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Cortlandt Reopens


Amtrak7

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(R) Cortlandt St Station information

Beginning 5 PM Tuesday, Sep 6, 2011

 

The Brooklyn-bound platform reopens at Cortlandt St.

 

Cortlandt St is served by two subway lines at different times of the day. The (R) train at all times except late nights (approximately midnight to 6:30 AM.), and the (N) train during late nights.

 

One more item crossed off the list...

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One more item crossed off the list...

 

Good news to hear. With that said, i know i am going to be hammered for this controversial idea/comment little off topic lol.

 

With the Corlandt (R) station very soon going to be linked with a free transfer to the Fulton Transit Center, i always felt there is no need IMO to have '3' stations at Rector/Wall Street open overnights with the (R)(N)(4) and (1) lines. They are all just '3' blocks apart and i always felt overnights one of the stations in that area (i would pick Rector/Church St (N) station)should close.

 

If the Rector station was closed (it would also speed service)riders could either transfer to the (1)at Whitehall or soon at Corlandt/Fulton for the (4).

Or walk the 3 blocks to Rector. IMO Rector is a ghost town overnights and is less busy than say if the (MTA) reopen 24/7 service on the (J) line at Broad and Fulton Sts.

 

Just a thought.:eek:

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Guest lance25

First off, the Cortlandt St (N)/® station will be connected to the World Trade Ctr (E) station with an out-of-system connection to the Fulton St station proper.

 

Secondly, just because one line is very close to another line, it doesn't make either one any less useful or warrants a partial shutdown. With your logic, one could suggest the shutdown of the Broadway line south of 14 St-Union Sq as it's only a block or so away from the Lexington Avenue line. Then there's Sixth Avenue, which has both 7th and 8th Avenues nearby. Should we close one of those lines as well?

 

I'm not trying to bust your chops or anything. I'm just saying that even though some of the LoMan stations and lines are a bit close, they still do serve a purpose.

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First off, the Cortlandt St (N)/® station will be connected to the World Trade Ctr (E) station with an out-of-system connection to the Fulton St station proper.

 

Secondly, just because one line is very close to another line, it doesn't make either one any less useful or warrants a partial shutdown. With your logic, one could suggest the shutdown of the Broadway line south of 14 St-Union Sq as it's only a block or so away from the Lexington Avenue line. Then there's Sixth Avenue, which has both 7th and 8th Avenues nearby. Should we close one of those lines as well?

 

I'm not trying to bust your chops or anything. I'm just saying that even though some of the LoMan stations and lines are a bit close, they still do serve a purpose.

 

Lance you not busting my chops.:( As long as it does involve personal insults its all good:tup:. Plus this is related issue as for years the (MTA) has had thoughts of closing one of the Wall St/Rector stations on the current (N)/® & (4) and (1) lines overnights for years now.

 

Anyhow Lance it's apples and oranges. Those blocks in Midtown you talking about are long blocks. For example, walking from Union Sq to 14th/6th Ave (F)(L) station is almost about as much as at least 1/4 of a mile walk. While walking from Church/Trinity Place is like walking from 33-34th Street a couple of hundred feet.

 

Again i am addressing it since when i used to live in SW Brooklyn a decade ago and had to take the then (W) it would frusrtated me when the trains would stop at Midnight at Rector and the only people at the station would be the station agents.;)

 

Even last summer when spending the night at a friend house and riding the (N) overnight to Stillwell at 11pm on a Saturday Night, no one got off or boarded at Rector.

 

It's good Corlandt is re-open since it reconnects a 24/7 link between the Path and to the (R) and overnights the (N)as well. Corlandt is also only 2-3 blocks away from Rector. Plus the (1) and (4) are nearby as well.

 

What i am suggesting is that the (MTA) during *overnights only* close the Rector (N)(R) station. Riders in that area have the (1) and (4) stations as well for alternative.

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Good news to hear. With that said, i know i am going to be hammered for this controversial idea/comment little off topic lol.

 

With the Corlandt (R) station very soon going to be linked with a free transfer to the Fulton Transit Center, i always felt there is no need IMO to have '3' stations at Rector/Wall Street open overnights with the (R)(N)(4) and (1) lines. They are all just '3' blocks apart and i always felt overnights one of the stations in that area (i would pick Rector/Church St (N) station)should close.

 

If the Rector station was closed (it would also speed service)riders could either transfer to the (1)at Whitehall or soon at Corlandt/Fulton for the (4).

Or walk the 3 blocks to Rector. IMO Rector is a ghost town overnights and is less busy than say if the (MTA) reopen 24/7 service on the (J) line at Broad and Fulton Sts.

 

Just a thought.:eek:

 

I actually agree and the main reason is because the (R) train makes enough stops as it is.

 

just keep Rector open, another stop on the (R) isnt gunna kill ya :(

 

Actually, I would shut down Rector so that the station could be completely gutted and redone. That station is an absolute dump and I always hated having to wait for the train there.

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I actually agree and the main reason is because the (R) train makes enough stops as it is.

 

 

 

Actually, I would shut down Rector so that the station could completely gutted and redone. That station is an absolute dump and I always hated having to wait for the train there.

 

It amazing and a surpise that the Rector (R) and (N) station has not been rebulit. It's not as bad as say the Concourse (D) or the (G) stations but i do agree it's a 'dump' and needs work asap.

 

The Rector (R) station is among the lowest used stations in Manhattan if i remember right as well. It's only 'busy' weekdays when Wall Street and other nearby businesses are open. Again i only suggested it close overnights when the station is a ghost town.

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It amazing and a surpise that the Rector (R) and (N) station has not been rebulit. It's not as bad as say the Concourse (D) or the (G) stations but i do agree it's a 'dump' and needs work asap.

