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6 Lexington Ave

Infrastructure improvements to prevent flooding

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With hurricanes reaching New York more often than in the past, do you think there should be some sort of infrastructure improvements to prevent the subway from flooding, or, at least flooding as badly? I remember watching a documentary that was about how climate change has made hurricanes sustain their strength as they move north, therefore creating more of a threat to NYC and its neighbouring cities. A sign of this climate change is the rising water level that continuously threatens the subway.

In my opinion, the (MTA) should begin conducting studies on how to make the system less flood prone, be it with the design of subway entrances and ventilation shafts, or with the renovation of yards which are flood prone. I'm aware that these actions require quite a bit of time and money, but I believe they will pay off in the long term (if the (MTA) decides to think this way). What is your opinion?

P.S. I think that in an event such as the current one (Sandy) these measures will help in returning the system back to normal at a quicker pace.

Edited by 6 Lexington Ave

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I agree, it maybe more expensive but in the long run it will pay for itself. we need to protect the subway system from stuff like this in future.

 

 

I would propose a metal or concrete big Tunnel Doors Under the river tunnels or tunnels that are prone to floods, they can be closed by a switch,they can also but metal doors on the ventilators above ground that are prone to floods.make the trains yards concrete Elevated that are prone to flooding

Edited by MTARegional Bus
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I think an important factor in this is the city's willingness to perhaps consider constructing new levees in strategically located areas where water levels are prone to rise and surge into the streets in itself let alone the subway tunnels. That would definitely put a dead stop to much of this severe flooding in the future. Something in my opinion the State of New York seriously needs to consider. Taking a hint from Hurricane Sandy and Katrina for that matter.

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I think an important factor in this is the city's willingness to perhaps consider constructing new levees in strategically located areas where water levels are prone to rise and surge into the streets in itself let alone the subway tunnels. That would definitely put a dead stop to much of this severe flooding in the future. Something in my opinion the State of New York seriously needs to consider. Taking a hint from Hurricane Sandy and Katrina for that matter.

 

NYC does not need a katrina like hurricane.

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NYC does not need a katrina like hurricane.

 

 

We don't need a Hurricane NIMBY putting all current city proposals possibly being considered at this time under water either. ;)

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NYC does not need a katrina like hurricane.

 

 

If hurricanes can make a turn like sandy did so can a Cat 3 or 4 hurricane, so I think its necessary to but at levees or a

Hurricane barrier just like they have in Providence Rhode island which I heard did pretty well throw out the storm surge from sandy, am surprised we don't have one on the lower bay, :( but that maybe about to change soon hopefully.

 

I think the Hurricane barrier will be cost effected then the door tunnels for the subways that I mentioned.

Edited by MTARegional Bus

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easy solution, transition from subways to EL's. No more flooding issues go back to the old days when the Elevated's Ran the world.

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easy solution, transition from subways to EL's. No more flooding issues go back to the old days when the Elevated's Ran the world.

 

 

News Flash. The Rockaways and South Brooklyn lines *cough cough* (B)(D)(F)(N)(Q) are surronded by water. They all also elvated.

While no expert on this topic els can also be flooded. Period

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easy solution, transition from subways to EL's. No more flooding issues go back to the old days when the Elevated's Ran the world.

 

That is a perfect example of a solution that avoids the problem of flooding without actually solving the source of the problem.

Edited by Gong Gahou
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easy solution, transition from subways to EL's. No more flooding issues go back to the old days when the Elevated's Ran the world.

 

But you'd create a whole bunch of other problems (e.g. noise, structural maintenance, other bad weather such as snow).

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News Flash. The Rockaways and South Brooklyn lines *cough cough* (B)(D)(F)(N)(Q) are surronded by water. They all also elvated.

While no expert on this topic els can also be flooded. Period

 

 

No really, most of the lines are railroad ground routes.

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No really, most of the lines are railroad ground routes.

 

Exactly. Imagine what a monster of a storm would have to hit us in order for lines running 20-30 feet above ground to get flooded.

Edited by R10 1989

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The Rockaway Branch is also destroyed. The (MTA) was not prepared enough.

 

 

Surface level stations like Broad Channel, or elevated ones like Beach 67th?

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The Rockaway Branch is damaged, not destroyed. Severity of words counts.

 

 

It's a hyperbole. Stations like Broad Channel

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It's a hyperbole. Stations like Broad Channel

 

 

A pretty strong one at that... :lol:

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Exactly. Imagine what a monster of a storm would have to hit us in order for lines running 20-30 feet above ground to get flooded.

 

 

The water level at the Sheepshead bay station topped the top of the turnstiles in the lobby furthest from the water. Another 10-15 feet and it would have been on the tracks. a Category 2 or 3 would have brought those 10 to 15 feet extra.

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What about installing sewers at the entrances that have the capacity to "grab" the water before it goes down?

 

 

Not only do they cost money, but imagine if something were to go wrong with them during service? I mean, all there would be is a massive hole before entering Gravesend NB, but I do like the idea of adding some type of drainage system.

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Forgot what i was watching.... but they've been proposing building levee-like systems around the NY metro area since after Katrina

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The water level at the Sheepshead bay station topped the top of the turnstiles in the lobby furthest from the water. Another 10-15 feet and it would have been on the tracks. a Category 2 or 3 would have brought those 10 to 15 feet extra.

 

 

Well then, good thing that Sandy was a post-tropical cyclone as opposed to a Category 2 hurricane.

Edited by R10 1989

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