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RT Division cars vs PATH cars


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(The "I" from IRT got cut off)

 

I'm sorry if this question has come up before (I've searched around and I've never found a satisfactory answer).

 

Is the width of IRT Division cars the same as PATH trains? Would it be theoretically possible to run Division A trains through the PATH tunnels?

 

Also, sorry if this is the wrong forum, it was one or the other.

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According to Wikipedia(as reliable as a first grader, I know), PATH trains are 110 and 3/4 inches wide and IRT trains are 105 inches wide. PATH trains are too wide to operate on IRT tracks but too narrow to stop at BMT/IND stations(trains are 120 inches wide).

 

On a side note, the width of PATH trains are the same as that of MBTA Blue and Orange Line trains, as evidenced by the T ordering modified PA3 trains in 1978.

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No, PATH is a railroad.

 

That has nothing to do with the question. Yes a PATH cat could run on the subway, on bothe numbered lines and the lettered lines. PATH cars are also shorter so they could run faster around curves but this will never actually happen.

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That has nothing to do with the question. Yes a PATH cat could run on the subway, on bothe numbered lines and the lettered lines. PATH cars are also shorter so they could run faster around curves but this will never actually happen.
What is PATH third rail voltage rating?
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That has nothing to do with the question. Yes a PATH car could run on the subway, on both numbered lines and the lettered lines. PATH cars are also shorter so they could run faster around curves but this will never actually happen.

 

But aren't the Path cars slightly wider? Also can the Path tunnels handle cars slightly longer than 51' like the IRT cars?

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That has nothing to do with the question. Yes a PATH cat could run on the subway, on bothe numbered lines and the lettered lines. PATH cars are also shorter so they could run faster around curves but this will never actually happen.

nothing is impossible :P

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What is PATH third rail voltage rating?

600-650 so NYCT cars could operate and so could PATH cars.

But aren't the Path cars slightly wider? Also can the Path tunnels handle cars slightly longer than 51' like the IRT cars?

No, they are the same width but PATH cars are shorter.

nothing is impossible :P

I never said it was impossible, just that it won't happen.

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No, they are the same width but PATH cars are shorter.

Not to be rude or a hypocrite here, but what's your source? From my memory of riding PATH and IRT trains, I could have sworn PATH trains(and MBTA trains for that matter) felt noticeably wider than IRT trains.

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Well if they really needed to run PATH trains on the "RT Division", they could change the gauge of the wheels and then its possible. SEPTA did this back in the 90s with some budd M3s because the Route 100 trains were late.

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"Width" doesn't refer to the guage of the trains. Rather, it refers to how wide the passenger cabin, if you will, is. Almost every train and trolley in the United States, with several exceptions such as BART and some SEPTA lines, are the same guage: 4 feet 8.5 inches. It probably is currently possible to run IRT-sized trains on PATH trackage, but, if PATH trains are indeed wider than IRT trains, the gap between the trains and the platforms would be unsafe. The trains, not the guage, are too narrow. Likewise, PATH-sized trains can run on IRT trackage, but would scrape the platforms.

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Not to be rude or a hypocrite here, but what's your source? From my memory of riding PATH and IRT trains, I could have sworn PATH trains(and MBTA trains for that matter) felt noticeably wider than IRT trains.

 

My PA5 qualified maintenace person book says that the cars are 9 feet and 2 and 1/2 inches wide. If that don't convince you I don't know that will.

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According to Bombardier's website, the width of the R-142s are 8 feet 7 and 3/16 inches. That is 7 and 5/16 inches less than the 9 feet 2.5 inches of the PATH trains, as you stated. Unless either Bombardier or PATH are BSing, that is quite a difference in width. I guess I do need a little more convincing that they're the same.:(

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I suspect you are looking at measurements of different parts of the car.

 

At threshold plates, IRT cars are 8' 9.5" which I believe is the same on PATH

PATH widens further up, but I don't believe that the IRT would have problems if it ran cars which did the same. IRT tunnels are substantially larger than PATH ones.

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According to Wikipedia(as reliable as a first grader, I know), PATH trains are 110 and 3/4 inches wide and IRT trains are 105 inches wide. PATH trains are too wide to operate on IRT tracks but too narrow to stop at BMT/IND stations(trains are 120 inches wide).

 

On a side note, the width of PATH trains are the same as that of MBTA Blue and Orange Line trains, as evidenced by the T ordering modified PA3 trains in 1978.

 

Hmmm... I smell a Boston - New Jersey subway...:(

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No, PATH is a railroad.

 

What Kamen Rider means is that the PATH is recognized and regulated as a federal railroad (like the SIRT), because it shares trackage with NJT/Amtrak at Newark station. So, in order for the IRT to run on PATH, pretty much the entire subway system would need to be changed to meet FRA requirements (including trains, operators, signaling, etc).

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What Kamen Rider means is that the PATH is recognized and regulated as a federal railroad (like the SIRT), because it shares trackage with NJT/Amtrak at Newark station. So, in order for the IRT to run on PATH, pretty much the entire subway system would need to be changed to meet FRA requirements (including trains, operators, signaling, etc).

 

uh no.... you can not compare to SIRT, which they are no longer FRA compliant.

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What Kamen Rider means is that the PATH is recognized and regulated as a federal railroad (like the SIRT), because it shares trackage with NJT/Amtrak at Newark station. So, in order for the IRT to run on PATH, pretty much the entire subway system would need to be changed to meet FRA requirements (including trains, operators, signaling, etc).

Nothing really with PATH coming into Newark. It's because of the freight connection PATH has and also that one connection it has to the NJT/Amtrak trackage just outside of Harrison (not the station, but where the train is just passing the yard).

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