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If you see something (why bother) saying something


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This has been bothering me... the other day I was coming home on the train. The doors open and there's a guy lying face down on the platform. He's not moving. I get to the next station and I tell the token booth clerk there's a guy on the platform at the previous station passed out. Her reaction: "What do you want me to do about it?"

I was expecting her to abandon her post, run (not even take the train) to the station and give this dude CPR. (sorry there's no rolling eyes smiley I would have added it here). I was under the impression if something is wrong a token booth clerk would be able to reach out to someone to alert them. A supervisor, a cop, ANYONE. I find it hard to imagine in 2010 token booth clerks have zero access to the outside world.

 

I hear annoucements made all the time "Tell the police or an MTA employee". Why should anyone bother if no one is going to do anything about it?

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it doesnt work that way...........there is protocol to be followed, and one of them is "DO NOT LEAVE THE BOOTH UNLESS AUTHORIZED TO DO SO"...........the only thing the clerk could do is call for police to that station or whatever...........besides, that clerk doesnt know if you are saying that(as if to set him up for a robbery, etc).......

also, think about it: does it make sense for a clerk to go back to another station to perform that action?

so dont jump on the clerk for not leaving his/her post...........remember ta only cares about money, not anything or anyone else................t

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it doesnt work that way...........there is protocol to be followed, and one of them is "DO NOT LEAVE THE BOOTH UNLESS AUTHORIZED TO DO SO"...........the only thing the clerk could do is call for police to that station or whatever...........besides, that clerk doesnt know if you are saying that(as if to set him up for a robbery, etc).......

also, think about it: does it make sense for a clerk to go back to another station to perform that action?

so dont jump on the clerk for not leaving his/her post...........remember ta only cares about money, not anything or anyone else................t

 

He's asking why the clerk didn't call 911 or something like that.

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A lot of times station agents give that reaction because that is the reaction we get when we call it in. And also they have become so jaded from dealing with the vagrants every day. Command will act as if you are bothering them. The station agent should have called it in though. Just to put the ball in someone else's hand and your clear of all trouble. Or at least called the Agent at that station and give them a heads up.

 

BTW if you were so concerned why didn't you get off the train and get him help there.

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I was expecting her to abandon her post, run (not even take the train) to the station and give this dude CPR. (sorry there's no rolling eyes smiley I would have added it here). I was under the impression if something is wrong a token booth clerk would be able to reach out to someone to alert them. A supervisor, a cop, ANYONE. I find it hard to imagine in 2010 token booth clerks have zero access to the outside world.

 

from reading this line, it doesnt say whether or not the clerk called r.c.c......

in fact how do we know if he/she called? by the reaction given?

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I always find it intresting everyone cares so much about the person who is sick or not feeling well that they don't tell a TA employee until they get off at thier stop. If you really care you report something like that immediately rather it's getting off the train to tell the station agent or alert the Conductor.

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I always find it intresting everyone cares so much about the person who is sick or not feeling well that they don't tell a TA employee until they get off at thier stop. If you really care you report something like that immediately rather it's getting off the train to tell the station agent or alert the Conductor.

 

Karma will come back and do the same to them.

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I always find it intresting everyone cares so much about the person who is sick or not feeling well that they don't tell a TA employee until they get off at thier stop. If you really care you report something like that immediately rather it's getting off the train to tell the station agent or alert the Conductor.

 

Oh c'mon Dave, he alerted the S/A at the next station. Most New Yorkers wouldn't even do that much.

 

Bottom line is that the S/A should have called Control and let them handle it.

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This has been bothering me... the other day I was coming home on the train. The doors open and there's a guy lying face down on the platform. He's not moving. I get to the next station and I tell the token booth clerk there's a guy on the platform at the previous station passed out. Her reaction: "What do you want me to do about it?"

I was expecting her to abandon her post, run (not even take the train) to the station and give this dude CPR. (sorry there's no rolling eyes smiley I would have added it here). I was under the impression if something is wrong a token booth clerk would be able to reach out to someone to alert them. A supervisor, a cop, ANYONE. I find it hard to imagine in 2010 token booth clerks have zero access to the outside world.

 

I hear annoucements made all the time "Tell the police or an MTA employee". Why should anyone bother if no one is going to do anything about it?

 

95% of Station agents are nasty miserable people. Who in their right mind would want to do that job until retirement? Anyone with half a brain would go for a higher position or get a better job. They love taking their problems out on the public so I dont see why this is a surprise. My wifes metrocard wasnt working and the staion agent was cursing and yelling. Typical behavor of a rat in a box.

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I won't generalize, but I did face a clerk that gave me this 'I can't be bothered' look when I needed him to refill a metrocard [since at that time I wasn't too sure about using the machine]. Needless to say after that I learned quickly to use the machines only from then on.

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Oh c'mon Dave, he alerted the S/A at the next station. Most New Yorkers wouldn't even do that much.

 

Bottom line is that the S/A should have called Control and let them handle it.

 

I was wondering why didn't he get off at the station this guy was lying face down in. Why go to the next station, instead of getting off in the one he was in, where the guy was at?????????

 

95% of Station agents are nasty miserable people. Who in their right mind would want to do that job until retirement? Anyone with half a brain would go for a higher position or get a better job. They love taking their problems out on the public so I dont see why this is a surprise. My wifes metrocard wasnt working and the staion agent was cursing and yelling. Typical behavor of a rat in a box.

