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What letters can be used for future BMT/IND lines?


R160

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So now with the (T) coming in the next 30 or so years, what will the MTA use after that for BMT/IND service?

 

I'm guessing that they would want to use the (H) or (K) since it would have been several decades since those were in service. But other than that, there aren't many options. They cant use the (I), (O), (P), (U), or (Y).

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So now with the (T) coming in the next 30 or so years, what will the MTA use after that for BMT/IND service?

 

I'm guessing that they would want to use the (H) or (K) since it would have been several decades since those were in service. But other than that, there aren't many options. They cant use the (I), (O), (P), (U), or (Y).

Why can't they use the (O), (U), or (Y)? You also exclude other never-before-used letters like (X).

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They sound like words...

Oh, you, why.

So do these: (:) (bee), (C) (see), (J) (jay), (R) (our?), (T) (tee~t-shirt). I can understand (P) to some extent, but singling out (U), and (Y) seems arbitrary. In fact, even (P) should be used; it's childish to be so sensitive to possible misuses of letters.

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(R) is are. Besides the letter (H), (I), (K), (O), (P), (U), (V), (W), (X), and (Y) could be used. Even though some would sound like words they would have to be used if there are no other letters.

 

Let me complete it:

 

(A)-A

 

(G)-Gee

 

(I)-I

 

(K)-Ok text slang

 

(O)-Oh

 

(P)-Pee

 

(U)-You

 

(Y)-Why

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If they don't like it. Then bring back the double letters. They could use numbers too. There's no limit to numbers.

I'd like to see a 4 digit number go into a circle on a map.

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Wirelessly posted via (Mozilla/5.0 (Danger hiptop 4.7; U; rv:1.7.12) Gecko/20050920)

 

They skipped (I) for a reason and that's cuz itb looks too much like (1). They skipped (P) cuz of the obvious joke. They can use any letter they want

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But if there's no zero line, then why would (O) looking like (0) matter?

 

Also, S looks like 5 from far away but you'd be hard pressed to confuse the gray bullet with the green one.

 

I think the point here is that, when you have plenty of options, there's no reason to use these semi-awkward letters to name routes, but if we ever encounter a shortage, they'll probably be used.

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But if there's no zero line, then why would (O) looking like (0) matter?

 

Also, S looks like 5 from far away but you'd be hard pressed to confuse the gray bullet with the green one.

 

I think the point here is that, when you have plenty of options, there's no reason to use these semi-awkward letters to name routes, but if we ever encounter a shortage, they'll probably be used.

The (S) between Times Square and Grand Central is technically the 0 line just as the (S) in the Rockaways is really the (H). I don't know if the (S) between Franklin Avenue and Prospect Park has any internal designation. It's probably more confusing to have 3 lines using the same name.

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the diamonds are also underutilized only <6> and <7> remain

Let's face it: the more subtle distinctions you add to the name, the harder it is for tourists and other average people. People already have trouble figuring out the differences between the letters. Believe it or not, the train's letter could be right in front of them and they would still go to the train operator or the conductor to ask what train it was. Getting rid of double letters and diamond/circle distinctions would be much better for the slower populace who can't seem to catch up with rapid transit's simple nomenclature.

 

Is this the 6?

Is it express?

 

No sh**! What does the f**king sign say?

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The (S) between Times Square and Grand Central is technically the 0 line just as the (S) in the Rockaways is really the (H). I don't know if the (S) between Franklin Avenue and Prospect Park has any internal designation. It's probably more confusing to have 3 lines using the same name.

 

Right, why do they separate it internally when obviously people who don't work for the MTA need the most help? :confused:

 

IMO, we need a new route bullet system that has some connection with the physical location/destination of the route. If someone tells me to take the (7), that gives me no information in and of itself. I have to go look on a map to find out where the hell the (7) even is and where it goes. Now what if someone tells me to take the Flushing line? I have some idea of what I'm looking for without being tied to the subway map. The difficulty here would be coming up with a happy medium between (1)(2)(3) simplicity and "Pelham Bay Park via Lexington Ave" comprehensiveness.

 

IDK, just some thoughts, not like we're really going to be ditching the bullets anytime soon. :(

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