Jump to content
Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.
Sign in to follow this  
Quill Depot

What Company Makes Your Comuter and What do You Think About that Company

Recommended Posts

Sorry for being curious and the long title, But what company makes you computer. I would also like to know how you feel about that company.

 

Asus makes my laptop and I feel they do a great job at making it. I've had it for more than a year and there have been no problems At All.

Edited by jimmy7train
??????????????????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Desktop A: Dell Insipron 518, along some modifications to it

*Added a Buffalo PCI E USB 3.0 Card

*Added one stick of 2GB DDR2 memory from PNY

This one is aging a bit, and its served its purpose already. I'm looking into replacing it when I get the chance

 

Desktop B: Built myself using parts from:

*nVidia (EVGA) (Graphics)

*ASUS (Motherboard)

*CoolerMaster (Case, LED Fans)

*Corsair (Power Supply, RAM, H70 Liquid Cooler)

*Western Digital (Hard Drive)

*Intel (Processor)

*NZXT (Fan Control)

Gaming system

 

Laptop: HP Pavilion dv6 3055dx, Alienware M17X

Heat issues (both), slow hard drive (HP), but nothing so bad to the point where I have to ship it back

 

I've heard of some stories about people having issues with the same things I used, but either I'm really lucky or their reviews are bogus because I never had to return any parts that I buy

Edited by YankeesPwnMets

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Fujitsu laptop "Made in Japan". :cool: I think it's good in terms of the quality. Better than the Chinese crappola and I plan to buy two Fujitsu's down the road (one for home and one for the road). The thing this laptop is 3 years old, but it runs so well that I see no need to replace it yet, but eventually it will be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Laptop: Acer boot failure=FAIL RIP:(

Desktop E Machines p4 3.06GHZ 1 GB RAM 200 GB HDD 17" widescreen

$200 at Cash America to replace the above

I know this is a lower tier brand but it works for what i ask of it..web surfing loading MP3 players EBay work and such.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a HP Pavillion DV7 Beats Audio Notebook. It has 4GB of DDR3 RAM made by Samsaung. 500GB 7200RPM HDD. Blu-Ray DVD Disc/Burner with lightscribe. A Webcam and microphone. Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit. AMD Phenom II N640 Dual-core processor clocked at 2.9Ghz. A Radeon HD4250 card. A 17.3" Display. A fingerprint reader. Not bad for about 1100 Dollars

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My laptop:

 

DSCN0553.jpg

 

And a heavily modified Dell Dimension PC from 2006, which I use for my art-related work

 

DSCN00520001JPEG.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a HP Pavillion DV7 Beats Audio Notebook. It has 4GB of DDR3 RAM made by Samsaung. 500GB 7200RPM HDD. Blu-Ray DVD Disc/Burner with lightscribe. A Webcam and microphone. Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit. AMD Phenom II N640 Dual-core processor clocked at 2.9Ghz. A Radeon HD4250 card. A 17.3" Display. A fingerprint reader. Not bad for about 1100 Dollars

 

 

I got the nearly the same for $850

 

Phenom II X4 N930

HD4250

Webcam + Mic + Fingerprint reader

640 GB 7200RPM drive

Came with Windows 7 Home 64 bit

DVD only

 

IMH, Beats are the biggest ripoffs I've ever seen. I tried my friend's Beats and they were the worst, most overpriced POS I've ever seen.

 

Also, I bought a copy of Windows 7 Ultimate and Professional on Black Friday and I just wiped the entire drive and install Ultimate 64 instead. Whenever I get a new prebuilt computer I wipe the OS and install my own retail copy of Windows. I cant stand that the bloatware pieces of shit HP, Dell and a lot of the other companies preinstall that they think will be "useful" to you.