 

That's because the public love taking out their frustrations on easy to pick on MTA workers. They can't it out on those who they need to take it out on, but figure since we can't do anything about it, they can take it out on us. We are all human, and over time, you just get enough of it, that you can care less who is knocked out, or dead on a platform........

 

A lot of times station agents give that reaction because that is the reaction we get when we call it in. And also they have become so jaded from dealing with the vagrants every day. Command will act as if you are bothering them. The station agent should have called it in though. Just to put the ball in someone else's hand and your clear of all trouble. Or at least called the Agent at that station and give them a heads up.

 

BTW if you were so concerned why didn't you get off the train and get him help there.

 

Just like us calling in anything. Sick customer, "can they get off the train and on the platform?", is what RCC asks. If we see on "out-stretched", on the platform, for our sake, we better call it in, after we are pulling out of the station. We will regret getting off the train, to check if the person is alive. RCC and our hire-ups will make sure of that..........

 

Long as you ain't got hurt or died by MTA's or their employees doing, they can care less. No lawsuit for them to worry about........

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the clerk should have reported it to control. that is her job. she was wrong. case closed.

 

 

 

If the guy was in the station where the S/A is,then the clerk would call it in.other then that,nothing much the clerk could do.

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This has been bothering me... the other day I was coming home on the train. The doors open and there's a guy lying face down on the platform. He's not moving. I get to the next station and I tell the token booth clerk there's a guy on the platform at the previous station passed out. Her reaction: "What do you want me to do about it?"

I was expecting her to abandon her post, run (not even take the train) to the station and give this dude CPR. (sorry there's no rolling eyes smiley I would have added it here). I was under the impression if something is wrong a token booth clerk would be able to reach out to someone to alert them. A supervisor, a cop, ANYONE. I find it hard to imagine in 2010 token booth clerks have zero access to the outside world.

 

I hear annoucements made all the time "Tell the police or an MTA employee". Why should anyone bother if no one is going to do anything about it?

 

 

 

Why didn't YOU get off at the station where you saw this man on the floor and tell a S/A that someone needs help?

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This has been bothering me... the other day I was coming home on the train. The doors open and there's a guy lying face down on the platform. He's not moving. I get to the next station and I tell the token booth clerk there's a guy on the platform at the previous station passed out. Her reaction: "What do you want me to do about it?"

I was expecting her to abandon her post, run (not even take the train) to the station and give this dude CPR. (sorry there's no rolling eyes smiley I would have added it here). I was under the impression if something is wrong a token booth clerk would be able to reach out to someone to alert them. A supervisor, a cop, ANYONE. I find it hard to imagine in 2010 token booth clerks have zero access to the outside world.

 

I hear annoucements made all the time "Tell the police or an MTA employee". Why should anyone bother if no one is going to do anything about it?

 

I dont get it. if you were at the same station with the man on the platform, even tho u were on the train, why didnt u get off at the station the man was and get to the Station Agent at the same station instead of going to the next station..?

 

As for that S/A in the other station,

 

"What do you want me to do about it?"

 

That is such a low life. She could of called it in. If the scene was at the station you were speaking to this S/A he or she cant just stay quiet and mind ther business, they must call it in. Unless the S/a doesn't want to be endangered, but the s/a wouldn't since he/she is in the booth..

 

Of course, it could be that the s/a said that is becuz it wasn't an issue at his/her station..

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This has been bothering me... the other day I was coming home on the train. The doors open and there's a guy lying face down on the platform. He's not moving. I get to the next station and I tell the token booth clerk there's a guy on the platform at the previous station passed out. Her reaction: "What do you want me to do about it?"

I was expecting her to abandon her post, run (not even take the train) to the station and give this dude CPR. (sorry there's no rolling eyes smiley I would have added it here). I was under the impression if something is wrong a token booth clerk would be able to reach out to someone to alert them. A supervisor, a cop, ANYONE. I find it hard to imagine in 2010 token booth clerks have zero access to the outside world.

 

I hear annoucements made all the time "Tell the police or an MTA employee". Why should anyone bother if no one is going to do anything about it?

 

man just mind your own business and keep it moving. when people tell me stuff i say look i'll call it in but most likely this train will go out of service till the problem is solved. most times they will say forget it, its not that important. the public treats (MTA) workers like sh!t and expects us to treat them like gold. then they wonder why we can be nasty. you did it to us.

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I didn't think this topic would get that many responses.

 

For the people asking why I didn't get off the train and check - the doors opened, I saw the guy lying there, the doors closed. This was at Shea Stadium, it's not like there's a lot of dwell time. I was kind of startled by seeing someone on the platform. If I had more time to process it... who am I kidding, I still wouldn't have gotten off the train. I'm not a hero. Besides what if he was an undead zombie playing possum? Then what would I do??

 

Someone had mentioned a few posts back token booth agents (I guess all MTA employees) have to deal with crazy customers all the time so they might have thought I was another random loony which I hadn't thought about. I can't imagine the whackjobs you get coming up to the booths.

 

I did what I thought was right and that was alerting an employee. I didn't think she would react the way she did. My point was it's discouraging as a rider to have that kind of interaction when you're just trying to do the proper thing.

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Remember 90% of the MTA does not believe in If you see something say something. They believe in If you see something say nothing. Now if you were taking photos about 100% If you see something say something something will be done.

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I won't generalize, but I did face a clerk that gave me this 'I can't be bothered' look when I needed him to refill a metrocard [since at that time I wasn't too sure about using the machine]. Needless to say after that I learned quickly to use the machines only from then on.

 

And they wonder why their positions are being cut to save money.

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