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Weird city buses


Dan05979

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I was looking for a picture of the Hino demonstrator to post, but what I did find, was this list of allt he demonstrator models; some of which I did not even know about:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retired_demonstration_Metropolitian_Transportation_Authority_(New_York)_bus_fleet

 

I always wondered what the powertrain of the Transbus was.

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This is what the RTS was supposed to look like: (found these online)

Renault MTA city bus.....

renaultbus.jpg

Ah, this here is the good old Renault PR100. Now this is a bus with an interesting history. The original PR100s were built by the equally-French Berliet company. The Berliet PR100's progress and development eventually forked and went in two radically different directions. On one end of the spectrum, the PR100 model became a product of Renault as the Berliet company died a slow death in the 1970s. This bus saw production until perhaps the late 1980s, and was popular in its own home country of France. On the other end of the spectrum, Berliet entered a joint license agreement with the Polish truck-and-bus company known as Jelcz. The resulting Jelcz-Berliet PR100 was the basis of an ultra-modern bus known as the Jelcz PR110, alengthened and improved version of the PR100. Many bus models have stemmed from this model. The PR100/PR110 had a very profound effect on the motor-vehicle industry of Poland in the 1970s/1980s. A very influential bus indeed.

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The RTS is the descendant of GMC's entry for the Transbus project which in turn was the descendant of the RTX, an experimental model for which a prototype produced in 1968 with notes of its production dating to early as 1964. Both the RTX and the Transbus were similar in terms of design to the RTS though had major differences in having a less-rounded body design, a one-step entryway, and (in the case of the Transbus) a 45-foot (14 m) length.

 

Wanting a backup plan in the case that the Transbus project was abandoned, GMC decided to modify the RTX/Transbus design and in 1970 began the project that became the earliest RTS with the first prototype being assembled in 1973 at which point the project went onto hiatus[1]. Though closer to its predecessors than the production models, the RTS name debuted with this prototype. After the project was revived in 1974, GMC would later withdraw from the Transbus project and focus their energies on the RTS.

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That's what I was thinking, looks like GM was experimenting with low-floors back in the day?

I recently read somewhere (possibly Wikipedia) that it was in fact low floor.

 

Also, I remember the Renault demonstator, parked right where it is in the picture. Looks just like a new model that would be built today. However, this is just the ubiquitous plain Euro bus look that you see everywhere else, as opposed to the unique US designs over the decades.

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