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QueensCzar248

Vignelli-era Map vs. Current Style

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Having a graphic design schooling, I personally prefer the Vignelli map of the early 70s as opposed to today's style. The Weekender on the MTA's website revived this design, and I think it's just easy to look at and easily follow each train line and find stations as opposed to the geographically correct but more of a road map version.

 

So what do you guys think: Would you like to see the Vignelli style revived for current maps such as The Weekender, or stick with the current style and why?

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Having a graphic design schooling, I personally prefer the Vignelli map of the early 70s as opposed to today's style. The Weekender on the MTA's website revived this design, and I think it's just easy to look at and easily follow each train line and find stations as opposed to the geographically correct but more of a road map version.

 

So what do you guys think: Would you like to see the Vignelli style revived for current maps such as The Weekender, or stick with the current style and why?

 

I like the current design, to me its easier to follow where stuff goes and whats in teh vicinity of the stations.

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I like the current design, to me its easier to follow where stuff goes and whats in teh vicinity of the stations.

 

The 1968 Map scheme was very colorful. I prefer the 1968 map even though it's not an option. The 2012 Map looks like every color is a service with multiple routings and terminals.

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If lines weren't so squished together in Manhattan and Downtown Brooklyn, I would've preferred a geographically accurate map. I've had a guy walk up to me at Coney Island asking me which train goes to Bay Parkway. They all do except for the (Q), but you'd have to know the area pretty darn well already to name specific train. (He was looking for the Bay Parkway by West 5~7 Street, by the way, so I sent him to the (N).)

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I prefer the 1968 map even though it's not an option.

 

I don't discriminate lol, we'll add all other maps to the mix here. The 68 map was pretty legible but colorful as well.

 

If lines weren't so squished together in Manhattan and Downtown Brooklyn, I would've preferred a geographically accurate map. I've had a guy walk up to me at Coney Island asking me which train goes to Bay Parkway. They all do except for the (Q), but you'd have to know the area pretty darn well already to name specific train. (He was looking for the Bay Parkway by West 5~7 Street, by the way, so I sent him to the (N).)

 

That's one problem I've noticed especially with tourists and NYers going to different neighborhoods: most people don't pick up on the fact that a square with the train number/letter indicates the terminal stop. That's why I was thinking the individual colored lines for every train would help ease some confusion. But that's just me

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I prefer the current style, although I believe they should put back the service guide on the maps.

 

Yeah that old school service guide was clutch and should be brought back with the individual line maps on the platform columns.

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I've never been a fan of the Vignelli map, in part because every line having its own color just got really confusing and hard to read. At the same time, I have issues with the current map. Kick Map all the way for me.

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I always liked the more geographic map, but I also like the individual line drawings. I wish they would just add that to the current map, perhaps making the lines thinner in the Manhattan CBD's, where the lines run together, and are cluttered.

This could also be used to show times of operation, buy shading, like they do on the Weekender map.

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The 1968 Map scheme was very colorful. I prefer the 1968 map even though it's not an option. The 2012 Map looks like every color is a service with multiple routings and terminals.

 

That's because they are. The current color-coding system emphasizes that each north-south line in Midtown/Lower Manhattan is a line with multiple branches and those branches are designated by a letter or number. As colorful as the 1968 map was, by assigning each lettered or numbered route its own random color, it made things confusing. Only eight colors were used and there was no rhyme or reason to how they were used. At least the 1979 map finally created some sort of logic to the color system.

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Tourists who came to visit NYC when (V)(W)(Mx) exist, they have old subway maps.

 

Sometimes even foreign guidebook doesn't updated subway map very soon.

 

Sometimes tourists wait for trains that does not operate on weekend.

 

It's especially pain when (E) train rerouted on (F) line on weekend G.O, and tourists who want to go to JFK via (E) over the (A) wait for it.

I always keep wondering if tourists missed their flight b/c (E) was not on regular route.

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