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Train Operator Exam # 8098

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I'd like to loose 20 pounds by the medical. Prob sounds crazy, but this is a job i been looking forward to i n a long time!

I look forward to meetig you guys one day! @runningonrails, maybe we'll be in same class down the road!

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@Mike, definitely no weight or body mass limits. You do need to hoist yourself onto a train and walk on narrow paths. They'll do an EKG, check blood pressure, do vision and hearing tests.

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@tprashad, i am willing to work holidays next couple years just to get on lol. Anyone has an ideas if they will be running more classes after Oct 26th regulary?

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School car is good but very intense. Signals are no joke. Like working an extra half time job just to learn your signals. @Mike, you should be fine. There's a ladder rung ("safety step") to help you climb onto the train, but you'll need a fair amount of upper body strength as well, for pulling yourself up and carrying equipment.

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They drill allot of info into you and that's still just half there's more to read then they take you on that piece of equipment get you familiar with it to cuts n adds yard inspection n road movement good news to those still waiting there gonna be calling people in @ least till the end of the year so there's @ least 3 more classes to fill

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School car is a highly structured program of lectures, tests and practical learning at locations throughout the subway system, everywhere but Staten Island. It's a full-time job, 40 hours a week, plus substantial commuting time and a lot of studying at home. It lasts 6-9 months. You'll get a day-by-day schedule your first week. You'll need to pass multiple written exams and yard practicals (demonstrations of your practical knowledge gained on this job working on specific mechanical issues and handling the train). You actually spend only a small portion of your time at school car, which is a repurposed elementary school in south Brooklyn near Coney Island. That's the administrative center for NYCT training and where formal written tests are conducted. Most of your time will be on the road at various subway yards.

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Signals are the most important. Whether you're in A Div or B Div is where the amount of equipment you'll have to learn comes into play. Alot more lines and cars in B than in A. Also be prepared to travel all over the city for classes. You could be at one yard close to home, maybe do 2 days there. Sounds nice right? The 3rd day, you could be an hours ride away at another yard. Being in B Div, for 3 days straight, we were at Jamaica yard. Great for me. On the last 2 days, Concourse yard in the Bronx, and 207 yard in upper Manhattan. With all the books, equipment you have to carry, it's not fun. But if you want the job that badly, you take it & deal with it. Most important is to be safe and do what your instructors ask of you.

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Thats awsome news to hear that they have at least 3 more classes. Hoping i get in to one of them before the New Year!

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@Tprashad, yes, to some extent, it just depends on how good you are at parking in crowded parts of the boroughs. They do NOT provide any parking in any yard for trainees, so you're on your own finding a spot. Sometimes, some days you may need to pay. Others you might get a parking ticket or worst case get towed. Be careful if you're going to be finishing the day somewhere other than where you started. TA policy is you're not supposed to drive between duty locations ("on the clock") if your TA job isn't driving yourself or other people around. Also, you're OK if transit is delayed but you're still late without excuse if you get stuck in traffic or have parking problems.

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Taking the train is what I do. It can definitely take longer but it's simpler and cheaper. But if you enjoy driving to work it is an option. You may need to backtrack on your own time via public transit on the rare day you'll be ending a different place than you started.

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I'm going to add to this discussion about school car.

 

It is an intense program, that moves fast the first couple months. You have to be able to keep up. It will be a night and day experience for most. The first week during the orientation everyone who was called in is felling like they made it to the promise land, after orientation when you break off into classes that when it all begins, and everything moves at a fast pace, and the quizzes show up a couple weeks there after. You have to know and understand how to operate, prepare and troubleshoot trains, understand yards, locations, tracks, and of course signals. It's your responsibility to keep what ever they show you or teach you to memory. You will feel like your in a boot camp. You will be doing a lot of walking, while carrying a heavy bag (no backpacks) around the city. You will have good days and bad days... It's all part of the regimen. A lot of information is being thrown at you, in a short amount of time. Therefore the instructors have limited amount of time to teach you what you need to know to prepare for the tests you will be taking.

 

This job is not for everyone, and you have to secure it by passing all the different tests that will be thrown at you. One question wrong on the signal test and you are done, mess up on the practical once, twice and your done, score less than 80% on the mid-term test and your done... It's not hard, but it's also not that easy. Some people are slow learners, and some people learn fast. Some people have great mechanical skills, and other don't. Do the best you can. The hardest part is not knowing if you will make it through. If you can take a leave of absence from your current job, do it.

 

Enjoy the adventure once you get in, you will learn a lot about the city and the MTA. Its a good job with great opportunities. I took my practical last week and my mid-term test the other day. Which I passed. Next week will be my signal test, and I am hoping for the best, and plan to do my best. I have learned and seen a lot in the last seven weeks. My class has had real hands-on experiences that others won't see in their entire career here in transit. The horror stories you hear are real. "Welcome to transit!" 

