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Around the Horn

Three Brooklyn R Stations are First in Major Subway Station Modernization Project

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It's official:

-53 Street closes Monday

-Bay Ridge Avenue closes April 29

-Prospect Avenue closes June 5

 

To the press release:

Three century-old r.png line stations in Brooklyn will be the first to undergo an expansive subway station modernization project, with a new look and design that focuses on customer experience and modern amenities. 

The stations at 53 St, Bay Ridge Av and Prospect Av will get top-to-bottom renovations from the entrances to the turnstile areas to the mezzanines and platforms. The renovations for all three stations include infrastructure work such as concrete and steel repairs; new platform edges; waterproofing; upgraded electrical and communications systems; track wall and platform wall repairs; new granite flooring; new stair finishes; glass barriers in station mezzanines; new LED lighting; and improved station signage.

Customers will see refurbished entrances with new handrails, stair treads, wall tiles, totems and digital screens that provide real-time service information at the street level before they even enter the station. Canopies will be installed at select key entrances. Walls and ceilings will be repaired, and new granite flooring, informational dashboards and glass barriers will be installed. LED light fixtures for brighter, more secure areas will be installed, along with security cameras and Help Points. Digital screens for real-time arrival information, updated service information and advertising will be installed. Customer amenities include new station art; electronics charging stations built into station furnishings; new platform edges, and new benches and leaning bars.

These three stations on the r.png  line opened in 1915 as part of the Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Corporation. The extensive renovations will require major demolition before work can begin. Stations will be closed for construction for six months each, with the first one being 53 St, which closes for service in both directions on Monday, March 27. 

The Bay Ridge Av station is scheduled to close on April 29 for six months; and the Prospect Av station is scheduled to close on June 5 for six months. During the closures, customers are encouraged to use nearby subway stations, the B37 bus route or the B63 route, which run on Third and Fifth avenues run parallel to the r.png line in the area.

The cost of the three-station project will be $72 million, with the work performed by Citnalta-Forte Joint Venture. The firm will use a design-build method at these stations, which is the first time that MTA New York City Transit is using the method for delivering construction projects. Previously NYC Transit made station component repairs using a piecemeal method that allowed limited service at the affected stations but stretched the construction timeline, sometimes to years. 

"These first three stations to be renovated represent the start of a new age for our subway system. By using the design-build method, we are putting the onus on one contractor to get the work done seamlessly and on time,” said MTA Interim Executive Director Ronnie Hakim. “The emphasis is on giving them complete access to the stations and the ability to get in, get done and get out as quickly as possible. We specifically sought out companies that have worldwide experience with building infrastructure and transportation projects, and we expect them to put the best industry practices to use here." 

For the station modernization project, the MTA worked with consultants Grimshaw Architects to study and revise existing design guidelines for stations and facilities, with a focus on identifying ways to improve their appearance, usage, wayfinding and the flow of foot traffic. These revised guidelines will change the way that subway stations look and feel going forward and establish the new look of subway stations, influencing station design long after this major renovation project is complete. The entire modernization project is part of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo's package of enhancements and capital investments to improve the reliability, capacity and reputation of the subway system.

 

The next group of stations that will be renovated are the Broadway, 30 Av, 36 Av, and 39 Av stations on the Astoria-Ditmars Blvd line in Queens.  

 

  • Upvote 2

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Well thats gonna inconvenience some... I know for a fact that if you don't catch the B9 from Bay Ridge Ave that its a pretty long walk to 59th. I guess you could catch the B63 or B37 but tbh nobody likes waiting for the bus.

 

Interested to see how it turns out though. We need our subway to be in the 21st Century - not just the city.

Edited by DailyDose

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I wonder why stations like Chamber Street and Bowery on the (J), and 21st on the (G) aren't chosen for this huge refurbishing process.

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I wonder why stations like Chamber Street and Bowery on the (J), and 21st on the (G) aren't chosen for this huge refurbishing process.

Chambers St would be a far bigger undertaking than a station on 4th Av.

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I wonder why stations like Chamber Street and Bowery on the (J), and 21st on the (G) aren't chosen for this huge refurbishing process.

This is a test bed of the design-build process. And as previously stated, Chambers Street would be a monster. But if this is a successful way to timely reneovate stations, I could see Chambers Street being added to the next phase of stations after the original bunches.

 

Besides, I remember Chambers was supposed to be renovated as far back as 2012 if I'm not mistaken.

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 http://web.mta.info/nyct/service/planned_servChanges_NRtrains_mar2017.htm

Planned Service Changes arrow.jpgService Change arrow.jpgWhat's happening?
 