 

The Rector (R) station is among the lowest used stations in Manhattan if i remember right as well. It's only 'busy' weekdays when Wall Street and other nearby businesses are open. Again i only suggested it close overnights when the station is a ghost town.

 

Not just that but it's in the heart of the financial district. All of the other stations around there have been redone or are being redone and in fact Cortlandt St got its second facelift, even though this one is due to 9/11 but still. It's rather embarassing if you ask me. If they're using federal funds to redo some of the stations down there, I don't see how Rector St hasn't been considered for a re-do. It's also too dark down there so it needs more lighting.

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I actually agree and the main reason is because the (R) train makes enough stops as it is.

 

The time saving would be minimal, though I wonder how bad the passenger drop will be once the Cortlandt Street Station is up.

 

Thank you God. The system is finally recovering from 9/11.

 

Blah, call me when the (1) station at the World Trade Center is open (btw, does anyone know when will it open?)

 

Not just that but it's in the heart of the financial district. All of the other stations around there have been redone or are being redone and in fact Cortlandt St got its second facelift, even though this one is due to 9/11 but still. It's rather embarassing if you ask me. If they're using federal funds to redo some of the stations down there, I don't see how Rector St hasn't been considered for a re-do. It's also too dark down there so it needs more lighting.

 

The station is probably the second worst looking station in the Lower Manhattan area, and I'm actually surprised it didn't get a rehab since 2001. Maybe they were waiting for Cortlandt street to fully reopen before doing something.

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The time saving would be minimal, though I wonder how bad the passenger drop will be once the Cortlandt Street Station is up.

 

Oh believe me, I know. I've used the (R) when it was bypassing Cortlandt St and it goes so slow that bypassing the stop didn't make much of a difference. I think my point was that the (R) train has too many stops to begin with. Perhaps if they get some new trains on that line it could be sped up, but I think the cars that they use just makes the trip seem even slower.

 

 

The station is probably the second worst looking station in the Lower Manhattan area, and I'm actually surprised it didn't get a rehab since 2001. Maybe they were waiting for Cortlandt street to fully reopen before doing something.

 

Yeah, I mean I would certainly prefer going over to Cortlandt if I needed the (R) rather than using Rector. :eek:

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i

 

 

Blah, call me when the (1) station at the World Trade Center is open (btw, does anyone know when will it open?)

 

 

 

The station is probably the second worst looking station in the Lower Manhattan area, and I'm actually surprised it didn't get a rehab since 2001. Maybe they were waiting for Cortlandt street to fully reopen before doing something.

 

They said it would be opened the Morning of Sept 11,2011 but the Stupid port authority kept it closed.

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I passed by the station yesterday, they cleaned it up nicely. Didn't look like that two weeks ago.

 

Also, they recently put up small temp walls towards the front of the northbound platform for what I believe would be the Fulton Street connection.

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They should have waited for 9/11/11. What's another 6 days when it's already been closed for almost 10 years?

I guess they wanted to open it as early as possible so that when the 10th anniversary rolls around, people know that it's definitely open instead of having to guess if it'll be open or not.

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whats wrong with how Rector St looks? Its in the same style that matches the 4th Avenue local stations. Plus its got the signs with 'Standard Medium' font, which is a plus.

 

lol... What isn't wrong with how Rector St looks and those 4th Avenue stations to boot!?!? :eek:

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Here's the problem:

 

The midnight or weekend N or R train is the alternative when the #4 train does not run to Brooklyn, due to a G.O. The #4 train is the midnight or weekend alternative to the N or R train when due to a G.O. and those trains are re-routed over the Manhattan Bridge going to/from Brooklyn.

 

When one starts to close stations during the midnight hours, there comes about several hardships for the riders. In the 1970's during the city's fiscal crisis - the idea of closing down several parts of the subways - midnight hours - was actually debated. The consensus then was that it was often more trouble than it was worth. Who really wants to play the game "Guess which station is open?" Which then points to the question of just who uses the subways midnight - depending on who asks the question - the answers will change. One short answer is powerless people - that's who.

 

When the #1 train (right after 9/11) was closed to South Ferry and re-routed to Brooklyn for about a 1 year (or more) getting to/from the Ferry Terminal from the westside and Greenwich Village was not an easy affair. Do not talk about the bus substitution - with ferries running once an hour - midnight hours - that bus was a sure fire way to miss the boat - been there done that.

 

Transit fan folks always say that "this station is close to that station" but they rarely actually WALK the distances on a day to day basis, deal with the hassle of missing trains (and ferries) as one has to bumble around getting from one station to the other. On the west side the 18th Street-7th Avenue station used to close midnight hours - to spare the costs of subway booth workers - the area residents hated it - now the station is open those times. Does it have something to do with Chelsea being a fashionable neighborhood? Filled with powerful people? You tell me.

 

Another example - the building of the Fulton Street Complex has often meant that the transfer between the #4 and #5 trains, and the A and C trains (G.O.'s, reroutes, etc) is disrupted. That is the only transfer station between those two lines, and traveling out of one's way to/from West 4th Street is not a simply pleasure. Saying to the riders "well it's just a couple of blocks to WTC" just does not hack it - no matter how close it looks on a map. The signage at Fulton Street is simply not helpful.

 

For example, when the MTA closed the 145th Street and 148th Street-Lenox Terminal stations with subsitituted bus service the residents of Harlem simply did not like it, they never liked it. Was it mere coincidence that with the promotion of the state's first black governor, who is from Harlem, the #3 was made a full-time route midnight hours to Times Square after several decades of it shutting down midnight hours? Or being a mere shuttle route - with an interesting track pattern?

 

To sum up - this is not a good idea. It may seem simple - but the costs and hardships are there. Making transit more difficult for the riders to use has never been a good idea.

Mike

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