 

Good luck to all.

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I'm going to add to this discussion about school car.

 

It is an intense program, that moves fast the first couple months. You have to be able to keep up. It will be a night and day experience for most. The first week during the orientation everyone who was called in is felling like they made it to the promise land, after orientation when you break off into classes that when it all begins, and everything moves at a fast pace, and the quizzes show up a couple weeks there after. You have to know and understand how to operate, prepare and troubleshoot trains, understand yards, locations, tracks, and of course signals. It's your responsibility to keep what ever they show you or teach you to memory. You will feel like your in a boot camp. You will be doing a lot of walking, while carrying a heavy bag (no backpacks) around the city. You will have good days and bad days... It's all part of the regimen. A lot of information is being thrown at you, in a short amount of time. Therefore the instructors have limited amount of time to teach you what you need to know to prepare for the tests you will be taking.

 

This job is not for everyone, and you have to secure it by passing all the different tests that will be thrown at you. One question wrong on the signal test and you are done, mess up on the practical once, twice and your done, score less than 80% on the mid-term test and your done... It's not hard, but it's also not that easy. Some people are slow learners, and some people learn fast. Some people have great mechanical skills, and other don't. Do the best you can. The hardest part is not knowing if you will make it through. If you can take a leave of absence from your current job, do it.

 

Enjoy the adventure once you get in, you will learn a lot about the city and the MTA. Its a good job with great opportunities. I took my practical last week and my mid-term test the other day. Which I passed. Next week will be my signal test, and I am hoping for the best, and plan to do my best. I have learned and seen a lot in the last seven weeks. My class has had real hands-on experiences that others won't see in their entire career here in transit. The horror stories you hear are real. "Welcome to transit!" 

 

Good luck to all.

I SECOND EVERYTHING !!!!! A lot of people have relatives that have been in Transit for YEARS and YEARS...New Transit is not like the old...We are drilled day in day out..If you mess up, FESS UP..Eyes and ears everywhere..Trains for the most part, can talk. They do not like people that 'LIE' down in the MTA..Your life there will be short lived. Study..Rest, and then when you feel like you have studied enough..Study more...GOOD LUCK ALL !! It is a new way of life..

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I feel as if taking train to school car or whatever yard you going to is best option. Gas/tolls traffic!

I was saying the same thing the first couple weeks. Until I realized there was parking at most yards, or street parking. Some yards in Brooklyn and Queens will take me about an hour and forty-five minutes to get to by train (one way), but if I drive it will take me twenty-five minutes, and thirty five minutes on the return trip. Some places here in Bronx if I drive will take me fifteen minutes literally, but a bus/train ride will be about an hour. It's the difference of leaving my house at 4:45 AM to make it to Queens by 6:30AM on the train, or leaving at 6AM and making it to the yard in Brooklyn Queens by 6:30 at the latest.... Remember that's one way. I always like to be at work a half hour early.

 

It's a risk because if you car breaks down, your on your own. You gotta have a backup plan. I'd probably pull over to the shoulder, secure it and hop in a cab. The chances of my car breaking down and catching a flat tire is slim, but you never know. Your time your choice. it''s a luxury.

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I know i can say that im ready to bust my a** for it. Nothing in life is a given! Work hard for what you want.

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Erik that's good to know man,because I was planning to drive mostly, but of course leave early to reach early

Today was a very long day due to medical but I was sworn in today to report on 10/26 ...I will post tomorrow of what's needed and what they look out for..I'm just too exhausted ..was there from 645 am to 330pm

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@Tprashad, congratulations! I know you've been waiting a long time.

 

Erik has a great take on things, BTW.

This is like boot camp.

You're offered a wonderful job but than you have to prove yourself over and over again if you're to keep the job. From speaking with mid level train operators (5-10 years experience) it seems to get much better, but you have to prove yourself and pay your dues the first few years.

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Thanks Matt appreciate it ..appreciate all your advice as well

 

I will give this 110% ,I guess I was just worried because I'm leaving a job I've been in for over 10 years where I have senority and set schedule of 8 to 4 pm with weekends off..takes me 10 minutes to reach there as well..big transition but time to move on and make twice as much

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As for medical, the vision was ridiculously hard but I walked with my glasses as back up..i passed without the glasses because the nurses do give you many chances to pass it..other then that my medical went quick and was done by 10:30 am ..i was there since 6:45am..now the waiting begins for the interview. .saw Mrs Valarie who was great by the way and she swore me in ..took me 2 hours to wait for an interview and another hour interviewed and go over your 21 page booklet..i left there around 3 pm ..so yes it's a all day session so walk with snacks and water for the urine test..do t forget your social security card,passport and license

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