N_100px.pngR_100px.png
ALL TIMES

Beginning 5 AM, Mon Mar 27 
until Fall 2017

Trains skip 53 St in both directions

Use nearby N_26px.png R_26px.png stations via B37 and B63 local buses

Travel alternatives:

  • Use nearby 45 St or 59 St stations for n.png r.png service.
  • Take local bus routes for connections.
bus_icon_large.jpg Bus Route Bus Route B37
(days/evenings only) Toward 45 St r.png: on 3 Av at 53 St Toward 59 St n.png r.png: on 3 Av at 52 St or on 3 Av at 54 St B63 Toward 45 St r.png: on 5 Av at 52 St Toward 59 St n.png r.png: on 5 Av at 53 St

NR_map.jpg

 

Other changes to service may affect your trip. Please consult Service Change Directories or visit mta.info to use TripPlanner+.


  Back to top

Beginning Monday, March 27, the 53 St  N_26px.png R_26px.png station will close for major station improvements.

What's coming to 53 St:

1.jpg
  • Improved Station Entrance
  • New protective canopies
  • Customer information screens
  • Safety and security improvements
 
3.jpg
  • Mezzanine Level
  • Easier way-finding
  • Reconfigured turnstiles area
  • Clear sight lines and new signs
 
2.jpg
  • Platform Level
  • Customer information dashboards
  • Brighter energy efficient lighting
  • Wi-Fi and cellular connectivity
  Back to top Click here to plan your trip with Trip Planner+, or call 511 for automated travel information 24/7; agents are available from 6 AM to 10 PM daily. Hearing impaired customers: use your preferred relay service provider or the free 711 service relay to reach 511. If you cannot be connected for any reason, you can ask the representative to connect you to 511 via the following phone number: 877-690-5116.

 

Edited by Union Tpke

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Chambers St need tons of work.

Chamber St maybe they got a excuse, it's big but Bowery? That station shouldve got their station rehabilitated in 2004 when they closed half of it like Canal St. But both of them need to a least look good. They can start by getting the tiles fixed. Edited by Mtatransit

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They are moving ridiculous quickly on 53rd Street. They've taken advantage of the G/O on the southbound (R) to completely close off the Bay Ridge bound platform and in 36 hours, have already completely removed the current concrete, erected some portions of wooden barrier along the platform edge and installed the running board portion of the tactile edges...

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They are moving ridiculous quickly on 53rd Street. They've taken advantage of the G/O on the southbound (R) to completely close off the Bay Ridge bound platform and in 36 hours, have already completely removed the current concrete, erected some portions of wooden barrier along the platform edge and installed the running board portion of the tactile edges...

Holy s#!+

 

That was fast. 

 

If only the MTA could go that fast on, say SAS...

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Holy s#!+

 

That was fast. 

 

If only the MTA could go that fast on, say SAS...

I wouldn't be surprised if they get this done before the deadline. Plus, the SAS took more time considering they're building stations completely from scratch as well as digging through ground.

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Chamber St maybe they got a excuse, it's big but Bowery? That station shouldve got their station rehabilitated in 2004 when they closed half of it like Canal St. But both of them need to a least look good. They can start by getting the tiles fixed.

 

 

Yeah, Bowery fits the profile of the other stations getting these renovations - relatively low-use local stations without transfer points. It's bizarre - I doubt there's any reason they couldn't do that station.

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Yeah, Bowery fits the profile of the other stations getting these renovations - relatively low-use local stations without transfer points. It's bizarre - I doubt there's any reason they couldn't do that station.

My only thought could that they are saving Bowery and its ilk for Part 2 of the ESI (the next 30?)

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My only thought could that they are saving Bowery and its ilk for Part 2 of the ESI (the next 30?)

 

 

There's no reason that they would do 163rd-Amsterdam at a different time than Bowery - they're both local stations with fairly low ridership that look like crap.

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Im not surprised this is moving quickly. Europe does this right? Why the MTA waited this long to try this method of renovation is beyond me.

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It's the old "if it wasn't invented here, we can't use it" ideology. It's really annoying when you get right down to it.

  • Upvote 7

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It's the old "if it wasn't invented here, we can't use it" ideology. It's really annoying when you get right down to it.

 

It's also the insistence that everything here must run at 100% 24/7/365. 24/7 operation is an oddity outside of New York; if 24-hour operation exists in other cities, it's usually only Friday-Monday.

 

In other places, people grumble, but are generally willing to deal with it for months at a time if it means better stations, even if it's months-long disruption.

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