B3 retained the old front end and stainless steel on the lower part of the sides, but the 102B3 received the new model front end...".

 

So now knowing the difference of the models, then I can figure that the MC-11 was probably the C model. And I guess the B as well, or at least could have been either. (The B was made to replace the A, co it could have been an extension of the model. The B and C began to blur, as the silver/paintable side option could eventually be ordered for either. Perhaps those features taken from either A or C are what would determine whether a B would have been a 10 or 11).

 

So extending the MC scheme, technically:

 

A/B: MC-10

C/(B?): MC-11

MC-12

D: MC-13

E: MC-14

F: MC-15

G: MC-16

H (skipped because of Prevost "H")

I skipped for same reason it's not used as a NYC subway route

J: MC-17

 

(Wondering if the D4005/4505 would be considered a different "MC" model, since they have the E/G/J style front. Perhaps just an MC-13A or something).

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