 

@SoSpectacular: I suggest you improve the cable management in that PC. Dell has the shittest cable management ever. Try to use some cable ties and tie the cables together so they aren't just a blob of wires on the top of your computer I had to wrestle around these snakes just to put in a stick of RAM. The floppy power cable I needed for my USB 3.0 card was too short but luckily the package had a SATA power to floppy power connector and that work. Your graphics card is in a awkward position as well... normally the fan is facing the bottom of the case yet with this board the graphics card fan is facing upwards

 

Another thing: What heatsink is that? It looks larger then a Noctua NH D14 :(

Edited by YankeesPwnMets

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My computers are built, assembled, and serviced by Trainmaster 5 enterprises of the USA. The parts are from AMD, Gigabyte, Western Digital, G-Skill, Nvidia, and Creative. I'm still looking for my laptop, which will probably be powered by an AMD (Llano) APU. The builder/assembler is great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

@SoSpectacular: I suggest you improve the cable management in that PC. Dell has the shittest cable management ever. Try to use some cable ties and tie the cables together so they aren't just a blob of wires on the top of your computer I had to wrestle around these snakes just to put in a stick of RAM. The floppy power cable I needed for my USB 3.0 card but luckily the package had a SATA power to floppy power connector and that work. Your graphics card is in a awkward position as well... normally the fan is facing the bottom of the case yet with this board the graphics card fan is facing upwards

 

Another thing: What heatsink is that? It looks larger then a Noctua NH D14 :(

 

Those cables all come from the power supply, I had to yank out the old 350 watt one and buy a 500 watt one to power the graphics unit I had also bought years ago, the cables were the surprise, as they were longer than I'd expected so I did my best to tuck them in places where they wouldn't interfere, that's the best I could do really.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got two laptops, a Dell Latitude D630 and Fujitsu LifeBook T2010. My usual desktop is an iMac (Core 2 Duo 2.66Ghz). On top of that, i've got a PC that I built myself as well as a PowerMac G4.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Those cables all come from the power supply, I had to yank out the old 350 watt one and buy a 500 watt one to power the graphics unit I had also bought years ago, the cables were the surprise, as they were longer than I'd expected so I did my best to tuck them in places where they wouldn't interfere, that's the best I could do really.

 

I was digging in my computer room for some Apple stuff and I found a Corsair CX 430 V2 in there, and this morning I tried to yank out the PSU and there were these wacky bulges in the case to hold the PSU there I guess, and I still haven't been able to wrestle it out of there. The motherboard is in the way and I don't feel like dismounting the entire mobo and then remounting everything... stupid Dell. :mad:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I'm not too fond of the way Dell builds their PCs... That's why I'm planning on building my own desktop next time

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 2007 MacBook and an IBM desktop from 2009. I recently got the MacBook that my cousin gave me (a little over a week ago), but I need to buy a new charger and battery for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a 2007 MacBook and an IBM desktop from 2009. I recently got the MacBook that my cousin gave me (a little over a week ago), but I need to buy a new charger and battery for it.

 

That shouldn't be too expensive. Maybe $150 - 200 tops.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first ever computer a a COMPAQ (before it was bought out by HP). It's been around since 2000, and it's still functional with all of its original hardware. My parents paid $2000 for it and it came with a 20GB HD, 64MiB SDRAM, a DVD-ROM drive, a CD burner, and a 667MHz Celeron CPU. There was no graphics or sound card.

 

The desktops I have now are all custom built. For around the same amount of money as my first computer I got a 64GB SSD, 3TB HD, 24GiB ECC DDR3 SDRAM, 2.53GHz Hexacore Xeon, and a low-power Radeon HD 6450.

 

Talk about the speed of technological advancement…

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My first ever computer a a COMPAQ (before it was bought out by HP). It's been around since 2000, and it's still functional with all of its original hardware. My parents paid $2000 for it and it came with a 20GB HD, 64MiB SDRAM, a DVD-ROM drive, a CD burner, and a 667MHz Celeron CPU. There was no graphics or sound card.

 

The desktops I have now are all custom built. For around the same amount of money as my first computer I got a 64GB SSD, 3TB HD, 24GiB ECC DDR3 SDRAM, 2.53GHz Hexacore Xeon, and a low-power Radeon HD 6450.

 

Talk about the speed of technological advancement…

Wow... Right now I have an HP Pavilion dv7-6815us laptop that I bought a couple of months ago for around $1100 including tax. That got me a 17" screen, an i7-2630QM 2GHz CPU, 6GB DDR3 RAM (expandable to 16GB), 750GB HDD, and a Radeon HD 6490 graphics card.

