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Why is the designline order so slow?


Kingsbridge Bus

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Does anybody know why the designline order is so slow compared to the Ng's? When is the next bus coming in and what depots is it going to? the designlines have been at Amsterdam depot and it's confusing me.:confused:???!!!

 

Because its not the inital delivery, its still undergoing pilot testing. 1302 was at Amsterdam for Training but its now back at Manhattanville.

 

Order is going to be in Michael J Quill, Manhattanville & Grand Ave, as of the current plan.

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Because its not the inital delivery, its still undergoing pilot testing. 1302 was at Amsterdam for Training but its now back at Manhattanville.

 

Order is going to be in Michael J Quill, Manhattanville & Grand Ave, as of the current plan.

And to coincide with cait sith`s answer,Designlines facility is located in North Carolina and another in New Zeland.And if im correct,Designline builds conventional buses on imported chassis meaning that the company imports chassis frames from New Zeland to North Carolina USA.Of course delivering buses from down south takes time.

 

As far as the NG`s their final assembly is done right here in the state of New York,Oriskany to be exact and of course to give Orion Canadian workers jobs,They do the Chassis and bodywork in Mississauga Ontario Canada.So We have the benefit out of any transit system in the US to get buses delivered quicker due to our vicinity to Orion and we keep money in New York state under the "Buy America" act:tup:

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Regarding the DesignLines, there are supposed to be 5 more units for pilot testing; remember that these buses are the first of their kind in North America. DesignLine also needs to use the MTA as a proving ground for the buses in this hemisphere; the MTA is the launch customer for this model.

 

Also, these buses must be delivered by flatbed since they are not designed for long highway usage.

 

I am not sure yet if 1303 has been tested on the B24 yet. 1303 at Grand Avenue may be able to tell more about this model than 1302 and 1304; some of the streets on Grand Avenue routes are not that smooth, especially along the B13 and B60.

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Wouldn`t that take longer to get here?

 

If a locomotive from germany, or cars from japan can make the trip from their factories by sea in less than 2 weeks (3 for japan), i think a 800 mile trip would prolly take less than 3 days, oh and no "wide load" or special procedures, and they could carry more than one per carrier.

 

- A

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If a locomotive from germany, or cars from japan can make the trip from their factories by sea in less than 2 weeks (3 for japan), i think a 800 mile trip would prolly take less than 3 days, oh and no "wide load" or special procedures, and they could carry more than one per carrier.

 

- A

You have a point.Delivering on wide loaders increase the chances of a damaged bus more than a barge,but crap if the barge sinks you loose a great deal of buses and $$$$$. But still the Barge sounds like a better idea.:tup:
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If a locomotive from germany, or cars from japan can make the trip from their factories by sea in less than 2 weeks (3 for japan), i think a 800 mile trip would prolly take less than 3 days, oh and no "wide load" or special procedures, and they could carry more than one per carrier.

 

- A

 

Even on a flatbed, the trailer is probably still STAA.

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You have a point.Delivering on wide loaders increase the chances of a damaged bus more than a barge,but crap if the barge sinks you loose a great deal of buses and $$$$$. But still the Barge sounds like a better idea.:tup:

 

Pablo and i thought loading them onto an Antonov 225 8 at a time, fly into JFK would be a fun idea. :cool:

 

- A

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Actually, you have it reversed.

 

No Pablo has it right.

 

The DesignLine's are $560,000 per unit. The Orion 07.501 NG Hybrids are $540,000 per unit.

 

The cost savings using the DesignLine will negate the extra $20,000 spent because the DesignLine Hybrid uses FAR less Fossil fuel and FAR more fuel efficient than the Orion 7 Hybrid thus cutting our fuel cost and dependency down.

 

Come on Adam, get your facts before responding...

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Pablo and i thought loading them onto an Antonov 225 8 at a time, fly into JFK would be a fun idea. :cool:

 

- A

That`s a good Idea! We can have our new buses arrive in no more than 3 hours from their north carolina facility,but....To bad the(MTA) IS CRYING BROKE!! can`t really afford that:o

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Speaking of Designline, I saw bus 1302 with Amsterdam Depot stickers on it rolling up Madison yesterday. There were a few bus people on it, so I figured it was testing for the Amsterdam crew.

 

I saw it too. It made a stop at 57st & Madison Ave. Why would AMS have this bus:mad:

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  • 1 month later...
No Pablo has it right.

 

The DesignLine's are $560,000 per unit. The Orion 07.501 NG Hybrids are $540,000 per unit.

 

The cost savings using the DesignLine will negate the extra $20,000 spent because the DesignLine Hybrid uses FAR less Fossil fuel and FAR more fuel efficient than the Orion 7 Hybrid thus cutting our fuel cost and dependency down.

 

Come on Adam, get your facts before responding...

 

How many miles to the gallon the Orion 7s and Designliners get?

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