 

I'm saving up to build myself a high-power desktop rig to complement it at some point, but I want to wait for Intel's new Ivy Bridge CPUs before I start buying parts for it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow... Right now I have an HP Pavilion dv7-6815us laptop that I bought a couple of months ago for around $1100 including tax. That got me a 17" screen, an i7-2630QM 2GHz CPU, 6GB DDR3 RAM (expandable to 16GB), 750GB HDD, and a Radeon HD 6490 graphics card.

 

I'm saving up to build myself a high-power desktop rig to complement it at some point, but I want to wait for Intel's new Ivy Bridge CPUs before I start buying parts for it...

Keep an eye on AMD. I think they've got something brewing. I'm also investing heavily into eco-friendly desktops—currently Intel Atom-based, but they suck performance-wise so I'm hoping for an ARM-based or AMD APU-based replacement for the future. Those electricity bills add up if you don't pay attention to the kind of systems you run.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

lol intel

 

More like lack of intel if you buy a PC powered by it.

 

I have this low-end Dell laptop. Even with a dual-core processor (rated at 2.2 GHz and with 2.75 GB of usable RAM) I still manage to make the thing hang.

 

Maybe down the line I'll build my own PC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those Xeons are pretty damn good, the Mac Pros in our digital art lab over at QCC kick some serious ass.

 

Something that I've taken quite an interest to is the use of solid state drives, the performances those deliver are top-notch but pricey, ugh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lol intel

 

More like lack of intel if you buy a PC powered by it.

 

I have this low-end Dell laptop. Even with a dual-core processor (rated at 2.2 GHz and with 2.75 GB of usable RAM) I still manage to make the thing hang.

 

Maybe down the line I'll build my own PC.

 

Generally, Intel processors provide more performance over AMD.

 

And yes, AMD has Bulldozer processors up coming, but as of now, nothing from AMD beats the i5 Sandy Bridge and i7. AMD is generally more to the customers who want to get "best bang for the buck" while Intel is for people who want performance and don't care all that much about the cost

 

@joel Up front: 2.2 Ghz dual core isn't what I would call powerful... My assumption is that you use Pentium or Celeron and those two processor families are for your mom and dad who just go on the internet with their PC and nothing else....

 

You get what you paid for

...This is especially true with computers. Most people expect way too much from their cheapo machines... just take a look at GTAForums' PC Performance Tip section

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Those Xeons are pretty damn good, the Mac Pros in our digital art lab over at QCC kick some serious ass.

 

Something that I've taken quite an interest to is the use of solid state drives, the performances those deliver are top-notch but pricey, ugh

SSDs are especially good with live raw video recording as the write speed is going to be the bottleneck for storage intensive applications. I was recording a game at 1920×1200×30 (resolution and frames per second) which produced over a hundred megabytes every second—and that's with real-time lossless compression. Do that with a regular hard drive and it'll stop recording abruptly or drop frames because it couldn't write down all the data.

 

SSDs are pretty good with multitasking too, as it thrives with parallel workloads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SSDs are especially good with live raw video recording as the write speed is going to be the bottleneck for storage intensive applications. I was recording a game at 1920×1200×30 (resolution and frames per second) which produced over a hundred megabytes every second—and that's with real-time lossless compression. Do that with a regular hard drive and it'll stop recording abruptly or drop frames because it couldn't write down all the data.

 

SSDs are pretty good with multitasking too, as it thrives with parallel workloads.

 

No, that is the CPU and RAM that deals with multitasking. Generally, the higher your clock speeds and the more cores/threads you have, the better multitasking performance you would get.

 

Also, video compressing performance is based off of CPU and RAM. Take a look at FRAPS. A 10 minute video is around 3GB, but if you record in HD, you will get the video in HD no matter your hard drive's sequential read and write speeds. The video has to be shrunk, or compressed to a smaller file size, and the better your CPU, or in some cases, the GPU, the faster the video compressing. your SSD won't affect video encoding or compressing performance.

 

The only real thing SSDs affect is boot up and load time. SSDs are overpriced in many ways, as you would only get a few seconds of your time saved over a mechanical drive and there are no real benefits over it, other then the fact that they are a bit quieter and cooler. However, the average user wouldn't exactly care about any of that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.